From Knights to Dreamers

THE JOURNEY OF OUR UTAH DALTON FAMILY

FROM EARLY 1100 AD to 2007 AD and BEYOND


Author and Compiler

RODNEY GARTH DALTON


With the help of

ARTHUR REXFORD WHITTAKER


Researched by the Dalton Family Research Group of Utah

 

VOLUME III

TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR ALL 5 VOLUMES

Chapter 9 - The Dalton family settles in Circleville Utah

Chapter 9  Chapter 10  Back to The Dalton Chronicles

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

VOLUME I

CHAPTER ONE – Our Dalton family in Lancashire England

CHAPTER TWO – Our Dalton family in Ireland

CHAPTER THREE – Our Dalton Family in Oxfordshire England

CHAPTER FOUR – Our Dalton Family in South Wales

CHAPTER FIVE – Thomas Dalton Comes To America From Wales

VOLUME II

CHAPTER SIX - John Dalton Sr. born in America

CHAPTER SEVEN - The History of John Dalton’s Sons

CHAPTER EIGHT - The History of the Dalton Family in Utah

VOLUME III

CHAPTER NINE - The Dalton family settles in Circleville Utah.

CHAPTER TEN - Garth C. Dalton moves to Ogden Utah

VOLUME IV

CHAPTER ELEVEN - Some of our Dalton Wives

CHAPTER TWELVE - Dalton In-laws & Related Families

CHAPTER THIRTEEN - Our Dalton Family in Nauvoo

CHAPTER FOURTEEN - Early Ancestors of Some of Our Dalton Wives

CHAPTER FIFTEEN - How Our Dalton Family Connects to the Royal Houses

VOLUME V

CHAPER SIXTEEN - Vikings and Dalton Connection

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN - The History of John Doyle Lee

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN - Anne Radcliff's Ancestors

CHAPTER NINETEEN - Roger Dalton's Connections to King Henry II

CHAPTER TWENTY - History of the Medieval Wives' Families

 

 

- Chapter 9 –

 

The Dalton Family Settles in Circleville Utah

Martin Carrell Dalton and his wife Charlotte Whittaker Dalton

This chapter starts with the story of Martin C. Dalton Sr. and his descendent's. I have also added the story of Circleville’s famous outlaw, Butch Cassidy. Why? Because Butch Cassidy and his family were fiends with our Dalton family of Circleville.

24- Martin Carrell Dalton Sr., 1867 – 1936:

The fifth son of Charles Wakeman Dalton and Elizabeth Ann Heskett Allred.

Martin Carrell Dalton Sr. was born on Feb. 17, 1867 in Beaver City, Beaver Co., Utah. He Married Charlotte Ellen "Nellie" Whittaker on January 29, 1889 in Circleville, Piute Co., Utah. They had 8 children, all born in Circleville.

1-Martin Carrel Dalton Jr., born May 1, 1889.

2-Mary Irene Dalton, born Dec. 4, 1889.

3-James Christopher Dalton, born Nov. 11, 1896.

4-Nellie Vera Dalton, born Nov. 6, 1897.

5-Taylor Whittaker Dalton, born April 8, 1900.

6-Francis Joshua Dalton, born Feb. 5, 1902.

7-Lawrence Whittaker Dalton, born Nov. 7, 1905.

8- Vernon Allred Dalton, Oct. 12, 1909.

We know that Martin grew up in Beaver, Utah in his early years and moved to Circleville, Piute Co. Utah when he was 6 or 7 years old. He would marry his only wife, Charlotte and spend the remaining years of his life working hard to support his family of 8 children. He was a very prominent man in Circleville society.

Circleville was settled in March of 1864 by James Munson, James and William Allred and about 4 other men after a call by Brigham Young to settle the place called Circle Valley.

In 1851 President Brigham Young traveled from Manti, Utah, up the Sevier River to Parowan, and then over the mountains to several valleys looking for sites he wanted to colonize. In 1864 Brigham instructed Orson Hyde to call men from Ephriam and Manti to leave their homes and farms and go 100 miles further south along the Old Spanish trail and settle a place called Circle Valley. It was a well-organized venture and men were chosen to represent many trades, so they could be as self sufficient as possible.

In the next 2 years about 40 families settled in the Valley. They renamed this valley, Circleville because of the almost perfect circle of mountains surrounding them. In 1866, The Black Hawk War with the Indians drove them out of the settlement. (More about this war later) The evacuation of Circleville took place on June 20, 1866 with most of the people going north to Sanpete County. A few crossed the mountains to Beaver and Fillmore. The valley remained vacant until sometime in 1869. We believe that while in Beaver the family of Charles Wakeman Dalton heard about this beautiful valley that these early settlers talked about. The first Mormon settler to resettle to Circleville was Charles W. Dalton, who came in 1874 with his first wife, Julietta Bowen. He was followed soon by his sons, Charles Albert and Orson Dalton and their families, and later by his plural wife, Elizabeth Dalton, with her family. When Charles A. Dalton arrived with his family in 1875, he found only four families living there. Later settlers were the following families:

Smith, Wiley, Whittaker, Parker, Gillis, Simkin, Thompson, Lewis, Nay, Price, Davis, Chaffin, Ruby, Fox, Lambson, Alexander, Dobson, Allen, Knight, McDonough, Ritchie, Thomas, Westwood. Wiltshire, Yakeley, Morrill, Sudweeks, Mansor, Meeks, Johnson, Morgan, Applegate, Mangum, Beebe, Duttson and Button Families.

Martins’ father, Charles W. Dalton owned a large ranch, north and east of town, and had a large orchard that was in the mouth of the canyon to the south.

The first school taught in Circleville was by Miss Henrietta Pearson, in a small log house. Martin Carrell Dalton Sr., Ed Fullmer and Charles A. Dalton were some of her first students. After Charles A. Dalton grew up and married he donated two acres of land for a new school and meeting house.

In 1887, the first L. D. S Ward was set up in Circleville with James E. Peterson ordained the first Bishop. The first store in Circleville was at the Whittaker ranch, three miles west of the schoolhouse. The people in general were poor, with few of the comforts of life. Often in the spring, the wind blew so hard that sand storms removed the seed out of the ground, and in certain localities it had been necessary to replant two and three times. This was especially true in the northeast part of the valley where Henry Fox lived. Henry Fox and his sons dug and put into use a main water supply, south of town, which was named the Fox Canal.

Circleville also boasts of one of their own, the famous George Leroy Parker, better known as Butch Cassidy, who spent a few years there during the 1870’s and 1880’s. His boyhood cabin still stands, near U.S. 89, two miles south of town.

This same little valley was where Martin Carrell Dalton Sr. would spend the rest of his life with his family. The most important events that came into the lives of Martin C. Dalton and his wife Charlotte were the births of their children. They were tenderly nurtured and given the best their parents could afford. It was on June 16th, 1909, when their youngest daughter, Mary Irene Dalton and James Lester Peterson were married in the Manti Temple. Martin and Charlotte went with them and were also married in the temple and had their children sealed to them.

They also must have suffered much pain in the loss of three of their children. James Christopher, born on the 11th of Nov. and died on the 28th of Nov. 1896. They raised two sons to adulthood, only to have them taken from them at the young age of 21 and 22. Taylor Dalton was born on the 8th of April 1900 and died of Bright’s Disease on Sept. 5th, 1921. Francis Dalton was born on Feb. 5th 1902 and died July 6th, 1924. He was injured by a stick of dynamite going off in his hands while helping to set off the early morning bomb to celebrate the 4th of July 1924. He lived two days with one of his hands completely blown off and a large hole in his stomach. His death on July 6, 1924 saddened the entire town of Circleville, and for many years thereafter, in honor and respect for his parents the early morning bomb on the 4th of July was discontinued. As if this tragedy was not enough for Martin Carrell and Charlotte to bear, their daughter Mary Irene’s husband, James Lester Peterson died leaving their daughter with four small children, Una 10 years, Ralph 8 years, Gala 3 years and a baby, Harvey 1 year old. A daughter, Vera Nellie Dalton wrote; "My father was a kind, generous, easy going person, who loved his wife and children. He would have given us the world if it had been his to give. When he thought you needing correcting he would send you outside with his pocket knife to cut a nice green willow from a tree, and when you came back in he would say, "well now! I know you didn’t mean to do this thing, so I won’t use this willow now, but I will put this willow up behind this picture on the wall to remind you that you’ve been bad and if you do it again I’ll really use it on you". I can’t think of a time that he ever used it on us".

The first home Martin C. Dalton, mostly called "Mart", and his wife, Charlotte, lovingly called "Nellie" had was a little log cabin that stood where the James L. Whittaker home is at the present time. In about 1899, Martin C. Dalton’s brother Orson had a big brick two-story house that he sold to Martin. It was not completely finished at this time, however, and Martin Carrell spent the next few years finishing the large and very nice home. The parlor was completely carpeted and had a matching set of beautiful upholstered furniture. It also had a organ, one of the few in town. This room was kept special for company. This home was also one of the first in Circleville to have acetylene or carbide lights. Everyone else was using coal-oil lamps.

Also at this time a dance hall, first owned by his brother Orson Dalton was sold to him along with the home. Along with this home that grandfather bought at this time was a square mile of land, some farming ground and some pasture land.

In about 1892, Orson Dalton had built this dance hall. It was made of lumber with a stage in one end. It has been said that this was the largest dance hall south of Spanish Fork. This hall was rented for dances as a private enterprise. People of all ages, including most of the population, were in attendance at dances. They came by team with wagons and white tops from the settlements of Junction, Kingston and Coyote, now known as Antimony, to enjoy dancing and mingle with the people of Circleville. Babies were sleeping on blankets placed on the front of the stage. Small children were usually quiet, soothed by the sweet strains of music. Musicians were few in numbers. There was Jimmy Nielson from Sevier County who played the violin and in company with a musician, who played the guitar, they traveled from one settlement to another playing music for dances. Sometimes they played in Circleville. Music for dances for a number of years was played by Ezra Bird with the piccolo; Thomas Thomas, the guitar; Will Thomas, the violin, and Lorin Fullmer, the organ. Later a piano was bought and was played by Lorin Fullmer.


Most of the dances in Circleville were held in the Dalton Hall for a number of years. The people were becoming more prosperous and some of the leading men in the community decided to build a better dance hall on a co-op basis. Stock was sold to local people and a large rustic hall was built. The dance floor was about forty by seventy feet with a large stage in one end for dramatic plays and a stage for the band at about the center of one side. Painted a light gray color on the outside, inside walls were finished with plaster with an elaborate ceiling. This stately building contained a basement that was used for banquets when a dance and supper was featured. It was across the street from the home where Tex Grigsby lives now. People would come from miles around to dance, sometimes until early morning. At times they would pay for their tickets with vegetables and other kinds of produce. This was also the place that Stock Companies, traveling through the county would put on their plays. The hall had a stage and two sets of scenery, one for outside scenes and one for inside scenes. It had a large curtain that roller up. It was the place also that the town Christmas parties were held. Martin Carrell also was musically inclined. He and his daughter, Vera used to sing together at many of the community activities. Later when a newer Social Hall was build in another part of town, Martin Carrell then put barrels full of roller skates in his building and rolling staking become the most popular sport of young and old for a long time. Finally this fine old Dalton Hall that had served the town’s activities for so long became a barn that housed the many horses that Martin Carrell owned. He always had many good saddle horses for his children and grandchildren to ride. He also owned the fastest racehorse in the County, called Red Cloud. Red Cloud raced all over Utah and beat everyone he ever came up against.

Martin C. Dalton Sr. also owned a store he called the "Equitable." When the railroad came into Marysvale, north of Circleville, Martin Carrell would take his team and wagon and go to Marysvale to get his supplies. Once he slipped while hauling supplies and fell from his wagon, injuring his leg badly. He suffered pain in this leg for the rest of his life

.

In 1915, when James E. Peterson decided to move his family to Leadore Idaho. Charlotte Dalton’s brother also was moving and some of Martin Carrell’s family wanted to move with them. Martin refused to do so, and thereby changed his future descendant’s fate.

Martin Carrell Dalton Sr. was a very hard worker and was always busy. He spent a lot of his time in the mountains surrounding Circleville. He lived in the ranger station houses on Big Flat, Dry Flat and Tushar Mountain, when he was working for the Forest Service as a guard. He herded sheep and cattle not only for himself, but also for many ranchers and farmers around the valley. He shared his home with many people, Stake Presidents and dignitaries of the Church when they come to Circleville to visit or hold Stake Conferences. It was always a special treat for Martin to sit in a rocking chair in front of the fireplace with one of his grandchildren in his arms singing to them.

This Dalton home has been occupied by some member of the Dalton family for over 75 years.

Martin Carrell Dalton Sr. was taken ill in 1936. He developed pneumonia and it was more than he could shake off. His wife "Nellie" was by his bedside constantly day and night. If she left for a moment he would say "where’s Nellie, I need her". On Dec. 18, 1936 he passed away in this grand old home of his at the age of sixty-nine. He is buried in the Circleville Cemetery. His beloved wife Charlotte was buried next to him five years later.

Here is a time line of Martin Carrell Dalton Sr.’s life in Circleville Utah:

Source: From a history of Piute County; by Ardis Parshall of Orem Utah.

Baptized and confirmed, 6 June 1909, by James E. Peterson; ordained an elder, 13 March 1909, by Joseph F. Heywood. Temple sealing 16 June 1909.

1880 - Laborer; living in Circle Valley Precinct.

29 January 1889: Of Circleville. Wedding performed by James Wiley, justice of the peace; witnesses: M.D. Morgan and Elvira Dalton.

1902 – Sept. 5, has credentials as Circleville representative at county
Republican convention. Elected as alternate representative to state
convention in Ogden Utah

1903- August 5, Signed petition asking County Commission to consolidate
Circleville and Lost Creek School Districts, claiming that neither district "is able to build a school house of sufficient capacity to accommodate all the children of their respective districts, nor to grade the scholars according to their merits, resulting in the holding back of children that ought to be advanced, for their slower going class mates."


1903-04 - Of Circleville; constable.

1903-04 - Farming 274 acres (value: $3,240), at Circleville.

1908-09 - Farming 251 acres (value: $3,205), in Circleville.

1911-12 - Of Circleville; dealer in general merchandise.

1916-17 - Farming 20 acres (value: $440), at Circleville.

1918- Nov. 5, Circleville:

The homes of Geo. Fox, J.R. Norton and Carrell Dalton, are under quarantine on account of the prevalence of the influenza. Those afflicted are not seriously sick and it is believed that with the lifting of the quarantine at these homes, Circleville will be about clear of  the disease.

1918-1919, Farming 20 acres (value: $300), at Circleville.

1918 – Nov. 18, Subscribed for bonds "of the fourth issue" (World War I war bonds), at Circleville.

1920 - Farmer, home farm; living in Circleville; can read and write.

1920-21 - Farming 138 acres (value: $5305), at Circleville.

1922-23 - Farming 439 acres (value: $6,735), at Circleville.

1924-25 - Farming 173 acres (value: $9,923), at Circleville.

1927- March 25, Carroll Dalton is busily remodeling his old home on the highway. He intends to move in as soon as the reconstruction is completed.

As you have read in the preceding record of March 25, 1927, it seems like Martin C. Dalton was having financial problems with his large two-story home in West Circleville.

He did finish the reconstruction on his home on Highway 89 and sold his big home to another Dalton family member. It was in the small bedroom in the attic of this house on the highway that Martin Carrell’s great-grand son, Rodney Dalton was born in 1938.

Below is an article from the Salt Lake Tribune that shows our Martin Carrel Dalton Sr. as being call as a juror in a trial in Junction Utah.

Jurors in the Mills Case:

Junction, Sept. 9 - The names of those who appeared this morning at 9 o'clock as jurors in the Mills murder case from the issuance of the open venire were: D.S. Gilles, William Hike, Alma Jensen, John Barnson, J.E. Peterson, D.B. Brown, A.M. Lamborn, Chris Kotkie, J.E. Keitch, M.C. Dalton, J. Hilend and Josiah Nichales. Out of this number only two were retained; they were Chris Kotkie and J.E. Peterson. This swelled the number of jurors to nine, and again exhausted the jury box. Thereupon the old venire was destroyed and a new one issued returnable forthwith.

Source: Salt Lake Tribune, 11 September 1897.

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25– Martin Carrell Dalton Jr., 1889 -1961:

The first son of Martin Carrell Dalton Sr. and Charlotte Ellen Whittaker.

Martin Carrell Dalton Jr. was born on May 1, 1889 in Circleville, Utah, the first child of Martin Carrell Dalton Sr. and Charlotte Ellen Whittaker. Martin C. Dalton Jr. married Iva Sarah Lucinda Veater on Dec. 23, 1912 in Junction, Piute Co. Utah. He was nineteen and she was seventeen. Seven children were born to them:

1-Afton Garrenta, born Aug. 12 1913.

2-Iris Urada, born March 14 1915.

3-Garth Carrell, born Sept. 19 1917.

4-Francis Cecil, born Feb. 25 1920.

5-Rhea Druce, born Oct. 17 1922.

6-Taylor Boyd, born Dec. 5 1924.

7-Sybil Joy, born Sept. 22 1927.

Most of these children were born in a little log house with a lean-to kitchen, build near the Sevier River. The little log house is still standing, but it is the center of a cement home that was built around it by James L. Whittaker.

Martin C. Dalton Jr. was a very quite and reserved man. He had clear gray eyes and light brown hair. He stood 5’ 10" tall and normally weighed around 165 lbs. Martin Jr. grew up in Circleville doing the things that children do in a small town everywhere. He had to do chores, because his father was a very hard worker and expected his sons and daughters to help carry the load and do the same. It was very tough on the little family of Dalton's in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. School and church played a large part in the development of young Martin Jr.

When Martin Jr. was a young man his father owned a roller-skating rink and Martin Jr. and his sister Vera spent a great amount of their spare time practicing some fancy steps and they won many contests. Sometimes a whole string of skaters would take hold of hands, then Martin Jr. would take them, oh ever so fast and then pop them off and away they would go in all directions trying to right themselves.

Martin C. Dalton Jr. also loved horses and always had a good saddle horse to ride. The Dalton’s owned two of the fastest racehorses in the country. His father Martin Sr. gave him his big red stallion called Red Cloud. Martin Jr. helped to train him, and rode him in races at the county fairs around Southern Utah. Martin Jr. had a great love for this horse, and they understood each other perfectly.

They sold his beloved racehorse Red Cloud and used the money to expand this little house because their family was growing and more room was needed. Their home was on a large corner lot fronting on Highway 89, and Martin Jr. planted a large garden on one side and had many fruit trees to the west and south. In the fall friends and neighbors came to see all the things that had been harvested from their garden and orchard. This old house is still standing at the south end of Circleville.

In 1942, the Second World War had broken out and times were tough for Martin Jr. and his family so they moved to Las Vegas to find work. They lived in Las Vegas for a few years with Martin Jr. working at several jobs, but his heart was still in the little valley where he grew up. He missed the mountains and a good horse to ride. He worried about his sons growing up in a large city. He missed the security of their own home in Circleville and all the things he had grown to love in it. He become very ill and Iva had to take him home to Circleville.

Rodney Dalton remembers his grandfather:
“When I was a young boy of about 10 or so, I remember a few visits to my grandparents house in Circleville. My dad would load up the old car he owned at the time, (Can’t remember the kind or year) for the long trip to Circleville. Remember at this time about 1949-50 the roads went through every small town from Ogden to Circleville. This was Highway 89. This trip took us all day. After we arrived late at night, my grandmother Dalton would have a very good meal waiting for us. I remember having to sleep with some of my cousins in the same bed. They were a little older than me, so I got the inside of the bed against the wall. Well I can tell I didn’t get much sleep!

The old abandoned Martin C. Jr. Dalton house on the bend of highway 89 in Circleville Utah.
Rodney Dalton was born upstairs in the remodeled attic in 1938.

The one thing I remember the most about my visits was my grandfather Dalton’s pacing up and down the floors in his house, his was talking to himself and I through he was swearing and cursing us kids. Later on I was told that he was sick and I never seen him again until me and my dad visited him years later in the Utah State Hospital in Provo.”

Martin seem to improve for a while, but then he become unmanageable after awhile, so Iva had no other choice but to put him in the Hospital in Provo. Garth C. Dalton, his son come down to Provo from Ogden, Utah to visit a few times and Rodney G Dalton, one of Martin Jr. Grandsons come to visit him also. His wife went back to Las Vegas to be near her children who had settled there. Iva Dalton was a devoted wife and she would make the long trip to Provo when she could, along with some of her children to visit with Martin. She worked at many jobs in Las Vegas to help support herself. She took sick in 1960 and died on Oct. 29th, 1960.”

Her children brought her home to Circleville to stay and she is buried in the Circleville cemetery. On Jan. 29th 1961, Martin Carrell Dalton Jr. passed away in the Provo Hospital and was brought home to the Valley he loved so much. He is buried next to his wonderful wife in the Circleville Cemetery.

The Circleville Utah Cemetery
There are a lot of our Dalton’s and they’re related families buried here.

Here is a time line of Martin Carrell Dalton Jr’s life in Circleville Utah:

Source: From a history of Piute County; by Ardis Parshall of Orem Utah.

Martin C. Dalton Jr. was baptized 6 September 1902, by Laban D. Morrill; Confirmed 7 September 1902, by Jorgen P. Jensen; ordained a deacon, 9 July 1908, by James E. Peterson.

1916-17 - Farming 20 acres (value: $440), at Circleville.

5 September 1918 - Of Circleville; real property on delinquent tax list to be redeemed or sold on 16 December 1918.

7 September 1939 - A horse race met was held on Friday afternoon. Considerable excitement was created in the second race, between Marcus, owned by Blake Robinson of Junction, and Pancho, owned by Jack Perkins of Spry, with Basil Lay of Marysvale up on Marcus, and Carrol Dalton up on Pancho. Dalton took an airplane-spin, landing about forty feet in a field. He received several broken ribs, a broken leg, and a lacerated and bruised wrist. He was attended by Dr. K.L. Jenkins, and later went to Richfield for X-ray pictures. The most creditable account of the accident seemed to be that a black dog, which had been following horses in the previous race, had darted out at the horses. Lay was uninjured. Dalton is reported to be recovering.

 

Highway 89 looking South at the Circleville sign.

 

Obituary of Martin Dalton Jr.
Funeral services for 65-year-old Martin Carrell Dalton Jr., former Las Vegas resident and father of four Las Vegans, will be held at 2 pm. Saturday in the LDS Church in Circleville, Utah, with Bishop Stanley Dalton, a distant relative, officiating. Mr. Dalton, a semi-retired farmer and member of the LDS Church, died last Saturday in the Provo Hospital, Prove Utah, after a long illness. Burial will be in Circleville Cemetery. A 10-year Las Vegas, Mr. Dalton lived here from 1941 to 1951. He was living in Provo, Utah however at the time of the illness that led to his death. He was born in Circleville, Utah on May 1, 1895. Mr. Dalton is surveyed by a son, Taylor B. Dalton and three daughters, Mrs. Granite Thomas, Mrs. Rhea Mortensen and Mrs. Sybill Edvelson, all of Las Vegas. Also surviving Mr. Dalton, whose wife, Iva, died only three months before him, are two other sons, Garth, of Ogden Utah, and Cecil of Salt Lake City; another daughter, Mrs. Uarda Fullmer of Phoenix; 28 grandchildren.

Source: Copied from a Las Vegas newspaper by Rodney G. Dalton.

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The history of Iva Sarah Veater Dalton:

Grandmother, Iva Sarah Veater was born on August 20, 1896, at Orton, Garfield County Utah. She was the baby of the family, and thirteen years younger than her brother Carl. She had dark hair, clear blue eyes, a small frame, and a sunny disposition; to know her was to love her.

Iva was blessed and given her name on May 2. Iva was baptized on November 3, 1906, by Benjamin Cameron Jr. and confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- day Saints by James B. Heywood. She was the sixth child of James Veater and Sarah Louisa Howd.

Her father, James Veater owed a ranch south of Circleville. The Veater ranch was at Spry, fifteen miles north of Panguitch on the Sevier River. This was the most popular and up to date one in the county, as it was located on the highway from Southern Utah to Salt Lake City. This highway is now known as Highway 89. This ranch made tons of excellent cheese and butter which was shipped to Salt Lake City markets and all over the country. It was also a large cattle ranch and a hotel, where travelers made it a point to stay. This ranch was the stopping place for the old horse and buggy mail line from Panguitch to Marysvale.

Iva's first memories of life on the Veater Ranch at Spry were when she was about three years old. She remembers when her brother, Carl, received a Shetland pony for his birthday, and he would have Mother hold her on the pony while Carl would lead the pony around and around the outside buildings. Later memories were that he never seemed to tire of playing games with her. He taught her how to ride a horse, and how to make corncob dolls using the corn silk for the hair. He taught her how to remove an egg from the brooding chicken's nest without getting pecked. He taught her to put a worm on a fishing hook, and how to catch pollywogs. He also taught her a little poem that many years later she would teach to her own children.

Soap making was a very necessary chore that took place at least once a year at the Veater ranch. After the pork grease had been rendered, and the lye had been made from wood ashes or had been purchased, Iva's father would send word to Circleville, for Bish or Howd or Carl, and their families to come home to help their mother with the soap making. The family's help was needed because the soap was made in a large heavy iron kettle that was hung over a wood burning fire outside. The kettle was very heavy. This was always a happy occasion for Iva. This meant that she would have her nephews and nieces to play with, and she would enjoy all the attention that her older brothers would shower on her. Iva's mother remarked often that "it wasn't Mother and Father that spoiled Iva, it was her sisters and her brothers and their wives." Everyone loved their baby sister.

Iva learned to help her mother in the kitchen at an early age. Their mother's time was not spent on fancy foods, but her cupboards were filled with all sorts of bottled fruits, vegetables pickles, preserves, and kegs of sauerkraut, and always, there was a pleasing aroma of foods being prepared for the freighters, mailmen, and travelers. In the kitchen, often you could smell the soft pungent aroma of freshly baked bread, biscuits, doughnuts, cakes, and pies. Iva's mother kept most of these delicious baked foods high upon the cupboard shelf in the pantry. Her famous Chewy Ginger Snap Cookies, however, rested in a gray stone cookie jar on the lowest pantry shelf. They fairly oozed with ginger and were off limits to her children, friends, and boarders.

One of the chores that Iva had in the summertime was to take the milk cows to the pastures where they could eat the tall, sweet grass and clover and drink the cool water. Then, in the early evening, she would go back and drive them to the barn, where the men folk would milk them. She loved to watch her pet tomcat "Charlie" follow close at the milker's heels to get his share of the sweet, warm milk before it was strained and placed in the shallow pans in the milk cellar for the cream to rise.

Making the cheese and butter was a very important job on the ranch, as this was where they made their cash. The Veaters were known for making the very best cheese and butter. Each child took on the very important responsibility of helping their mother with this work as long as they lived on the ranch. Iva's job was to wrap the cheese in a soft clean oiled cloth, and then to store it in large crackpots until they had made enough cheese and butter to take-to the mining towns or to the larger cities to sell. She also helped her mother make the sweet, fragrant cream into delicious butter. They would take turns working the dasher up and down, with firm pulsating pace, until the milk from the cream would separate and then to butter brake. Then, after the very last nuggets had been gleaned from the wooden churn, they would place the special “Veater" stamp on each pound of butter.

Iva loved to be with her father. She would go with him to cut the sweet-smelling meadow hay, and to catch frogs. Frog's legs were a delicacy that were much in demand by the traveling people who would stop by the ranch for nice meal and comfortable lodging. Iva could hardly wait until she was old enough to attend school where she could have other children to play with at recess. She attended the little Spry School with Miss Dean Sudweeks as the teacher. The children were all different ages, and studied subjects suitable to their ages. Iva was thrilled when she started to read the McGuffy Reader Books. One of the first stories was Mary Had A Little Lamb. She felt that this was very special, as she had a pet lamb at home. She loved it when the children would stand and pledge allegiance to the flag. Sometimes the children would be assigned to memorize a short poem or a scripture; these were called "Memory Gems."

By the sixth grade of school, Iva had outgrown the little school in Spry. It was decided that she should go to Circleville. She could live with Carl and Minnie. She attended the old rock school and the teacher was Thomas Howell.

It wasn't long until she noticed a handsome young man whose name was Martin Carrell Dalton Jr. Carrell was the oldest son of a family of six boys and two girls.

Iva and Martin Carrell Dalton were married on December 23, 1912, at Junction, Piute County Utah. He was nineteen, and she was seventeen. To this happy union came seven children. They are: Afton Garneta, Iris Uarda, Carrell Garth, France Cecil, Rhea Druce, Taylor Boyd and Syble Joy.

Carrell loved to get a crowd of boys and girls together and a corral full of calves or colts to rope and ride. He had many bad cuts and broken ribs as a result of these activities, but he still thought it was fun. He broke many an untamed horse so that it could be ridden, while he was a young lad. While he was a young man, his father gave him a big, red racehorse and he was named Red Cloud by Carrell. This horse had a great love for Carrell, who trained him and rode him in many a horse race around Southern Utah. Carrell also had a great love for this horse; they understood each other perfectly. Many who knew Carrell said that they never remember the horse ever losing a race when Carrell was the jockey.

Carrel's parents owned a roller skating rink. Skating was a very popular sport at that time. They would let him invite a crowd of his young friends to go in and skate for free between nights of regular skating time. Carrell and Iva spent a great amount of their spare time practicing some fancy steps and they won many contests.

Carrell's parents also owned a little country store, and the first Community Hall to be built as such, in the Valley. People would come from miles around and dance until morning, paying their tickets with vegetables or some kind of produce.

Christmas parties were also held in the Community Hall where, after a good program, there would be treats for everyone and a gift on the Community Christmas Tree for all the children. These were happy times for Carrell and Iva.

Their first home was a two-room log home, and after Cecil was born, they decided to sell Red Cloud and use the money to add more rooms on to their home.

Carrell was always proud of his wife's ability to keep a clean, well-organized home. She was also a very good seamstress and an excellent cook. When he wanted to pay her a compliment, he would say to his friends, "Iva can make a silk pulse out of a pig's ear."

He loved to take his friends and neighbors down to the basement of their home, in the fall of the year after the garden and the orchard had been harvested and the foodstuff had been bottled and preserved. There were peaches, pears, plums, apple sauce, apple butter, jellies, preserves, all kinds of vegetables and meats, with plenty of dill and sweet pickles and sauerkraut in large crock pots. All these things Iva had learned to preserve while she was a small girl, working at her mother's side on the Veater Ranch.

Source:
Carl Veater - Grandson.

**************************************************************

The History of Charles Albert Dalton:

Source:
Taken from the Dalton Family History Book, by Donald C. Whittaker.

“Charles Albert Dalton was born on the banks of the Sweetwater River at Devil's Gate, Wyoming 26 August 1849. His family was migrating to Utah. His parents were Charles Wakeman and Juliet Bowen Dalton. Sarah Jane was born 23 June l953, when Cedar City was just two years old and shortly after the settlers had moved into the new fort. Her parents were Robert and Sarah Darling Wiley. She was the 8th in a family of 9. She was the first child born after her family came to Utah. Robert Wiley was baptized in England in 1842.

Charles Albert and Sarah Jane Wiley were married 9 October 1870 in Beaver County, Utah, and were the second settlers to move to Circleville in 1875. They homesteaded 640 acres of the prime grassland pasture. They also owned 40 acres of city property, described as beginning at 450 North 100 East, thence easterly to 400 East, thence south to 100 North, thence west to 100 East, thence North to 450 North. It was the Northwest 2 acres of this land that Charles A. donated for a school & church building site.

Note:
Read the history of Sarah Jane Wiley’s father, Robert Wiley at the end of this Chapter.

Charles A. liked to smoke a clay pipe. It is rumored that he traded a large tract of land for this pipe, which he smoked until he died in 1936.

Charles Albert also liked alcohol, and this habit ruled his life. He freighted lumber from the Oak Basin Sawmill that was owned and operated by Bishop James E. Peterson to

the mining camps in Milford. His son Charles Robert often had to make the trips with him and sometimes for him driving the "8 up" span of mules.

Charles Albert ran the Mail Route from the railroad in Marysvale to Thompsonville, Alunite, Junction, Kingston, Antimony, Angle, Circleville, and Panguitch. It is reported that he had a very reliable team that knew the route well enough to make the trip unassisted. Charles A. would sometimes wake up long enough to deliver the mail, or the postmaster would come out and get his pouch and the buggy would roll on with the driver passed out.

Charles Albert was one of the first to own a Model T Ford. He parked it by the post office one day and was promptly told that he had better move it because the horse tied there would kick. Sure enough, the horse did kick the side of his car and the car wore the dent the rest of its useful life.

Sarah Jane Wiley Dalton (her mother's name was "Darling" and it fit Sarah Jane) a special personality that everyone loved and enjoyed being around. She had an excellent memory and could, with computer accuracy, remember events and dates and recall any lost bit of information. The children even enjoyed visiting with "Grandma Great" Dalton. She made them feel very comfortable and conversed with them on their level. She was a devout Latter-day Saint and set an example for her posterity.

When John Darling died, Sarah Jane (age 10) went to England with her mother Sarah Darling Wiley for the reading of the will. John Darling was supposed to be quite wealthy, but he only left Sarah an old trunk filled with letters. It was too heavy to take back to Utah.

My grandparents on my father's side were Charles Albert Dalton and Sarah Jane Wiley. They were married in the Beaver area and they came as married people from Beaver over to Circleville in 1887. They were among the early settlers in Circleville. My grandfather homestead a hundred and sixty-acre plot in what became, in later years, the center part of Circleville. In those days it was all sagebrush and they had to grub the sagebrush off in order to make farming land or pasture out of the land. Some of the land was unimproved even as I was a young boy. We sure did like to go to that part that was still in sagebrush and willows and bull berry bushes for Easter. I remember that quite a few times we were there for Easter, some of our friends came and we had a really good Easter party together.

We would play "Run My Sheep Run", "Hide and Seek", and "Search For The Missing Articles" in that part of the wasteland of grandpa's farm. Sometimes other people would come in and of course we were a little bashful and sometimes we left when they came to spend their Easter in that area. We sure had a lot of fun there because it was out where no one disturbed us, we could do al I the things we wanted to, and make all the noise we wanted to.

My grandparents on my mother's side were James Ephraim Peterson and Caroline Gottfredson. They were married in St. George Temple. They came to what was called then Spring Creek (later known as Angle). My grandfather tried to engage in farming in that area but the water was quite short in the summer time, It was really hard to get enough water to mature their crops. Then he was called by the church authorities to come to Circleville and become the Bishop of Circleville Ward. He came to Circleville in the early part of its settlement. He also had a farm here but in the north and western part of Circleville. There was where he raised his family. He also had a store that he had there near his home. He and some of his children run the store and as his children grew up he turned over the management of the store to the children while he did other things. He was also Postmaster for many years in Circleville. He had his children run the post office as well as operated the store.

In the early days it was really hard to make a living and Grandfather Peterson tried a number of things before he decided he would leave Circleville and go to Idaho. When he went to Idaho he lived in the vicinity of Leadore, Idaho on a ranch in the higher mountains. The winters got so cold that he had to move his family in the wintertime, from the high mountain area where his ranch was, down into Leadore Idaho. As he grew older and was unable to farm any longer, he moved down into Leadore and lived there. He was unable to pay for his farm and lost the farm. But he spent the rest of his life in Leadore Idaho. He had a young daughter that stayed and lived there after he passed away. Her name was Leda Peterson Dalby, and she is the one that kept and collected the genealogy of my grandfather Peterson's family.

My grandfather Charles Albert Dalton, in the early part of his life in Circleville, carried the mail from Marysvale to Panquitch. One day he would go from Circleville to Marysvale and get the mail and then come back to Circleville. He did his mail carrying in a small buggy pulled by two horses, then he would make the trip to Panquitch and deliver the mail in Panguitch the day after he had gotten it in Marysvale. So every other day he got the mail delivered to Panguitch, every other day he got the mail from Marysvale. That kept him occupied almost all the time. Even though it was really hard and difficult in the wintertime, it was the best means he had found to provide the necessary things for his family.

He did this until he grew quite old and was unable to carry the mail any longer. Then he came and worked with the farm and a few cows and a few sheep, and made his living as best he could without as much exposure to the cold weather. He grew quite old before he passed away. He became somewhat crippled up in his hands and his legs and we always kinda felt sorry for him as he tried to walk and do the things that were difficult for him.

My father's name is Charles Robert Dalton. He is the oldest living son of my grandparents because the two older children (boys) died while small infants. He grew up as a boy on the estate that grandfather had built his home on. My father as a boy rode a pony to get to school. In those days the school was in the lower part of Circleville, so he would ride the pony down to school and at the end of the day ride the pony back. My mother, Virginia Peterson, was close enough to school so she was able to walk to school. They were educated in a one-room school (at the time they were growing up that was all that they had)

All the boys and girls went into that one room whether they were little or big and one teacher taught all the classes. My father said that it was quite hard sometimes to keep your mind on what you were studying because sometimes you were listening to what went on in the other grades of the school. But they learned a great deal while in that school and it helped him to meet his obligations and do the things that were necessary in his later life. They got by in those schools and learned the fundamentals of the rudiments of math, english, geography, and history so that they had a pretty good country education when they got out and graduated from what was then the eight grade. That gave them about eight years in school in their younger years. There wasn't any high school in our area at that time and our parents were not given the opportunity to gain a high school education.

Their education largely came as they grew up, and with their experiences in life, they learned a lot of things that they didn't learn in school. It has been said that experience keeps a dear school and in our day a great many lessons are learned in the school of experience. Experience is a good teacher because it helps you to be able to adjust to new circumstances and new conditions and appreciate your blessings as they came along.

My mother and her younger brother were assigned the responsibility of taking the cows up to what was called the bench, out west of town. They had to drive the cows about a mile and half through the lanes to get up to the land that wasn't a part peoples farms. One day while they were driving the cows, the cows found a gap in the fence and got into an alfalfa field. It was the spring of the year, the cows were hungry, and the alfalfa was just high enough for the cows to get a right good bite of it. They tried as best they could but there was just no way they could get those hungry cows out of that alfalfa field until one of them had keeled over and was dead. This broke the hearts of the children to such a degree (the cow was so essential for them to get the food they needed and a means of providing for the family) that they felt like the loss was just overwhelming. So mother and her younger brother knelt down and ask the Lord to bring the cow back to life. The Lord rewarded the faith of those little children. The cow started to breath again and after a few minutes it got up, walked out of the gap where they couldn't force it to go out of before, and joined the other cows. They took the cows up to the bench and that cow lived for several years after that. Mother always bore a testimony that she knew her prayer was answered by our Father in Heaven and he raised that cow back to life in response to that prayer they had offered.

My Mother was the person that really had a lot of faith. She was really the spiritual leader in our home. Lots of time she would get up early in the morning when we needed to go to Sunday School and she would get all of the children ready and we would drive to Sunday School in the little black topped buggy.

In those days that buggy was pulled by one horse, in what we called a par of shafts. The horse was placed in those shafts and that was what, as we guided the horse, guided the buggy. One day the wind was blowing awfully hard and that horse got scared of something and ran away. Delbert, my older brother, and my mother were trying to hold the horse. But it kept going and running, in order to follow the course it was going on: it had to cross a ruff ditch. When it crossed that ruff ditch Mother and Delbert were thrown out of the buggy, and that left the rest of us kids still riding the buggy. The horse kept running and since I was the oldest child there I kept trying to get the younger kids to jump out of the buggy so they wouldn't get more seriously hurt. Every time one would climb out it would fall down because of the speed that the buggy was going and when they hit the ground they couldn't keep their balance. I had them all out but two by the time that the horse was stopped. A man by the name of Billy Mansor saw that the horse was running away and that there was no one in the buggy to drive it, so he jumped over the fence, stopped the horse and tied it up to the fence. I was sure thankful that he was able to get it stopped because i didn't know exactly what was going to happen to the rest of us that hadn't got out of the buggy. When I saw that everything was all right, I got the other two children out of the buggy and walked back to see what had happened to mother. She had been quite badly bruised but she hadn't had any broken bones. Grandmother Peterson took her into her homeland she was laying on the bed. It took a day or two before she was able to come home but we were sure thankful that she hadn't been more seriously hurt.

Our mother was really the person that taught us great many of the lessons that we valued in life. She taught us how to work and how to do the things that needed to be done in the home. Each one of us as a child had a responsibility that we had to do every morning and every night. We knew t hat was ours and we accepted that responsibility and did that thing without any one having to ask or prod us to do the job. That was a great experience. As young people we learned patience, we learned industry, and we learned to cope with difficulties. Every once in a while something would go wrong and we had to find our own solution for solving the problem. It has been a great help to us all our lives.

We can credit our mother for the religious training of our family. Our father didn't feel he had the time, at that time, to take much time with the members of the family. He was a good worker and a good provider but we received a great deal more of the training from our mother than we did from our father.

One of the saddest things in my life was the passing of my mother when I was 16 years old. When Arthur, the youngest son, was born, she bled to death and died during the night. Father came and woke me up to go and get Olive Norton, who was a midwife, to come at that time, and when I got back I was released from my errand and I went up and went to bed. I didn't know that Mother had died until I got up that next morning. Most of my heart died with my mother. It was years and years before I really felt like I could go on and face life alone because I missed her so much. She was my ideal and she was really the one who gave me encouragement when things got tough, she gave me counsel and guidance. I never will be able to fully replace her and I am looking forward to a time when we will be together again.

My father was a farmer in the early period of my life. He tells a story about the time when I was born. I was born at two o’clock in the afternoon. He had been working preparing so he would be with mother during that time. She took sick during the night, but it was two o'clock before I came into the world. I came in on the 11th of July in 1901. I have always regretted that I was born in July because I have always faced either a water turn or harvesting a hay crop on my birthday. I have really celebrated a lot of birthdays tromping hay in the field, or tending water with a water turn during my life time. If I had my choice again I would be born in October or November, and not in July. But sometimes we don't have our choice. Father always use to tell me that it had cost him a very important water turn to get me into the world, and now I owed a quite a responsibility to him to help him take care of the water turns because he had missed that one to get me into the world.”

Sarah Jane Dalton’s Obituary:

Circleville .... under the direction of the Ward Bishopric ... services were held here Wednesday afternoon for another of Circleville's pioneers. Mrs. Sarah Jane Wiley Dalton, 85, who died at her home Sunday evening after an illness of only 36 hours. Bishop James L. Whittaker presided. The speakers were former Bishop, Henry Sudweeks, Elwood Dalton, a grandson of the deceased, and Oscar Wiltshire, another grandson who gave a sketch of her life. A tribute written by another relative, Mrs. Lola Smoot, was read by Nellie Fullmer and a tribute was given by Mrs. Ida Johnson.

The opening prayer was offered by James O. Meeks and the benediction by Ray Westwood. The grave at the Circleville Cemetery was dedicated by Irvin Allen.

Sarah Jane Dalton was a daughter of Robert and Sarah Darling Wiley and was born 23 June 1853 at Cedar City, Utah. While a small child she moved with her parents to Beaver, Utah. When she was ten years old she and her mother traveled to Liverpool, England, traveling by ox team to Salt Lake City and from there by stage coach to New York City, where they took a steamer for Liverpool. They remained in Liverpool for two years. While there Sarah attended school.

On their return trip, while awaiting a stage coach to start the long journey back to Salt Lake City, President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated and his body passed through New York to its final resting place.

They finally returned to their home in Beaver where Sarah later married Charles Albert Dalton on Oct. 9, 1870. About 1875 the young couple moved to Circleville where they spent the remainder of their lives and endured the hardships of those early days and helping to build up the community.

They were the parents of 11 children, 7 daughters and 4 sons. The members of the family have been active in Church and other public activities and have always been good citizens.

Mr. Dalton preceded his wife in death on Oct. 14, 1936. She is survived by three sons and four daughters ... Robert Dalton, Wiley Dalton, Roy Dalton .... Carolyne Wiltshire Edna Poulson, Sarah Neilsong Edna Peterson. 33 Grandchildren and 40 great-grandchildren.

(Newspaper clipping, April 8, 1938.

The below articles are about some early Circleville, Piute County, Utah history an was copied from the CD: Ancestry. Com. LDS Family History Suite 2. Pioneer Heritage Library. There is also other sources listed at the end.

Of note to the reader is that some histories of my hometown of Circleville, Utah, are long and there are many duplications from various sources. The reason I have chose to do this is because I am a history buff and I believe that the many difference sources will tell a more complete story of Circleville and its people.

The history of Circleville - Kingston: by Carrie Allen; Edited by Rodney Dalton.

In December 1863 James Munson, James T.S., and William Jackson Allred and about four other men from Ephraim, arrived in “Circle Valley” for the purpose exploring the upper reaches of the Sevier River with the view of making a settlement. They were not particularly impressed. Some felt it was too small to accommodate much of a settlement. To all, it seemed isolated and almost inaccessible. However, a call was made by President Young early in 1864 for settlers to locate in the valley. Obedient to this call some fifty families from San Pete County were selected by Apostle Orson Hyde and under his direction arrived in March 1864.

They stopped first at City Creek but deciding that it was too small, moved on to the banks of the Sevier, making their dugouts in they'll' vicinity of the present grade school. When the move was made, some of the company became discouraged and left to seek home elsewhere. Others joined later. In May of that first year, Orson Hyde visited them, held a meeting and appointed Wm. J. Allred, Presiding Elder and incorporated them members of Sevier Stake.

Surveyor, Edwin Fox arrived soon after the settlers. He surveyed a town side and farming land, allowing each family a lot and ten acres of farming ground. These plots were drawn by lots.

Planting was begun at once and considerable grain was put in that spring. It seems they settled on both sides of the river, but most of the farming land was on the East side. The first water ditch was also made on the East side. It is stated that enough wheat was raised to supply the new settlement, with necessary bread for the 'winter. James Munson and James Allred raised about three hundred bushels between them. This was a sample of what most settlers did. Some, however, didn't farm the first year but worked on roads into the canyons and a way to Beaver, which seemed to them the only opening to the south.

In the year 1849 an exploring expedition under the leadership of Parley P. Pratt following the Sevier River, came through Circle Valley. Rufus C. Allen, a member of that company told his grandson, that the undergrowth along the river was so thick that it was impossible to get their pack horses through it. In the vicinity of Dry Wash they turned west across the hills over into the Parowan Valley.

James Munson hauled logs from Cottonwood and he and James T. S. Allred built the first log meeting house in which church meetings were held from the first under the direction of W. J. Allred, Presiding Elder, with Isaac N. Behunin and Christen Jenson as Councilors.

Among the more prominent members of the community beside those previously mentioned, were Edward Tolton, Jens Anderson, Niels Anderson, Mads Nielson, Alma Allred, Harvey Ovitt, William Beal, John Beal Jr., Soren Peterson, Ivey Peterson and Peter Christensen. Only three women were included among the first group. They were Eliza Maria Munson, Annie Munson and Mrs. Ericksen. Other women came later, including a widow, Mrs. Barney and her family. They’re had been other women as far as City Creek, but they were among those who turned back.

One family that joined the settlement later was that of Samuel and Anna Marie Barnhurst. Their son the late Jim Barnhurst of Hatch was born here, August 18, 1865 in a covered wagon. Before he was a week old his mother was moved into the meeting house for fear of Indians. The only other child born here, of whom we have record is Munson Hayward, born June 5 1866. She was the daughter of James and Eliza Munson, the only 1864 pioneer family ever to return to Circleville to make their home. Mrs. Hayward and husband with their family also made their home in Circleville for a number of years.

Seemingly, settlers became discouraged and left, but others came to join the settlement and the population remained around forty families.

Before the first winter setting several good log dwellings had been built. The grain had been cut with and flailed. Hay was cut at the meadows near Marysvale. Most of it cut and stacked on the spot, to be hauled as needed during the winter.

Those desiring the luxury of real flour took their grain to Ephraim for milling; a distance of one hundred six miles by ox team. Later, in the fall of 1864 another water ditch was made on the stream an hour distance above the first east side ditch.

On February 25, 1881, Wm. Allred testified under oath that Circleville was settled March 28, 1864 and that the first irrigation ditch on the West side of the river was made in the Spring of 1865. He stated that the ditch was about six feet wide and thirty inches deep and about four hundred acres were watered from the ditch, not including the hay land. The upper ditch on the east side of the river was taken out about the first of June 1865 and three hundred acres of land were watered from it. Three other ditches were taken on the West side of the river by different parties and one from the East Fork of the Sevier River near the place where Kingston is located.

Under date of Feb. 18, 1865, Edward Tolton wrote from Circleville to the Deseret News the following statement:

"The fifty families called to settle Circle Valley under the instruction of Apostle Orson Hyde, are making a success of their settlement even though many difficulties have been encountered. They have completed four miles of canal from the river and worked ten miles of canyon road.

In two of these canyons is a good supply of excellent timber. In the other one, which runs along the Sevier River South from the valley, we have opened a road which brings us into communication with the cities of Beaver and Parowan.

At every point except this canyon the mountains appear to be inaccessible for an outlet further south.

At present the road is barely passable and will require considerable more labor to make it easy for teams, but we are sure of seeing these obstacles removed, and a great thoroughfare to the South running along this route into Dixie, at no distant day.

Several substantial homes are now completed including our meeting house, and we are now engaged in uniting our efforts to establish a school. Mr. William M. Black is making preparations to erect a good gristmill and Mr. John Reynolds intends to build a good sawmill as soon as practicable. With these desirable facilities our progress will be more rapid. These people are fully determined to demonstrate that they will attend to their own business, honor their mission and make this place a desirable location for the Saints."

Again under date of Oct. 24, 1865, Brother Tolton wrote to the effect that the inhabitants of the community were enjoying good health. In Sept. more than a sufficiency had been harvested to supply them until the next harvest. "Though, surrounded by Indians they have so far had no difficulty with them."

It was during the winter of 1864 & 65 that the Black Hawk war broke out. If while the Indians made hostile demonstrations in Sanpete and Sevier counties early in the year, they did not molest the people of Circleville until later; but as a precaution the settlers decide to stand guard night and day. No positive raid was made upon the settlement until November twenty sixth 1865, when a band of raiders entered the Valley from East Fork Canyon killing four persons and driving off most of the stock belonging to them.

Mrs. Mrs. Nielson of Spring City wrote the following graphic account of this raid and of what befell her and her husband: "On the morning of the 26th of November 1865 my husband, Mads Nielsen and I left Marysvale for Circleville, our home, returning from a visit to Salt Lake City. When within ten miles of home we passed another team driven by my brother-in-law, James Monsen. Being so near home we thought there would be no danger of Indians. When we reached a point about three miles from town and was driving around a hill, we saw a herd of cattle being driven toward the mouth of the canyon. I became very much frightened, believing it was Indians and I begged my husband to turn back. But as he thought the Indians had already seen us, he suggested that by driving fast we might reach a company of men who were in pursuit of the Indians. In a few minutes the Indians left the stock and with a yell started towards us. Our horses were very tired, but we urged them on, thinking we might reach a swamp about three-fourths of a mile ahead, but in this we did not succeed. The Indians rode up to us and one of them was in the act of shooting my husband who however, frightened him away some distance by pointing an old revolver at him. I suppose I am now safe in telling that the revolver was an old broken one, but of course, we did not tell the Indian so. Mr. Redskin now turned and shot our best horse, which of course stopped the team.

At the request of my husband, I with my two year old brother in my arms, jumped from the wagon, while the Indian was reloading his gun. Willows were growing along the road, but as they were low they did not afford much protection. The Indian again mounted his horse and rode around trying to get a chance to shoot my husband. At this juncture I jumped into a slough that was near, in which the water reached up to my neck, but I preferred drowning to being captured by the Indians. My husband again pointed the revolver at the Indian who again turned back. My husband then took my little brother that I was holding up out of the water and I climbed out of the slough. We walked a short distance and tried to cross the swamp at another point, but were headed off by ten Indians. Hence we got into the water again. The little boy began to cry because the water was so cold and I sat down behind a bunch of willows taking the child in my lap, and my husband stood over us to give what protection he could. The Indians did not follow us into the willows, but turned their attention to the wagon and its belongings. They cut the harness from he wounded horse, leaving the collar, and took the wagon cover off. They emptied the flour on the ground cut the feather bed tick and scattered all the feathers, threw all the dishes out of the wagons breaking all but one plate which, I still have. They also took all of our clothing. While they were destroying the contents of the wagon, and old man named Froid, who had traveled in our company, arrived at the top of the hill and saw the Indians. He might have escaped all right if he had gone back himself at once, but he ran around his steers to drive them balk. The Indians saw him, and followed him into the hills about a mile and killed him.

Just before my sister and her husband reached the ridge they were met by two men who had been sent out to guard the cattle. These men said that while they were sitting in a bunch of willows eating their dinner the Indians came out of the canyon and held council close to them. There were about twelve warriors in the attacking party. At the foot bridge spanning the Sevier river immediately east of the settlement the Indians overtook two boys who were driving cows on to the range at about nine o'clock in the morning. They shot one of the boys, Ole Heilerson. The other boy James Tilman Sanford escaped unhurt. Orson Barney, about twelve years old was out hunting stock some two miles northeast of the settlement; the Indians chased him a long distance as he ran for his life, but they finally overtook and killed him. A young man, Hans Christian Hansen, who was also out with stock, was killed a mile north of town, on the West Side of the river.

It is said that a man approaching the settlement from across the valley was attacked by the Indians but he kept them at bay with a stick which, the Indians mistook for a gun.

When all this happened, most of the able bodied men were out of town. They had gone to mills in Sanpete and Beaver Counties. Piute Indians camped between the town and the river had built signal fires on the top of the east mountain to let Black Hawk's warriors know of an opportune time to attack the settlement. The Indians took nearly all the horned stock the people owned.

The following morning the bodies of the dead were found, one having been brought in the night before. The sad ceremony of burying the dead left the settlers in fear and mourning. A strong guard was posted about the town.”

Under the of date of April 15, 1866, Edward Tolton again wrote from Circleville to the Deseret News:

"The citizens of this place are united in their operation to render themselves as safe as possible from Indian Marauders; and are happy and comfortable by their united labor in making improvements around their homes. Brothers Ivy Peterson and Peter C. Hanson have been engaged for some time in erecting a wind mill for grinding grain, and allow me to state that we have a good supply of wind in the region. In fact, very frequently a little more than we can face, hence the reason for using a portion of it for our benefit.

The people are and have been united in their efforts in bestowing on their children the advantages of schools. At present there are about eight children divided into two schools, one taught by Mr. Collins and the other by Mrs. Collins. Both teachers and students-seem mutually interested and spirited. Could be but have additional members in our isolated region; and could we be favored by the advantage of regular mail facilities, we could strive to appreciate those blessings, by proving ourselves worthy."

The Piute Indians still remained in the valley professing friendship, although mistrusted by the settlers. Some of their behavior was so suggestive to the whites felt themselves in danger, not knowing when an attack might recur. On Monday April 21, 1866, an express reached Circleville with the news that two of the pretended friendly Piute had shot and killed a white man who belonged to a party of militia, stationed some distance up the Sevier River at Fort Sanford. The fort that had been built that spring by the militia under Silas Sanford Smith and his men were about half way between Circleville and Panguitch. Word was immediately sent to the people of Circleville to protect themselves against the Indians who were camped in the valley. On receiving this word, the men of the settlement were called together for consultation, and after considerable deliberation it was concluded that the best policy would be to place the Indiana encamped near by, under arrest. Consequently all able-bodied men were mustered into service, some on horseback and some on foot.

Thus organized they proceeded to the Indian camp which they surrounded after dark. They had no trouble or occasion, however, to use force as James T. and Jackson Allred went into the camp and persuaded the Indians to come to the meeting house to hear a letter read which had just been received. All the Indians complied willingly but one warrior, who not only refused to go, but began shooting at the posse. They returned the fire and killed him. The rest of the Indians were taken to the meeting house that night, the letter was read to them. They were then told they would be retained as prisoners awaiting further particulars of the killing at Fort Sanford. The Indians showed resistance, but their bows, arrows and knives were taken from them and thus secured, the men took turns guarding, through the night.

Toward evening of the next day (April 22) while the Indians were still under guard, some got loose and began an attack upon the guard, knocking two of them down. There was every reason to fear and general break on the part of the Indians and it was decided that the settlement would be in great danger if the Indians were allowed to escape. In the general melee and excitement if the Indians were allowed to escape. In the general melee and excitement which, followed, the Indians were killed, with the exception of a number of children, who were taken care of by the settlers.

After this sad affair, there were no more attacks on the part of the savages; but companies of militia from other parts of the territory came to assist the settlers in defending themselves, and a strong guard was kept around the town. As a precaution against attack from Indians, the houses had been built around the meeting house in fort style. The location according to Peter Gottfredson was a short distance south of Bishop Peterson's home, now the present Mortenson home.

The settlers from Marysvale moved into Circleville that summer, but as danger of attack became greater, instruction were given by the Authorities of the Church that men in charge of the Militia escort the people of Circleville and other settlement on the Upper Sevier, to older and stronger settlements for safety. There were about forty families living in Circleville at the time.

The evacuation of the settlement took place June 20, 1866. Most of the people going North to Sanpete County. A few crossed the mountains to Beaver and Fillmore, leaving their fields of promising grain un-harvested. Some seven hundred acres of land was under cultivation at the time. The field thus left with growing wheat and vegetables were afterward harvested by men from Beaver, who were serving under Captain Joseph Nathanial Betenson of Fort Sanford. Fort Sanford was manned in turn by contingents from Circleville, Parowan, Beaver and Panguitch. The Beaver men were serving their term at the time. Circleville and Marysvale were the only two settlements in Piute County during this period.

The valley remained vacant until sometime after 1869, when the Bullion Mining boom declined and some miners began taking up claims on the river and streams near by. Three such man whom came into Circle Valley were James Kittleman, Bansom Mitchell and Josephus Wade. They came probably as early as 1873. James Kittleman's log house still stands north of the highway near the mouth of the canyon. It is presently owned by Dell Reynolds. Ransom Mitchell's house was in the pasture land, west of the White River bridge, south of the Clay Hill Service and Josephus Wade's log cabin was located at the mouth of Wade's Canyon west of Circleville.” The first Mormon settler to return to the valley was Charles Wakeman Dalton, (and his first wife, Julietta Bowman) who came in 1874. He was followed by his sons, Charles Albert and Orson Dalton and their families, and later by Elizabeth Dalton, his second plural wife, with her family. The Elias Pearson family of Glenwood, was probably the next to settle in the valley.

When Charles A. Dalton arrived with his family in 1875 or 1876 he found only four families living at or near Circleville. Others came that fall. Ranchers had been living along the river at the near junction of the rivers as early as 1873. The new settlers found the old mill standing by the river about a quarter of a mile south of the old fort, which stood some where in the vicinity of the present grade school. These early settlers took possession of the original dams and ditches constructed by the first settlers.

According to the statement of Elder Thomas Day, there was no church organization in Circleville when he came in 1877. But in the summer of 1878 the first meeting was held in the house of Charles A. Dalton, on the site of the Charles A. Dalton home, east of Alma Morgan's present home. At that time William King and some others from the order settlement visited the west settlement and blessed two children. Any records of that early time were burned accidentally hence only meager information of the period can be obtained.

A number of Mormons moved into the valley in 1877-78 and Thomas Day was appointed the first Ward Teacher on the west side of the river, laboring under the direction of Bishop William King, at what is now referred to as Old Kingston, or the Order, East of the river. He was the only teacher on the West side of the river. The people were so scattered that when he visited them he traveled by team from house to house.

The first school taught west of the river was by Miss Henrietta Pearson in a small log house down the Pearson lane in the vicinity of the Ross Thomas' farm. Martin Dalton, Ed Fullmer and Charles R. Dalton were some of her students.

The following excerpt was taken from the files of Church Historian, Andrew Jensen:

"In the fall of 1876, Thomas A. King, of Fillmore, moved his family and some others, into Circle Valley, with a view of establishing a United Order. They settled on the East Side of the Sevier River, about two miles east from the original dugouts of the 1864 settlement.

In 1877, William King was chosen Bishop of the settlement. Within two years the United Order was established and again William King was elected President. This order lasted about six years. During this time they built a grist mill, woolen factory, and a tannery,, in the mouth of East Fork Canyon also a saw mill on City Creek and a central dining hall seventy feet long in the middle of town. The people ate together for two years or more. Houses were built around this dining hall in fort like style, which gave them a central place for community purposes. "Prosperity was enjoyed in the form of herds of sheep, cattle, horses and abundant crops; at one time there were about one thousand head of horned stock. Most of West Side Circleville settlers were outsiders or half-hearted Mormons, and their first inspiration toward establishing a church organization and living their religion dame from the Kingston group."

Dissatisfaction arose within the order, causing the withdrawal of members and finally the breaking up of the organization. The King family inherited the mills and factories and moved farther east to the present town site of Kingston to operate them, taking their name with them.

In addition to the forgoing excerpt from Andrew Jensen, we might add that three families from Circleville were original members. They were the Thomas C. Smith, James Knight and Steven Mansor families. Thomas W. Smith was the first male child born in the order.

Besides the prosperity referred to, there were some reverses. Their sheep and cattle were preyed upon by the Marshall’s, a band of outlaws from up the river. One year a severe hail storm and a resulting flood washed away their grain standing in stock; and many people who had put their all into it, came out with practically nothing.

Returning to the West Side of the river, from 1876 on, more families entered the valley to file on homesteads. In that year a mail route from Monroe to Circleville was established. A Mr. Farer and Charles A. Dalton were early mail carriers. Mrs. Daniel Gills and James Wiley were early Postmasters.

In May 1881, Thomas Day organized the first Sunday school in a small log house belonging to Annie Thompson. Soon afterward, Sacrament Meetings were begun.

At a Stake Conference held at Panguitch June 1882, Thomas Day was set apart as Presiding Elder for the West side of the river, under the direction of Bishop William King of the Order; who had been given charge of ecclesiastical affairs in the valley. Thomas Day had been available for the position.

The first Sunday school Jubilee was held at Circleville, Sept. 4, 1883. Daniel Gillis was Superintendent of the Sunday school and Mrs. Susan Gillis was Relief Society President.

In March of 1884 Elder Thomas Day moved to Gunnison and Elder Laban Marrill Sr. was appointed to succeed him.

Charles A. Dalton donated two acres of land for a school and meeting house at the present site of the Glen Betenson home. This house was built by having each family furnish three hewn logs on the ground and help in the labor of building. Thus a low log house was provided for all community purposes. About this time, Laban Morrill Sr. was arrested on charge of unlawful cohabitation. After a trial in the Second District Court at Beaver, March 14, 1885, he was acquitted.

In the fall of 1886, Thomas Day returned to Circleville and immediately began agitating for a Ward organization. In the spring of 1885 James Ephraim Peterson had been called from his home in Grass Valley, on a mission to the North Western States, which must have included, at that time, most of the territory West of the Mississippi River. Owing to Thomas Day's insistence upon a ward organization, it was determined to recall James E. Peterson from his mission to accept the appointment as Bishop of the Circleville Ward. Since the Mission Territory was so large, and mail service slow, they were a long time finding him. He was finally located at Omaha Nebraska. He returned home and at a meeting held at the School House, 1887, by Apostle, Heber J. Grant and Stake President, Jesse Crosby, he was ordained the first Bishop of Circleville; with Laban Morrill Jr. and Daniel Gillis as counselors. Thomas Day was set apart as presiding Teacher, with eight assistants.

Bishop Peterson having been called from Grass Valley, necessitated his moving to Circleville to make his home; so he and his brother marked the logs of his house in Grass Valley, took them down and the men from Circleville went with teams and wagons to help with the moving of the house, and the rebuilding of it on the present site of the Larry Gass home. The front rooms of that home are those some log rooms originally built, there for Bishop Peterson. The location of the home at that time was because of its proximity to the School and Church building across the street. At a later date he purchased a farm and built a home farther south, the home is now owned by Mrs. Minnie Mortenson. Bishop Peterson held the position from 1887 until 1896, when he resigned because of ill health. The ward was reorganized with Jorgan P. Jensen as Bishop and Robert E. Sainsbury and Joel White as Counselors. During Bishop Benson's term, the first missionaries from the ward were called: Alfred Jensen, to the Southern States and Alvis Smith to the North Western States.

During these two Bishop's terms of office, the Sunday School was conducted under the superintendence of Ephraim Caffel, for a time, succeeded by Joseph Simkins, who served in that position for from ten to fifteen years. About 1904 or 1905, Bishop Jensen resigned and J.E. Peterson was again chosen for the position which, he held until 1915; at which time he moved to Idaho. He was succeeded by Benjamin Cameron Jr., followed by James 0. Meeks and then by Henry Sudweeks, all for short terms. In 1927 James L. Whittaker was chosen Bishop and he served for eighteen years. When he resigned in 1945, he was followed by Elwood Dalton, C.B. Crane and Arthur Gottfredson, to be followed by Stanley E. Dalton, and Keith Dalton, our present Bishop.

Through the years, many changes have taken place. The early homes were all of logs, or logs and lumber "lean-tos". In 1887 the low log schoolhouse with the dirt roof was raised and a shingle roof put on. A few years later another room was added, but it still served for church school and recreation.

Sometime in the middle nineties, four large homes were built. The frame home and family hotel of John H. Fullmer, the brick homes of Orson Dalton and Laban Morril.

A few years before the turn of the century, Orson Dalton built a dance hall with a stage in one end. This was the largest building in the county and often served for celebrations for the surrounding towns, as far away as Marysvale and the people from the ranches up the river. One such occasion occurred when Murry King of Kingston and Vone DeWitt of Marysvale volunteered for service in the Spanish American War. A county wide celebration was held. Schools were dismissed to see the parade. The brass band played, the volunteers headed the procession. The flag was flown, the other patriotic banners were carried and most of the men of the county joined the procession. The hall was decorated in the national colors, a banner in-scribed, "Our Heroes" written in large capitol letters, etched across the front of the stage. A program of patriotic songs and speeches followed. It was quite an impressive demonstration.

Because people lived on their farms, the town was very much scattered.

The first store was at the Whittaker Ranch, three miles east of the schoolhouse on the Glen Betenson lot. At some early period, John H. Fullmer began what was for years the largest mercantile establishment in the south end of the county; drawing trade from much of the surrounding territory. It was situated across the street south from his home. For most of the early years this location was the center of town.

The people in general were poor, with few of the comforts of life. As Mrs. Daphne Smith

(Hannah Daphne Smith Dalton) points out, there was in the earlier time and dire poverty, She tells of her father-in-law, Thomas C. Smith walking over the Beaver Mountain, bringing back a sack of flour on his back for his family, who were without bread. She also points out that because of the winds that prevailed, this was formidable valley to subdue, and fraught with discouragement. Often in the spring, the winds became so rampant that sandstorms blew the seeds out of the ground, and that in certain localities it had been necessary to replant two and three times. This was especially true in the South East part of the valley, where Henry Fox (Rod Dalton’s great-grandfather) lived. It was not unusual to see cyclones spiraling across that flat. Only after tree shrubs and vegetation were planted was the ground established. Brush was grubbed by hand, piled and burned. The plow and perhaps a home made harrow, with wooden teeth, and homemade cultivators were their only horse drawn implements. The harvesting was done with scythe and cradle, and threshing was done with flails.

As time went on, conditions improved. Mr. James Whittaker brought the first horse power threshing machine into the valley. It was called the "Star Rooster". It had a capacity of about one hundred bushels of grain a day. Threshing in the fall was never begun until after the wood hauling was over. This was an exciting time for the youngsters who ran for the threshing machine as soon as school was out. Even the little girls stood off to watch the horses on the sweep go round and round.

Then came the house-cleaning when the home made rag carpets were taken up, cleaned and given a padding of new straw and the straw bed sticks were refilled for the coming year.

For the twenty fourth of July following Statehood (1896) a special celebration was held and part of the parade depicted progress. On a hay rack stood men with the old hand implements and behind them came a horse drawn moving machine, a rake and a self- binder; brand new and the first in the valley. There were probably harvesting machines before, but not self-binders.

Our one public building and the private hall built by Orson Dalton in the early nineties were now inadequate for our growing community.

In the spring of the year 1894, a move was put under way to build a Church house. That summer, pink granite stone was quarried up Kingston Canyon and hauled to Circleville by teams. Each man donating his time and labor. The rocks were piled on the southeast lot of the Church block reserved for the Ward House. On the Southwest lot was the granary with the root cellar beneath it and the stack yard a little Northeast of it; for people paid they’re tithing in kind. For some reason these stones were never used in a church building. Perhaps the construction would have been more expensive than the people could or would support.

Before the turn of the century the school population had exceeded the capacity of the two- room schoolhouse. In 1898 a small frame schoolhouse was built on the now Harold Fullmer lot, to accommodate the first grade. Miss Blanche Parker was the first teacher there.

Because roads were poor and the river crossings not always safe, the east side of the river had a one-room school from a very early time. William Allen taught there for two or three years, in his early residence in the Valley. He came in 1888.

Later an adjacent ward was organized with a Presiding Elder and Sunday school, Mutual and Sacrament Meetings were held. Edward Davis recalls that James Munson was the Presiding Elder of the Branch and that Alexander Davis was Sunday School Superintendent, with Melvin Webb as, assistant. At first the Ephraim Day home was used as a meeting place for both Church and School, the then blue, frame, one room building was erected and for a number of years served for school, church, and recreation. Just after the turn of the century, the school district bought the pink granite stones from the Church and built the two-story rock building completed in 1902. At first there were four classrooms and the front part of the second story was used as an auditorium. The old log schoolhouse was abandoned the first grade house and the one room school from over the river were closed and all children in the valley attended school in the new building. It served also for church and recreation. Later, two classrooms and an office were made from the auditorium.

About 1905 by private enterprise, a large social hall was built on the now vacant lot North of Harold Gottredson's home. This building burned November 7, 1918 the day after the election. It had served the community well and many older people recall with a nostalgia the dances held there and the orchestras that played in it: Jimmy Nielson, the Barney boys and more recently the home orchestra trained by Frank Wilcox, followed by the Simkins Brothers and Company.

The one room school on the Harold Fullmer lot had been purchased by the Relief Society and used by them for a number of years.

The People now felt the need of a new Church house and with the money from the sale of the rocks to the School District, and donations of money, labor, and help from the Church, a new frame church building- was erected where the Forest buildings now stand. This was accomplished during Bishop Peterson's second term in office. After the Amusement Hall burned, this church was our only place for recreation until the brick high school was built in 1921. This building contained two classrooms, an auditorium with a stage, and rest rooms with showers; for by this time the town had incorporated and installed our city water system. But as the high school grew, and more classrooms were needed, the school district, the town and the church combined to build the present gymnasium. This was completed in 1928.

During the depression in the thirties, the present grade school was as constructed as a make work project. The old rock building had no inside plumbing, except a washbasin and the rooms were heated by wood stoves. It was also condemned as a fire hazard, so it was torn down and the rock used for the present grade school building. By this time the furnace in the frame church was gone and its plan was in-adequate for the needs of the ward, so by subscription and church help again, our present church was built. This was during James L. Whittaker's term of office as Bishop. It was completed in 1940.

An extension was added to the High School building in 1945. A City Building was erected in 1949 during Glen Betenson's term as Mayor. Besides two rooms for civic purposes, it contains a jail and a fire station.

Until the turn of the century, most homes were heated by the open fireplace. Heating stoves were a later innovation. Mrs. Celestial Knight read all of Dicken's books, by the light of her open fire. Chopping kindling and carrying night's wood was regular tasks of the children.

Our lighting system has progressed through open fire, tallow candle, and coal oil lamp to carbide systems and gasoline tanks until finally in 1931 electricity came to the County. Today we are so dependent on it, that if it fails, few homes have light, heat, or cooking facilities.

One of our greatest improvements was that of our city water system over the surface wells and now very few homes are without plumbing.

From the horse drawn vehicles through the muddy lanes, that some times required the drivers to get out and push the mud from between the spokes of the wheels, to our graveled and oiled roads, is another revolution. No one works pole tax today. I wonder if this generation would understand the term. In 1901 the students of Charles Stoney's school were told that the first automobile would come through our town that day and that we would be excused to go see it. I'm sure we all remember the excitement that prevailed when of we heard the first "chug" The boys bolted the room like a shot and the rest of us followed fast.

Some Eastern Business men with mining interests in the Cocnena mountains of Arizona had the automobile shipped to Marysvale by rail, had gas and oil placed at the various towns along the way intending to drive it to the mountains. They drove it from Marysvale to Circleville, parked it in Fullmer's shed and hired Willard Simkins to take them by white topped buggy to their destination and back. Willard also trailed the car back to Marysvale for shipment East. Horsepower has been replaced by steam, gasoline and diesel. A team of horses has for a long time been a novelty in our locality. No longer do freighters drive four horse teams on ten-day or two weeks trips to Kanab through freezing snow or blistering sun and wind, or rain.

From time to time our people have cooperated to improve economic conditions. The various irrigation companies have maintained canals and improved their systems. We participated in the building of the Hatch Reservoir, which proved a catastrophe.

Mrs. Daphne Smith gives us a graphic description of the flood as follows:

"The reservoir was constructed not far from Hatch. This water was used to supplement the supply of water for the farm along the Sevier River. In May 1914 a telephone message came to Circleville, that the dam had gone out and all the water was coming. The people of our community gathered up their livestock and moved them to safety. The families went to higher ground and waited. As it entered the valley it spread out. Trees, huge boulders, entire wire fences, dead animals and other debris and a layer of silt covered the farms adjacent to the river channel. Beside the storage loss, it took some years to bring the farms back to full production."

Our potato corporation has been for a time, of high economic benefit. As a cash crop it was source for bringing hundreds of thousands of dollars to the community.

Farming has been our main industry. Livestock raising has supplemented it and open range offered an opportunity for some extensive grazing, even over-grazing, until Government regulation was made effective. Early dairying was done in the home with a crank churn; and happy was the housewife if she had a few extra pounds of butter to sell at 20 cents per pound, for this along with the eggs from the farm flock, furnished many homes much of grocery and household supplies. Do you remember when you were given a few "eggs for candy" The "one egg kinds" were the bane of the clerk's lives. Egg prices ranged from 20 cents per dozen to nothing when the merchants were unable to handle them. Today the chicken business is a specialized industry and few farm flocks remain. The first attempt at commercializing milk, was the establishment of a skinning station in the house where Lula Betenson now lives. The milk was gathered in cans, weighed, tested, separated and then returned in the cans. Later, individual hand separators were installed. The cream was gathered and hauled to Marysvale for shipment to Salt Lake City.

Another venture was the building of a cheese factory on a hill by the Clay Hill Service Station. This failed for lack of sufficient market. Dairying is now a specialized industry under State control.

Our fruit production has been limited. The small fruits and hardier tree fruits have been grown by quite a few people. Alfred and James Ruby, J.E. Peterson and James Whittaker had quite sized orchards, before and just after the turn of the century. However, most of our fruit came from Dixie. As late summer approached we watched eagerly for the covered wagon of the "Dixie Peddler". Those were the days of barter and his fruit was often purchased with grain, potatoes, or cured meat; for there was very little money in the average household. Later in the fall the produce would be dried fruit and molasses. The molasses would sometimes be carried in wooden barrel on the side of his wagon and people took their own containers to be filled from the spigot. Quite often, especially near election time, the barrel contained "Dixie Wine". This enhanced the political arguments even to the point of fistfights at times.

The drabness of our log homes was relieved by hardy shrubs and summer flowers. Lawns were not common in early times for few people afforded lawn mowers and cutting by scythe and sickle was laborious and time consuming. In later years, as homes improved, so did surroundings and today a number of beautiful landscapes are in evidence. Our recent beautification program has given further impetus to town improvement.

People everywhere and under all circumstances seek some recreation. The first schoolhouse in the Pearson lane served also for dancing and parties. One of my earliest recollections was a picnic in the north room of the log schoolhouse followed by square dancing. The "wood dances" held in the Martin Dalton hall were an annual occasion. Tickets were paid for by loads of wood taken to the Church and to widows. Hot suppers were served. Step dancing, quartet singing, and stump speeches were part of the entertainment. Young and old participated. Babies in buggies or in beds on benches were a part of the group. Quilting, rag bees and candy pullings (usually molasses) were other features of the social life. Other entertainment local and itinerant, added to, or detracted from our cultural life.

Richard Horn, teacher and music teacher, was probably our first accomplished musician. After the turn of the century, Fred E'jeldstead taught music. He organized a band and also staged several operas. G.M. Beebe was, for years, choir leader and organist. Most of the dance music in Mart Dalton Hall was furnished by George Beebe at the organ, Ezra Bird Sr, on the Piccolo, and Will and Tom Thomas on the violin and guitar. Later Jimmie Nielson and the Barney Boys furnished some dance music. Professor Frank Wilcox taught instrumental music, organized a band and orchestra from which much talent as the Simkins orchestra and Judd Haycock' s violin playing resulted. Various High School teachers have continued and improved our musical appreciation.

In the Martin Dalton hall, the Walter Christensen players of Richfield brought such fine old plays as East Lyn and Hasel Kirk. The Ralph Cloniger players presented Piere of the Plains and Peg 0 My Heart and some other fine plays, in the new hall. From about the 1915 to 1920 we supported a series of chatauqua performances of music, lectures, plays and monologues. Some time in the 1920's Louise and Ozro Fullmer brought us our first regular picture shows. This business has been continued by Earl Whittaker and many of the fine reductions have been presented.

Home dramatics from town, church, and school have from time to time furnished excellent entertainment and developed talent. Thanks to Glen Betenson, with his Gay Nineties productions of recent years, this continues. Aesthetic dancing was introduced into our high school by Louise Whittaker and carried on by such other teachers as Mrs. Daphne Robinson and presently by Sondra Horton.

Our schools have greatly improved over the years. The first eighth grade graduating class in 1896, under R.J. Thurber, included many names as: Rhoda Gillis, Elle Lambsont, Blanche Parker, Mollie Smith, Bert Sainsbury and perhaps some others not recalled. These students were in their late teens, for school terms then were from five to seven months. They were about the same age as our first high school graduating class in 1926. Today our students attend an accredited County High School.

 

A Circleville living Legend, Carrie Allen:

There would be a void in any Circleville history if Miss Carrie Allen were not remembered. Some people become institutions, because they have had such an impact on so many people. Carrie was a schoolteacher, a sort of "Little House on the Prairie" vintage. She touched the lives of many, and because of her dedication to learning, she was able to help young students master the fundamentals of education. In 1964, when Circleville celebrated its 100th Centennial, Carrie Allen was recognized at a special awards ceremony for her positive influence on the community, and for compiling the history of Circleville. She was presented with a dozen red roses as a token 'thank you' from her former students. As she accepted the flowers, the master of ceremonies asked all who had had Miss Allen as a teacher to please stand. Most of the audience stood, then everyone gave her a standing ovation; a fitting tribute to a special person.

Carrie was born October 8, 1888 in a log cabin in Circleville. She graduated from Snow College in Ephraim and attended the University of Utah. She started teaching school soon afterward. Her first teaching assignment was a one-room schoolhouse In Gandy, Utah. (Located in the barren Sevier desert in western-most Millard County.) Her second teaching locale was LaSal, Utah. (Located in San Juan County.) Later she returned to Circleville and spent the rest of her professional life teaching in her hometown. As the schools evolved, she taught in each building. The fifth and sixth were her assigned grades, and whether or not the students enjoyed Carrie, or liked her occasional ruler smacks on the knuckles, the students learned.

Carrie was a hard teacher in terms of expectations and requirements and she was a strict disciplinarian. She would not tolerate insubordination or lightheartedness. She not only used the yardstick effectively, but she had a deadly aim with chalk-erasers.

These were attention getters and more than one student testified that their deportment improved after being so disciplined. Probably parents today would accuse such methods as 'cruel and unusual' punishment.

Even though Carrie was strict and rigid, she also was extremely kind-hearted and aware of children with special needs. She gave many hours of unpaid tutoring help to various people In Circleville who needed help to succeed in school.

Possibly one of the most shattering experiences she bad as a teacher was taking a class down to Marysvale to the Alunlte Mine on a field trip. Some of the boys slipped away from her and got into a shed where blasting caps were stored, and an accident ensued that blinded one of the boys in one eye. Carrie always felt sad about the accident, and even talked about it in her later life.

The only art class most students had in the early Circleville schools was in Miss Allen's room. Students remember her holding a hand over the Mona Lisa's eyes to show a smile, then over the smile to show the sad eyes. The Mona Lisa became the one art piece they could later recognize and relate to.

Carrie's years after retirement from teaching 39 years were somewhat sad. She had lost the focus of her life, and after that, although she traveled some, she mostly just existed. Her mind took her back to childhood, where she lived for about eight years before her death. Her brother, Lee, and her sister, Jessie, took excellent care of her during this time, caring totally for her needs. She died peacefully on January 2, 1983, in the home where she bad lived for most of her 94 years.

Carrie never married even though she had a serious boy friend while she was in college. The Allen family was at a loss to know why she didn't marry at this time. But even though she didn't have children of her own, she served as a second mother to many of her nieces and nephews. Then, too, there were hundreds of former students who respectfully remembered her as "our special teachers"

End.

CIRCLEVILLE is situated on the West Side of the Sevier River. In December of 1863, a few men from San Pete County visited the area with the view of making a settlement, as President Brigham Young had recommended the valley as a suitable place for colonization. In the spring of 1864 a group of fifty families coming from Ephraim, Mount Pleasant and other towns rounded Circleville. Considerable pioneer labor followed and soon it became a prosperous community. Land was cultivated, ditches dug, houses erected and progress was made until the outbreak of the Black Hawk War in 1865, when several of the settlers were killed by Indians and the people were forced to vacate their homes June 20, 1866. Most of them went north to the stronger settlements, leaving beautiful fields of un-harvested grain. William J. Allred was the first presiding elder.

In December 1849, the General Assembly of the provisional State of Deseret commissioned a company already organized under the leadership of Parley P. Pratt, to explore the south and ascertain its possibilities for sustaining settlements. The expedition of nearly fifty men had left on November 25. They pushed south during the cold weather via the new settlement of Manti. Following the Sevier River to Circleville Canyon, they turned up a defile to the southwest and followed it about twelve miles north of the Spanish Trail over the mountains into the Little Salt Lake Valley, December 21. Two days later they camped on Red Creek (now Paragonah) where they paused to recuperate among the excellent meadows, willows and bunch grass abounding they’re at that time. The mountains to the northwest were already filled with livestock.

The threat from the Ute Indians in upper Sevier Valley also became acute. Menacing behavior of the Indians in this area and in the Kanab region led to an order from Utah headquarters to General Erastus Snow to send a company of men from Beaver and Iron counties over to the Sevier River to build and man an outpost between Circleville and Panguitch. A Company of 76 men led by Captain Silas S. Smith served here from March 21 to November 30, 1866. They established Fort Sanford about ten miles north of Panguitch and assisted settlers at Circleville to move to safety. At Panguitch, they helped the settlers transform the town into a fort.

“Dec. 4th. Off by sunrise. Bad road through the Canyon, 7 or 8 miles long. Crossed the Sevier a number of times; crossings bad and river frozen. At the opposite end found a wagon in the river with 2 men trying to get it shore ward; woman on the bank mourning. Stove at the bottom of the creek and furniture and truck scattered around, bad driving the result. Helped them out of their difficulty. Stove, furniture, cart, whiskey and apples circulated and we parted, rejoicing. Emerging from the canyon into Circle Valley, passing through the deserted town of Circleville, a settlement broken up by the Indians a few years ago. The place seemed haunted with its vacant adobes, with staring doors and windows. Passing on down the valley with here and there a lonely ranch, we went into camp sometime after dark on the banks of the Sevier, where I exercised my talents and time making a plum pudding, which proved to be an entire success.

During the Spanish Trail days the Sevier above the East Fork was known as the Rio San Pascual. The trail followed it for about twenty-three miles through Circle Valley and Circleville Canyon, where there was no obstacle to passage, to Bear Valley Junction where it turned abruptly to the west. The way thence was across the northern end of the Markagunt Plateau by a natural route following up Bear Creek through Lower and Upper Bear Valley. Crossing a divide the trail then headed down Little Creek, a rough and rocky route, which passed through the up thrust Hurricane Cliffs before dramatically breaking out in the open near the town of Paragonah in Parowan Valley.

Leo, the eldest living child of Lewis T. and Emma A. Morrill Munson, was born in the year of Utah's statehood in a one-room log cabin in the mouth of Circleville Canyon approximately two miles south of Circleville, Piute County. During the eleven years they lived in this location the family Bible records the births of two brothers and two sisters.

”All through the thirties Dad was also busy with his own projects. Many people in Escalante milked a few cows, separated the cream from their extra milk, and shipped it by mail to Salt Lake. Dad reasoned that they could get more money by selling the milk and that if he could make it into cheese he would have the freight to Salt Lake and some profit between the cost of producing the cheese and its wholesale price. So he purchased a piece of land, including a spring, east of Escalante from Wallace Roundy, enclosed it with a cement head house, and built a cheese factory on the site. It opened in 1933 with Rex (Fat) Thompson of Circleville as the cheese maker. Everyone in town was intrigued with the process. Many, including me, were there when enough whey had been drained away so that the curd could be eaten. But the amount of milk available did not justify the operation. In 1934 Dad instigated a cheese operation in the isolated town of Boulder, east and north of Escalante, that his brother Levar and Levar's wife Thora took charge of. it was sold on April 1, 1935.”

Source: From a diary of a early Circleville family.

CIRCLEVILLE WARD, Garfield Stake, Piute Co., Utah, consists of the Latter-day Saints residing in what is locally known as Circle Valley, and the village of Circleville, which forms the ward center. This village is situated on the west side of the Sevier River, 1 1/2 miles from the base of the mountains on the west, seven miles southwest of Junction, the county seat, 23 miles south of Marysvale, the nearest railway station on the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad, and 18 miles by mountain road northwest of Antimony, the headquarters of the stake. The Sevier River enters Circle Valley from the southwest and takes a northeasterly course through the same, dividing the valley into two nearly equal parts. All kinds of grain and hardy fruits are raised. The locality is noted for its beautiful natural scenery. The majestic Baldy Range of mountains on the west, generally covered with snow all the year round, is in plain view from Circleville.

The settlement of Circleville dates back to 1864. A few brethren from San Pete County, Utah, entered Circle Valley with a view of making settlements there in December 1863, Pres. Brigham Young, who had passed through the valley some years previously, having recommended the place as suitable for making a settlement. Responding to a call from the Church authorities, the first families, about 50 in number, hailing from Ephraim, Mt. Pleasant and other places in San Pete Valley, founded the Circleville settlement in the spring of 1864, and Wm. J. Allred was the first presiding Elder of the infant colony. Considerable pioneer labor was done and the settlement bid fair to become a prosperous community. Land was cultivated, water ditches dug, houses erected, and fine progress made until the breaking out of the Black Hawk War in 1865, during which several of the settlers were killed by Indians, and the whole colony forced to vacate the place June 20, 1866. Most of the people went north to the stronger settlements in Sevier and Sanpete Counties.

As early as 1873, a number of non-Mormons, mostly miners, returned to the valley and laid claim to some of the land. A number of families of saints arrived in 1874, including the family of Charles Wakeman Dalton, whose descendants are still living there. By 1877 there was quite a colony of saints in Circle Valley engaged in farming and stock raising. Among them was Elder Thomas Day, who, by appointment, took the lead in meetings and Sunday school sessions. In June 1882, Thomas Day was chosen to preside over the saints residing on the West Side of Circle Valley. Brother Day was succeeded in 1884 by Laban Morrill, Jr., who acted in that capacity until 1887, when the Kingston Ward was disorganized and two new wards, named Circleville and Junction, were organized in its stead. Up to that time the saints in Circle Valley had constituted a part of the Kingston Ward. James Ephraim Peterson was chosen as Bishop of the Circleville Ward. His successors were Jörgen P. Jensen, 1896–1903; James E. Petersen, 1903–1915; Benjamin Cameron, 1915–1919; James O. Meeks, 1919–1920; Henry Sudweeks, 1920–1927, and James L. Whittaker, 1927–1930. On Dec. 31, 1930, Circleville Ward had a membership of 435 souls, including 65 children. The total population of the Circleville Precinct was 541 in 1930, including 436 in the town of Circleville.

Circleville is situated on the West Side of the Sevier River, seven miles southwest of Junction, the county seat, and twenty-three miles south of Marysvale, the nearest railway station. All kinds of grain and hardy fruits are raised, and the locality is noted for its beautiful scenery. Majestic Baldy Mountain on the west, generally covered with snow all year round, is in plain view from Circleville.

In the fall of 1876 Thomas R. King of Fillmore commenced to move his large family into Circle Valley, together with a number of his sons and their families, with a view of establishing themselves in a family United Order. Some moved over at once and the rest of the family came the following year. They rounded a settlement on the East Side of Sevier River, about two miles from the site of the original Circleville, built by the pioneers of Circle Valley in 1864. The United Order started in the spring of 1877 with Thomas R. King as president. It contained about thirty families when first organized. Farming and stock raising were carried on quite successfully for about six years. They built a gristmill, woolen factory and a tannery at the mouth of East Fork Canyon, half a mile east of the present site of Kingston. They also built a sawmill on City Creek, about six miles above the present junction, in City Creek Canyon. The place was called Kingston in honor of Thomas R. King. After the town was surveyed the houses were built in fort style around a ten-acre block. The activities of the United Order proved successful and farming was carried on somewhat extensively. Also large flocks and herds were taken care of in the Order, part of the cattle and horses being herded up the East Fork of the Sevier River and on Otter Creek. The large dining hall in which the people ate together for a couple of years or more was seventy feet long. Gradually, however, some of the people became dissatisfied and withdrew from the Order. Prior to the year 1877 there were only a few people in Circle Valley, most of these being outsiders or half-hearted Mormons. Thomas R. King died Feb. 3, 1879, at Kingston.

The Barton-LeFevre Ditch is taken out of the river on the West Side about three miles north of Panguitch and covers all the farms north and east of Spry. The Veater and Goff Ditch handles all the water for farms on the West Side of the river to the mouth of Circleville Canyon. The McEwen Canal covers the land down to and including the Wilcox farms in the north end of the valley. At first these canals were privately owned but now are incorporated companies.

Chief White Horse was one of the most daring of all the warring chiefs. He led a raid on Circleville in November 1865.

The Indians attacked the settlers at Circleville, taking twenty-five head of cattle, two mules and two horses. The men were at once in pursuit of them and followed them into the canyon but could do nothing as the Indians had secured positions and it would not be safe to attack them. We learned also that the Indians had fired upon two of our men at Pear Creek above Circleville, wounding one slightly in the neck. The other man shot one Indian and wounded another.

Two boys were killed by the Indians in November 1865, in Circle Valley. One was Orson Barney born in 1852 in Circle Valley, son of Lewis and Elizabeth Turner Barney. The family made their home first in Spanish Fork and later moved to the small settlement in Piute County. The other boy, Orson's companion, Ole Heilersen (Haelesen) lost his life at the same time. Two men, Hans Christian Hartsen, a pioneer from Denmark and an older man Mr. Flygare (Flygard) were also killed. Information concerning this battle is found in the Diary of Oluf C. Larsen.

Major Allred learned from the Indians they had imprisoned at Circleville that the Utes, Piedes, Pahvants and Navajo Indians had all joined together. They had supplied themselves with ammunition to assist Black Hawk in his bloody depredations and massacring of white settlers. It was learned afterward those wounded at Marysvale were Christian Christensen, who died about three weeks later, John P. Peterson and Jens Mortensen all of Richfield.

Lieut. Gen. Daniel H. Wells went to Sanpete County, and took command of the forces in the war area. He sent detachments to assist settlers in abandoning villages and establishing themselves in more populous towns. The weaker settlements in Summit, Wasatch, Sanpete, Sevier, Piute, Beaver, Iron, Kane and Washington counties were abandoned and removed to the stronger ones. Occasionally one of the so-called "stronger" centers was deserted. Circleville, for example, attracted the people of smaller hamlets in Piute County. Then it, too, was abandoned in late June 1866. Notwithstanding every precaution, occasionally the Indians would find some weak point in the militia line and capture a herd of stock. Thus it continued through the summer. So many men were in service in the heart of the war area that little grain was raised and few improvements were made.

One of the first acts of General Wells was to renew the pursuit of Black Hawk and the Round Valley herds. Colonel John R. Winder, with a company of cavalry, followed the trail of the raiders by forced marches through a region of cliffs and deep defiles into a desert. Suffering from thirst, the little company of horsemen pushed deep into the desolate flats. Virtually night and day for three days they pushed on. At last, weakened by thirst, with their mouths sore from the brackish water of alkali streams, and their tongues swollen until speech was difficult, they decided it would be folly to continue. The horses were almost exhausted. Climbing ridges, they could see no dust of the fugitives. Colonel Winder ordered the company to return and found difficulty in getting the men back to safety.

Gold was first discovered near Marysvale, in 1854, by a prospector named Hewitt in the waters of Pine Creek, which empties into the Sevier River not far from the present town. The news of the discovery traveled around, but due to the inaccessibility of the area nothing was done about it. In 1864, fifty families were called by the Latter-day Saints Church authorities to go into the region and settle in Circle Valley in the little town of Circleville and take up farming.

Sources:

Our Pioneer Heritage, Vol. 8, p.6.

Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter.

Andrew Jenson, Encyclopedic History of the Church.

History of Panguitch Stake.

Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter.

The Dalton Family History Book; by Donald C. Whittaker.

Before we continue with the history of the Dalton family in Circleville lets tell the story of a famous Circleville resident, Butch Cassidy.

The History and legend of the famous outlaw, Butch Cassidy:

Born Robert Leroy Parker in Beaver, Utah, on Apr. 13, 1866, Robert was the oldest of 13 children and had no formal education. Cassidy became a cowboy while still in his teens when he met Mike Cassidy, adopting Cassidy's name after he joined him in rustling cattle in Utah and Colorado.

Robert Leroy Parker’s father was Maximilian Parker from Lancaster, England. His mother was Annie Campbell (Gillies) from Scotland. They were married in 1865 in Beaver, Utah. He had a brother Dan who was as notorious as he, but Butch had the reputation.

The Parker family moved from Beaver, traveled over the mountain and settled on a small ranch west of the road about 5 miles south of Circleville Utah. “Butch Cassidy” lived there as a small boy. Later when he finally left for a life of crime, his father & mother moved into the center of Circleville. Their old house is still standing and is still being lived in to this day. This house is a large 2-story red brick building and is located in the center of town. Where did Max Parker, Robert’s father find the money to buy such a large and fancy house? We can only guess!

The old Parker home in the middle of Circleville Utah

 

Before we continue with the life of Butch Cassidy, lets read a recent article taken off the Internet .

Three miles south of the small town of Circleville, Utah near the mouth of Circleville Canyon, at the base of a small hill, there is a rustic two-room log cabin with a shingled roof. The cabin was built 134 years ago, and is beginning to show signs of neglect. The doors are missing and the windowpanes are gone. Cattle have been using the building for a barn. Behind the old cabin is a row of Lombardy poplars, their branches twisted with age. Nearby is an old abandoned wagon and several pieces of rusty farm equipment, attesting to a time when the Circle Valley ranch was productive. This was the boyhood home of Butch Cassidy,

In recent years, following the appearance of a major motion picture and a plethora of books and magazines articles, the notoriety of the amiable Utah-born outlaw has come to equal, if not surpass, that of Jesse James or Billy the Kid. During the heyday of the Wild West until nearly a decade after the turn of the last century, he rode at the head of the largest and best organized gang of bank and train robbers in the history of the American West, collectively known as the Wild Bunch. While decidedly a criminal, he never killed a man of record, and was well-liked-even admired- in his own time,

No name in all of Western history has incited as much interest and as much controversy as that of Butch Cassidy. The debate still rages among historians as to whether or not Cassidy died next to his compadre, The Sundance Kid, in the little mountain village of San Vicente, Bolivia, in 1908, or whether he lived to return to the United States in later years. Butch's sister, Lula Parker Betenson, wrote a book in 1975 in which she claimed that her brother returned home to Circleville to visit his aged father in 1925. If the story is true, then he probably visited the old two-room log cabin 'that had once been his boyhood home.

The history of the cabin, which became the Parker family home, began some fourteen years earlier with a tragedy.

During the year 1865, Indians throughout the territory went to war against the settlers under the leadership of Chief Black Hawk. On July 14, Robert Gillespie and Anthony Robinson had been killed near Salina in Sevier County. On July 18, the militia under Col. Warren S. Snow had routed the hostiles in Grass Valley, killing twelve of them. On July 26 the Indians attacked Glenwood, Sevier County, wounding one man and driving off cattle. They retreated through Circle Valley.

During the second week of August a wagon company of settlers approached Circle Valley where they hoped to take up land and found a settlement. They came up from Kanab under the leadership of Charles Van Vleet. Van Vleet had been born in Truxton, New York, on January 25, 1820, and as a young man moved with his family to Lawrence County, Illinois, where, in 1845, at the age of twenty-five, he married fourteen year-old Rachel Ann Black. They were baptized into the Mormon Church in 1864 and settled at Kanab, Kane County, Utah.

On or about August 14, 1865, somewhere at the head of Circleville Canyon (then known as Sevier River Canyon) south of Circle Valley, the wagon company encountered a lone rider carrying the mail from Panguitch, As it happened, the mail carrier was none other than Maximillian "Maxy" Parker. Gardner G. Potter, the guide and scout for the wagon company, induced Maxy Parker to show them the most feasible wagon route down the canyon, and they arrived in the valley on the evening of August 16th and made camp near the base of a small hill. The wagons were pulled into a circle and the livestock were corralled in the middle. In the Van Vleet wagon, Sixteen year-old Mary Ann Van Vleet had made her bed on some sacks of flour over her body in an effort to hide. Several Indians climbed inside the wagon and one of them began to rip the flour sacks open with his knife. Gardner Potter leaped onto the end-gate and shot the intruder, while the second Indian attacked him with a knife and the two men grappled and tumbled out onto the ground where the second Indian was dispatched. A third Indian leaped upon the wagon tongue at the front and was shot to death by Maxy Parker.

When the battle was over, the body of little Charles Van Vleet was discovered at the front of the wagon, scalped and mutilated. Mary Ann Fainted, The little boy had been the only fatality among the settlers, though several of the men had been wounded. At least six of the Indians had been killed and perhaps twice that number wounded. After the attack, Charles Van Vleet, Garnder Potter, Maxy Parker, and a few others joined the militia under Col. Warren S. Snow to pursue the renegades. After nearly a month of cat-and-mouse pursuit the Indians were encountered on September 21st camped near Fish Lake, 80 miles east of Circle Valley. During the ensuing battle, seven Indians were killed and Snow and two of his men were wounded. The Indians were completely routed and the settlers returned to Circle Valley to establish their homes.

Charles Van Vleet and John James decided to form a partnership and establish a ranch together on the site where Van Vleet's little son had been killed. One report stated that the cabin they built was directly over the boy's grave, to prevent desecration of the grave by the renegades. Other accounts state that the boy was buried "nearby."

The two-room log cabin was constructed by Charles Van Vleet and John James, assisted by Gardner Potter (who married Mary Ann Van Vleet the following year) in the as fall of 1865, just before the onset of winter, The Van Vleet's crowded into one room, and the James family in the other. On May 1, 1866, in the midst of further Indian depredations, Rachel Van Vleet gave birth to a daughter in the cabin, whom they named Ida Mary, their first child to be born in Utah. One child had died and another had been born on the site of the cabin destined to become the home of Butch Cassidy.

Maximillian Parker settled on North Creek, a few miles from Beaver, where he had started a ranch shortly after marrying Ann Gillies on her nineteenth birthday, July 12, 1865. Here at the North Creek ranch, on April 13, 1866, their first child was born, whom they named Robert Leroy Parker-the future Butch Cassidy.

Continuing Indian depredations drove the Van Vleets out of Circle Valley after about a year, and they took up a ranch next to Maxy Parker on North Creek near Beaver. John James remained on the Circle Valley ranch somewhat longer, but eventually he too evacuated the cabin and returned to Kanab.

By 1879, Maximillian Parker was disenchanted with life at Beaver and became determined to settle in Circle Valley. Charles Van Vleet, believing himself to be the sole owner of the ranch there after John James abandoned it, made an offer that Maxy Parker Gould not refuse: he offered to trade his ranch in Circle Valley for Parker's ranch on North Creek. The deal was completed and Maxy Parker moved his growing family into the two-room log cabin near Circleville in time to plant an early crop of wheat, But hot dry winds blew over the Hurricane Cliffs and devastated the crop. The winter of 1879-80 was particularly severe, and a second crop was late in being planted and nearly failed, Maxy Parker and his eldest son were both forced to take jobs away from home to supplement their income.

Thirteen year-old Robert Leroy Parker went to work for rancher Pat Ryan near Milford, It was here he had his first brush with the law. On a particular Sunday, young Parker rode into Milford to purchase a new pair of jeans. It had not occurred to him that the local mercantile would be closed. He jimmied the door, entered the store, and selected a pair of jeans. He had no money on him, hoping to have the jeans put on account until payday, so he left an IOU. As far as he was concerned, the matter was totally above reproach.

The disgruntled storekeeper saw it differently. He noticed the sheriff who rode out to the Ryan ranch and placed the boy under arrest for theft. It proved to be a major embarrassment to Butch, his employer, and his family. After working two-years for Ryan, Butch quit the job and returned home to Circle Valley.

For a time, Butch stayed at home and helped his mother run the ranch in his father's absence. It was at this time that he helped his mother plant the row of Lombardy poplars behind the log house for a windbreak and landscaping.

Ann Parker tried to raise her children in the influence of the Church, without much success. Her husband was a "jack-Mormon," a term employed for inactive members, and the older boys-Robert, Daniel and Arthur-all followed in their father's example, Ann did insist on holding family meetings in the home with strong emphasis on religion and education. The meetings were opened with prayer, followed by reading from the Bible and Book of Mormon, with passages from literature and history, with Dickens being a favorite, and young Butch would often entertain with his harmonica.

Maxy Parker's disaffection from the Mormon Church stemmed from an incident related to the Circle Valley ranch. When Maxy returned home from his work in the mines, he had a few dollars saved for improvements to the ranch. He filed for homestead on an adjoining 160 acres of land, originally part of the claim established by Charles Van Vleet and his partner John James. James had vacated the land during the Indian troubles, and Maxy saw in it an opportunity to double the size of his ranch.

Present day view of Butch Cassidy’s boyhood cabin in Circleville Utah.

No sooner had Maxy Parker filed on the land, and after investing his savings in improvements and a crop, John James suddenly reappeared and laid claim to the land. When Maxy defended his right to homestead the abandoned property. James presented the matter to the local Mormon bishop for arbitration.

It was customary in Utah at that time to have most civil and even some criminal matters resolved by a 'bishop's court." In the instance of James vs Parker, the bishop ruled in favor of James, an active tithe paying Church member, against Parker, a avowed inactive covenant breaker. Maxy lost his land, his savings, and his last iota of respect for the Church. His eldest son shared his father's disdain and never forgave the Church officials for throwing the family into abject poverty.

In June 1884, Eighteen year-old Robert Leroy Parker informed his mother that he was leaving home. "He had craved a freedom he could never experience at our little ranch in Circle Valley," his sister Lula wrote. When next they heard about him, he was a bank and train robber known as Butch Cassidy.

Ann Parker died just after the turn of the century. In time, Maxy Parker left the old ranch home and moved into a brick house in town where he lived out the rest of his life. The old two-room ranch lay vacant, though the family kept some of the original furnishings inside and stayed there on occasion. In 1975 someone backed a truck up to the front door of the old cabin and hauled away the furniture and mementos of the Parker family. Since that time the old cabin has fallen into decline and stands in need of restoration. Today the old cabin belongs to Mr. Afton Morgan. A coalition of interested parties has been actively engaged in establishing a group dedicated to the restoration and preservation of this priceless relic of Utah's fascinating past. After 134 years, it is the last physical link to the unique history of the enigmatic man known as Butch Cassidy, and its loss would be tragic and irreplaceable.

Sources:
Butch Cassidy. My Brother, Lula Betenson and Dora Flack, BYU Press, Provo, 1975.

Butch Cassidy, A Biography, Richard Patterson, Univ. of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, 1998.

Potter and Van Vleet family histories in possession of the author.

"Butch Cassidy's Boyhood Home: End of An Era," Kerry Ross Boren & Lisa Lee Boren,

Indian Depredations in Utah, Peter Gottfredson, 1919 (Utah Hist. Soc.)

Research and preservation efforts of Ron Warner, Orem, Utah.

Our Dalton Family of Circleville must of know and had many dealing with “Butch Cassidy” over the years. He came to town many times to visit his father & mother but the sheriff always looked the other way. His sister Lula Parker Betenson, lived in Circleville all her life and even wrote a book about her famous brother.

"My brother, Butch Cassidy, didn't die in South America as the movies would have you believe," Lula Betenson, Circleville, Piute County, told the Salt Lake Exchange Club at Hotel Utah. The spry and articulate woman, a former Utah State legislator, explained that her parents' first child, Robert LeRoy Parker, took the name Butch Cassidy after his first bank robbery in Telluride, Colorado.

"They (Butch and Matt Warner) got a good lot of money and gave the law the slip," she said, adding that his last bank holdup was at Winnemucca, Nevada, where he got away with $30,000.

Butch Cassidy visited Mrs. Bettenson and other relatives in Utah in 1925, and was later seen in Los Angeles and the Northwest. It was a request of her father, Maxmillian Parker, that she not reveal where Butch died and was buried.

It was reported that Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid were shot to death in South America, but the fact was that Butch was laid up elsewhere with an injured leg at the time. Later, he rendezvoused in Mexico with Sundance and Etta Place, the schoolteacher who had earlier accompanied the two celebrated bandits on a vacation in New York "when Coney Island was the place," and on to South America to avoid Pinkerton detectives.

Commenting that Butch "was not afraid of work and could do just about anything," Mrs. Bettenson said she knew of only two banks they robbed in South America and her brother was so well liked by the owner of a tin mine in Peru where he worked that he was trusted with the payroll.

She said that Butch was not in favor of Sundance's taking Etta Place with them to South America, but he described her as "a lovely person and a helluva good cook."

Butch Cassidy was named Robert LeRoy after two grandfathers. The Parkers left England to join Mormon converts leaving the Missouri River and reached Salt Lake City with the handcart pioneers in 1856.

Butch was the pride and joy of his mother, Ann Campbell Parker. The Cassidy tag is believed to have come from an old-time Utah cattle rustler.

His first arrest came in Montrose, Colorado, where he had gone to work in the mines. He was acquitted on a charge of horse thievery, Mrs. Bettenson said, after he proved that the horse he took from a pasture actually belonged to him. "The water buckets were always full and the wood box was never empty wherever Butch worked, people always said, and he used to write home real often, sending money when he could." Robert LeRoy Parker died in the northwest [definite date unknown], a year before his father's death.

Source:
Lula Parker Bettenson.

 

For the first several years after leaving home, Parker rode the fringe between being an outlaw and a migrant cowboy. He worked several ranches as well as one time in a butcher shop at Rock Springs, Wyoming, from which he took the name "Butch"; and to not bring shame upon honest parents, he added the name Cassidy, most likely in respect for his old mentor. Moving from being a rustler, for which he served a two-year stint in a Wyoming jail from 1894 to 1896, to master planner of the robbery of trains, banks, and mine payrolls came naturally for Cassidy. With his quick wit and native charm, coupled with his fearlessness and bravery, he never lacked for willing companions to assist in his plans. By 1896 his gang had dubbed themselves the "Wild Bunch." This gang consisted of several well-known Western outlaws including Harry Longabaugh, known as the Sundance Kid; Harvey Logan, alias Kid Curry; Ben Kilpatrick, the Tall Texan; Harry Tracy, Elzy Lay (who was Butch's best friend), and several others. Operating around the turn of the century, Cassidy and his partners put together the longest sequence of successful bank and train robberies in the history of the American West.

Mike Cassidy had led the small band of robbers and rustlers but, after having shot a Wyoming rancher, he disappeared. Butch Cassidy took over the gang. The gang's hideout was at Robber's Roost, located in the southwest corner of Utah, a rough, mountainous area, which was difficult to find. In early 1887, Cassidy met Bill and Tom McCarty, hard-riding outlaws who headed up their own gang, which included Matt Warner (real name Willard Christiansen), Tom O'Day, Silver Tip (Bill Wall), Maxwell, and Indian Ed Newcomb. When the McCarty brothers asked Butch Cassidy join them in a train robbery, the apprentice happily agreed. On Nov. 3, 1887 Cassidy and the McCartys stopped the Denver and Rio Grande express near Grand Junction, Colo. The express guard refused to open the safe and Bill McCarty put a pistol to his head. "Should we kill him?" he asked.

"Let's vote," Cassidy said.

The gang members voted not to kill the guard and the train moved off leaving the bandits empty-handed. Cassidy went back to rustling cattle and occasional trying to make an honest living while working as a cowboy or a miner in Colorado and Utah.

On Mar. 30, 1889, Cassidy again joined the McCartys and Matt Warner on another raid, this time they robed the First National Bank of Denver of $20,000. Tom McCarty approached the bank president that day and stated: "Excuse me, sir, but I just overheard a plot to rob this bank."

The bank president nervously asked: "Lord! How did you learn of this plot?" "I planned it," McCarty said, raising his gun "Put up your hands."

With this successful robbery Warner immediately opened a saloon (with his share), but Cassidy and the McCartys decided to rob another bank and, on June 24, 1889, successfully robbed the bank of Telluride, Colorado of $10,500. Local law officials formed huge posses in a extensive search for the gang, but the robbers made their getaway and went into hiding. Cassidy decided to follow the straight and narrow path and he took several jobs with ranches as a cowboy. He even worked as a butcher in Rock Springs, Wyo. which is where he earned his name "Butch."

Cassidy and Al Hainer then began an extortion racket in Colorado. They would sell local ranchers protection, telling them that they would make sure that cattle were not rustled if the ranchers agreed to pay them a fee. If a rancher decided not to pay this fee, then Butch and Al would simply steal their cattle. Complaining ranchers caused lawmen John Chapman and Bob Calverly to track down Cassidy and Hainer. The lawmen captured Al Hainer outside of the rustler’s cabin and tied him to a tree. Bob Calverly, with his gun drawn, entered the cabin where Butch was relaxing. When Butch saw Calverly, he jumped for his guns and gun belt, which were on the otherside of the room. Calverly fired four shots, one of which creased Cassidy's scalp and knocked him unconscious. Butch and Al were tried and found guilty for extortion and sentenced to two years at the penitentiary in Laramie City, Wyoming. At the end of a year and half, he applied for a pardon and was granted a hearing with Governor William Richards.

"My time is three-fourths done," Cassidy said, "and a few more months won't make much difference. I've got some property in Colorado that needs looking after, and I'd like to get a pardon."

"If it's your intention to go straight after you get out, perhaps it could be arranged," replied the governor. "You're still young, and smart enough to make a success in almost any line. Will you give me your word that you will quit rustling."

"Can't do that, governor," replied Cassidy, "because if I gave you my word I'd only have to break it. I'm in too deep now to quit the game. But I'll promise you one thing, if you give me a pardon I'll not commit any more crimes in Wyoming."

Butch Cassidy in the Wyoming State Prison

William Richards was impressed with Cassidy's frankness and believed that he would keep his word. The pardon was signed and Cassidy walked out of the Wyoming penitentiary a free man, on January 19, 1896.

Upon Cassidy's release, he rode to a hideout called Hole-in-the-Wall. This hideout was located in Wyoming and was considered more of a fortress then just a difficult place to find (such as Robber's Roost). At Hole-in-the-Wall, Cassidy met the Logan brothers, Harvey (known as "Kid Curry") and Lonnie. Harvey Logan was one of the meanest outlaws of the "Wild Bunch, a known killer and a man few people dared to cross. Harvey logan took his alias "Kid Curry" from another well known Hole-in-the-Wall bandit named Big Nose George Curry. Cassidy also met such gunmen and outlaws as Bob Meeks and William Ellsworth (known as Elza Lay. Cassidy became the natural leader of this last group of outlaws and he convinced them that their days of easy pickings were over and that each robbery needed extensive scouting and planning. He told them about how his friend, Bill McCarty and his brother Fred McCarty had been shot to pieces while trying to rob the bank in Delta, Colorado on Sept. 27, 1893. Another friend, Matt Warner, had been captured while trying to rob a bank and was given a long prison term.

Butch Cassidy, Bob Meeks and Elzy Lay robbed the Montpelier Bank on August 13, 1896 (the take was $7,165). The success of this robbery was due to the fact that Butch had scouted the town a few weeks before. On April 21, 1897, Butch, Elzy Lay and Joe Walker, traveled to a mining camp at Castle Gate, Utah and robbed a mining payroll. The take was just over $8,000 and the bandit’s left without firing a shot. Butch then rode to a New Mexico ranch with Lay where the two of them took jobs as cowboys.

When the money ran out, Butch and Lay left the ranch and rode back to Hole-in-the-Wall and gathered other outlaws to rob the bank at Belle Fourche, South Dakota. Joining Butch was Harvey Logan, Tom O'Day, Walt Putney, and Indian Billy Roberts. Again, no gunfire took place, and the take was almost $5,000.

Butch, George "Flat-Nose" Curry, Harvey Logan, Elza Lay, Lonny Logan, Ben Kilpatrick, Sundance Kid. (Harry Longbaugh), and Ben Beeson stopped the Union Pacific's Overland Flyer on June 2, 1899. The train came to a stop before a small trestle (that had been barricaded by the bandits). Butch ordered the engineer to uncouple the express car and move the rest of the train over the trestle. The engineer refused and Harvey Logan pistol-whipped him. This beating still did not persuade the engineer to move the train, so Lay jumped into the cab moved the train forward over the trestle. The bandits had placed a small charge of dynamite on the trestle and it blew just as the engine crossed the bridge. The separated express car was now left alone and the gang quickly surrounded it and called out to the guard inside, the man who identified himself as Woodcock. When ordered to open the express car door, the guard yelled: "Come in and get me!" Dynamite was placed next to the door and the fuse was lit. The explosion ripped the express car in half and sent Woodcock flying out to ground. Harvey Logan running up to the badly injured Woodcock, pulled his gun and shouted: "This damned fellow is going to hell!"

Cassidy interfered and said: "Now Harvey, a man with that kind of nerve deserves not to be shot." Meanwhile the rest of the bandits ran around picking up more than $30,000 in bank notes which, had been scattered by the explosion. This spectacular raid caused the Union Pacific to bring in the Pinkerton Detective Agency, which sent scores of agents after the outlaws. Dozens of posses led by such famous man hunters as Charles Siringo and N.K. Boswell, were on the trail of the gang. Cassidy decided that the best way for the outlaws to escape was for the Wild Bunch to split up. He, the Sundance Kid, who had become Cassidy's most loyal companion, and Ben Kilpatrick rode toward Hole-in-the-Wall while Logan, Curry, and Lay took a more circuitous route and were cornered by a large posse near Teapot Creek, Wyo.

The outlaws took refuge behind boulders while several possemen, including Sheriff Joe Hazen, charged their position. Hazen was shot off his horse, dead, by the sharp-shooting Harvey Logan. The outlaws then mounted their horses and, blazing away with their six-guns, shot their way through the ranks of the disorganized lawmen. Logan and Curry rode on alone while Lay joined notorious bandits, Thomas "Black Jack" Ketchum and G.W. Franks, and held up a Colorado Southern train on July 11, 1899, at Twin Mountains, N.M., stealing $30,000. The next day, the three bandits were surrounded at Turkey Creek Canyon, N.M., by a determined posse. A gunfight ensued and Lay was wounded twice and Ketchum once. The outlaws shot and killed Sheriff Edward Farr, Tom Smith, and W.H. Love before escaping. Ketchum was later captured and hanged for train robbery in a gruesome execution. Lay was trapped by lawmen in August 1899 and subdued after a desperate fight. He was given a life term and sent to the New Mexico Territorial Prison on Oct. 10, 1899. He would be paroled in 1906 and reform, living until 1934.

Despite losing some of his best riders, Cassidy put together another band of outlaws for another train raid. These bandits included Harvey Logan, who had managed to ride through several posses and return to Hole-in-the-Wall following the wild Wilcox robbery, the Sundance Kid, Ben Beeson, Ben Kilpatrick, and Laura Bullion, the Tall Texan's girlfriend. They stopped the Union Pacific's Train Number 3 at Tipton, Wyo., on Aug. 29, 1900. Ironically, the express guard, Woodcock, was in the mail car and he again refused to open the door to the bandits. Butch shook his head in disgust and then said to the engineer: "You tell that iron-headed Woodcock that if he doesn't open the door this time, we're going to blow up him and the whole damned car sky high!" When the engineer pleaded with Woodcock, the plucky guard finally relented and threw open the door. The bandits blew open the safe and took more than $50,000, the largest haul taken by the gang up to that time.

Joe Lefors, one of the most feared lawmen of the era, was assigned by the Union Pacific to track down Cassidy and his gang at all costs. He wore out fifty men and twice as many horses chasing the Wild Bunch across Wyoming but lost them when they slipped into their mountainous hideout, Hole-in-the-Wall. The gang rode out again to strike the bank at Winnemucca, Nev., taking $30,000 on Sept. 19, 1900. The gang next rode to Wagner, Montana, where Cassidy, Logan, Kilpatrick, the Sundance Kid, and Deaf Charley Hanks stopped the Great Northern Flyer on July 3, 1901. (The Sundance Kid had robbed a train near this spot almost ten years earlier.) Two of the men boarded the train, and as the train got up steam, Logan climbed into the engineer's cab by crawling over the coal tender, dropping down with two six-guns in his hands and ordering the engineer to stop the train. The Sundance Kid and Ben Kilpatrick raced through the passenger cars, firing their six-guns into the ceiling and shouting to the startled passengers: "Keep your heads inside the car!" When the train came to a small trestle, it ground to a stop where Cassidy and Hanks were waiting. Cassidy planted a charge of dynamite beneath the Adams Express car and blew off its side. More than $40,000 was taken from the safe but most of it was in unsigned bank notes. This didn't seem to bother the outlaws, Bill Carver or someone else with good penmanship merely signed the notes and these were quickly cashed or passed. Following the Wagner robbery, the Wild Bunch split up for the last time. Ben Kilpatrick and Laura Bullion rode east and were later arrested in Memphis with part of the loot taken from the Wagner robbery. Both were given long prison terms. When Kilpatrick was released in 1912, he attempted another train robbery and was killed by an aggressive express car guard. Harvey Logan was later wounded and trapped by a posse and, rather than be taken captive, sent a bullet into his brain.

The fate of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid after that has been much in debate. Butch and Sundance rode to Fort Worth, Texas, to relax in Fannie Porter's luxurious brothel. The Sundance Kid then took up with a bored teacher and housewife, Etta (or Ethel) Place, an attractive brunette who seemed to long for adventure. She left with Butch and Sundance when they decided that the West was too "hot" for them, all three going, first to New York to stay in the finest hotels.

In late 1901, Butch, Sundance and Etta traveled to Buenos Aires and settled in southern Argentina. They took the names James Ryan and Mr. and Mrs. Harry Place ("Place" was Sundance's mothers maiden name). They built a cabin in the Cholila Valley and began a peaceful life as ranchers. For the next three years, the trio settled down and made a living raising cattle, horses and sheep. They made many friends in the area and if any of their neighbors knew about their outlaw backgrounds, they kept it to themselves.

In February of 1905, the bank of Rio Gallegos was robbed and authorities suspected Butch and Sundance had committed this crime. Before authorities could catch up with Butch and Sundance, a local sheriff, who was a good friend of theirs, warned the pair of their impending arrest. After three years of the quiet life, the outlaws were on the run again. This time the outlaws crossed the border into Chile and hid out for a few months. With most of their money gone, the outlaws returned to a life of crime. In late 1905, Butch, Sundance, Etta and another man robbed the bank in Mercedes, Argentina. They escaped back to Chile, with several posses chasing them. Not long after this, Etta seems to have returned to the United States and into oblivion.

In 1906, while the authorities were looking for two English-speaking bandits, Butch and Sundance split up. Butch found work at a tin mine in central Bolivia, while Sundance worked for a Argentinean contractor. A few months later, Sundance joined Butch at the Bolivian mine, where they became guards. Butch again wanted to settle down and they began looking for a place where they could start a ranch and raise livestock. In early 1908, Butch and Sundance quit their jobs at the mine, after reports of their criminal past resurfaced in the area. During the next few months, two railroad payrolls near the city of La Paz, Bolivia, had been robbed. Again, fingers were being pointed at the two American outlaws. They drifted south, where they planned the robbery of mining payroll near Salo, Bolivia. The payroll was being carried and guarded by only one man, Carlos Pero. Accompanying Carlos on this trip was his young son. The two carried few weapons and lead a small train of mules as they headed for the town of Quechisla. On November 4, as they rounded a rocky bend in the road, they saw two masked men holding rifles. Butch ordered Carlos to hand over the payroll. Carlos was in no position to argue or put up a fight, he handed over mining payroll and Butch and Sundance headed south. Carlos and his son continued north and alerted authorities along the way of the robbery. All local law officials were now looking for the two American bandits, so Butch and Sundance traveled mostly at night and rested during the day.

On the night of November 6, 1908, Butch and Sundance arrived in the town of San Vicente. They were looking for a place to stay and were directed to the home of Bonifacio Casaola. The room that Butch and Sundance were given had one doorway that opened up into a walled patio, no windows and no back door. After guiding the two outlaws, the local man who directed Butch and Sundance to Casaola's home, alerted four local soldiers that two strangers were in town. The soldiers gathered their rifles and ammunition and headed for the house. The soldiers entered the patio at the same time Butch was coming out of the doorway. Butch drew his gun and fired, hitting one of the soldiers. The other soldiers returned fire and backed out of the patio, positioning themselves around the wall. Butch and Sundance desperately tried to defend themselves from the doorway, but the soldiers were able to fire into the room from different angles, hitting the outlaws several times. Most of outlaw's ammunition was still on the mules outside, so the gunfight couldn't last very long. As the gunfire slowed down, the soldiers and witnesses reported hearing desperate screams coming from inside the room and a couple of gunshots. The soldiers remained behind the walls for the rest of the night and then ordered the owner of the home to go inside to see if the two men were still inside. Bonifacio entered the room to find both men dead. Butch was lying on the floor with a bullet in his temple and another one in his arm. Sundance was sitting on a bench with several bullets in his arms and one in his forehead. It was concluded by local authorities that Butch had shot Sundance with his second to last bullet and then used the last bullet on himself. They were buried later that day, but dug up two weeks later to be positively identified by Carlos Pero.

Another story has it that only Sundance was killed in the murderous crossfire and that he gave his money belt and a letter to his best friend Butch. After watching the mortally wounded Sundance die, Butch, under the cover of darkness, escaped. There are many unsupported stories claiming that Cassidy returned to his birthplace of Circleville, Utah, and changed his name, living out his life there and dying in 1929. Most of Butch's family believe he died in San Vicente, there was never any proof that he ever made it back to the United States and escaped the law that had tracked him halfway across the world.

Here is a recent article taken from the Deseret News, May 2000. By Carma Wadley. It mentions Agatha Applegate Nay, the author of the above history.

On a late summer day when Agatha Applegate Nay was nearly 12, she was sent out collecting money for the newspaper her family run in the little town of Circleville Utah. One of the homes she stopped at was that of Maximilliam Parker, a red brick house in the center of town. Mr. Parker-his wife was dead by then-stepped into the kitchen, and then here came his son, Butch, said Nay, who at the age of 84 has lived in Circleville most of her life. “He stood over against the wall and he started asking all about my family” She remembers Butch as being rather short. “My father was a tall man, but Butch was short. He was nice looking. He wanted to know all about the Applegate’s. This would have been 1925, long after the outlaw had supposedly killed in Bolivia. “I know for a fact he didn’t die there.” said Nay. But she never told her mother about seeing Butch. “Mother told me to hurry back and I was late getting home. I was afraid she’d ask me where I had been. But she didn’t. I’m glad she didn’t ask, I couldn’t have lied” Nay, in act, never did tell he mother, never told anyone for a long time. “The Parkers were good people” said Nay.

End. Edited by Rod Dalton, Nov. 1999 from a copyright story.

Some notes about Circleville:

CIRCLEVILLE:
Quiet Of This Peaceful Town Rudely Shocked By Seismic Disturbance.

Special Correspondence.

Circleville, Piute Co., Nov. 14--Last night the quiet of our little town was rudely disturbed by an earthquake that shook the houses from the very foundations, displacing things from shelves and cupboards and overturning tables. Some of the people ran from the houses screaming, while others fainted.

[Deseret Evening News; November 16, 1901]

Circleville Road Crew, 1903:

The following Dalton family men and some in-laws provided their teams and put in three days' labor each (or six days' labor for those who had no teams) for construction and repair of the road from the Garfield County line north as far as "Mitchell's Crossing". Each man was credited with $3 toward his taxes for that year.

M.C. Dalton

Morgan Dalton

C.R. Dalton

J.C. Whittaker

John Whittaker

Taylor Whittaker

George Fox

William Nay

Arthur Whittaker

John Nay

George Willey

James Willey

George Whittaker

Source: From a history of Piute County; by Ardis Parshall of Orem Utah.

The following is the history of Charles Robert Dalton of Circleville Utah. Charles Robert was the third son of Charles Albert and Sarah Wiley Dalton and the grandson of Charles Wakeman and Julietta Bowen:

Source of this is from a history of Piute County; by Ardis Parshall of Orem, Utah.

Charles Robert Dalton:

Born 22 November 1873, at Beaver, Beaver, Utah. Married Virginia Peterson, 8 February 1899. Children:

Charles Delbert Dalton, born 6 November 1899, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Robert Elwood Dalton, born 11 July 1901, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Reva V. Dalton, born 11 February 1904, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Ruby LaVern Dalton, born 13 January 1906, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Elva Lauree Dalton, born 13 July 1908, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Kenneth LaVar Dalton, born 1 March 1911, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Arthur W. Dalton, born 17 December 1917, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Married Martha Amy Robinson, 14 February 1919.

Children:
Hazel LaRetta Dalton, born 19 April 1914, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Died 25 July 1938, at Richfield, Sevier, Utah. Buried at Circleville.

Blessed 1874. Baptized 22 July 1882, by Daniel S. Gillies; confirmed 23 July 1882, by Thomas Day. Ordained a deacon, 19 April 1898, by Laban D. Morrill; ordained an elder, May 1900, by J.P. Jensen; ordained a high priest, 29 August 1915, by James Houston. Ordained first counsel to Bishop Benjamin Cameron, Jr., 29 August 1915. Temple sealing (Martha Amy Robinson) May 1919.

25 July 1938: Farmer and stockman. Died at Sevier Valley Hospital, of pneumonia and nephritis. Funeral services held 27 July 1938 at Circleville chapel, conducted by bishop.

1880: Living in Circle Valley.

1908-09: Farming 50 acres (value: $715), in Circleville.

1911-12: Farming 60 acres (value: $600), at Circleville.

1911-1919 - Charles R. served as a counselor in the Bishopric Two of his sons have served as Bishops - Elwood & Arthur and several grandsons have served in Bishoprics and Stake Presidencies.

1916-1920 - Charles R. was elected as a 4 year Co. Commissioner Note: his grandfather, Charles Wakeman Dalton served as the first Sheriff of Washington County

1916-17: Farming 94 acres (value: $1610), at Circleville.

19 September 1918: Patriotic Men Make Response to Call. Responding to the call of the Nation for recruits for the army, the loyal citizens of Piute county between the ages of 18 and 45, both inclusive, flocked to the registration places last Thursday and when the totals had been counted in the several registration offices throughout the county, 297 names had been recorded. The county fell short just forty names, according to the number allotted. Piute county had been set aside to furnish 337, but only 297 men were registered. The officers have announced that a close canvas will be made and the county thoroughly “combed” for any slacker and should any be found they will be made to suffer the penalty as prescribed for failing to register. Reports from all the registration offices throughout the county are to the effect that the work was done expeditiously and that there was not the least semblance of disorder. The day had been declared holiday and all business houses were closed for the occasion. The following is a list of the men registered:

Circleville... Charles Robert Dalton.

14 November 1918: Subscribed for bonds “of the fourth issue” (World War I war bonds), at Circleville. Appears on list of “persons whose registration cards are in the possession of” Piute County Draft Board, W.W.I.- era.

1920: Living in Circleville. Farmer, home/farm. Can read and write.

1920-21: Commissioner.

5 June 1920: A Democratic convention was held at Junction, Tuesday, June 1. E.S. Anderson of Marysvale, and Chas. Dalton of Circleville, were elected as delegates to the state convention, at Salt Lake City, Monday, June 14. Wallace Johnson was elected chairman of the Democratic county committee and C.A. Blakeslee, secretary.

1920-21: Farming 17 acres (value: $2140), at Circleville.

1921 - Charles R. called to serve in Stake High Council. Delbert and Arthur served on High Councils. More than ten grandsons have served on High Councils. Grandson, Stanley Dalton, served as President of the Panguitch Stake, and upon his release was ordained as Stake Patriarch, also the Justice of the Peace of Circleville.

1922-23: Farming 100 acres (value: $7,540), at Circleville.

1924-1941 - Charles R. served as Mayor of Circleville. His accomplishments:

1924-25: Farming 79 acres (value: $5,488), at Circleville.

1927 - Charles and Son, Arthur personally made the cement blocks for the Circleville Auditorium. The blocks were laid by Thomas Thomas and Billie Thomas.

25 March 1927: A baby boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. Carl Whittaker on March 17. Mrs. Whittaker was formerly Ruby Dalton, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Dalton.

25 July 1930: Miss Helen Barnson left last week for Circleville where she will spend a short time visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Dalton.

6 February 1931: Senator W.T. Owens of Panguitch and Representative Charles R. Dalton of Circleville stopped in Junction a short time on Sunday on their way to Salt Lake City. These two gentlemen came home over the weekend while the legislature was inspecting the branch Agriculture College at Cedar City.

26 February 1931: Piute - Sevier Boundary Line Fully Outlined. Commissioners of Two Counties Reach Decision; Koosharem in Sevier. A final agreement as to the boundary line between Sevier and Piute counties, which has been a source of dispute ever since the two counties were organized, has now been effected and was definitely outlined by the commissioners of the two counties, and the county attorneys, Gilbert R. Beebe of Piute and T.A. Hunt of Sevier, in a meeting held here Thursday evening. Heretofore, several attempts have been made to solve the difficulties In about 1901, Homer McCarty, county surveyor of Sevier county, and the surveyor from Piute county drew a boundary line. It was not altogether satisfactory, however, and Piute county, some years later, employed an engineer and endeavored to establish another line. This line was not agreeable, and following a lawsuit the McCarty line was again adopted. Difficulties arose from the fact that land along the boundary was assessed to both counties, and if an individual paid taxes to one county and not to the other, the county not receiving tax money claimed the right to sell his land for delinquent taxes. While the state legislature was in special session last spring, the commissioners got together and agreed on a line that followed the quarter section line delinquent taxes. While the state legislature was in special session last spring, the commissioners got together and agreed on a line that followed the quarter section line three-fourths of a mile south of the town of Koosharem, to the range lines between ranges two and three west, north three-fourths of a mile on the range and west again on the forty line to the intersection of Beaver county, thus establishing the line on a government survey. Early in this session of the legislature Charles Dalton, representative from Piute county, introduced a bill before the house, house bill No. 40, incorporating in it the preliminary settlement. Following the state engineer’s suggestion he sent his outline to the commissioners of the two counties, who met here Thursday and confirmed the agreement and with the county attorneys formulated necessary amendments to house bill No. 40, which they returned to Representative Dalton and Jorgensen. The boundary is now exactly and minutely described and with the adoption of the bill will undoubtedly settle all difficulties. With the new boundary, Koosharem comes within Sevier county the line running about three-fourths of a mile south of the town. Among other things this will relieve the difficulties which have confronted the school boards in previous years when part of Koosharem’s school children were claimed by Sevier county and part by Piute county making adjustments necessary in the expenditure of funds by the respective school boards for the education of Koosharem school children.

 

6 March 1931:Puffer Lake Road. As has been noted in the columns of the News the counties of Beaver and Piute are anxious to make a connecting link between routes 89 and 91– Junction to Beaver – a distance of approximately 25 miles or one-third the distance now necessarily traveled between these two county seats by the way of Sevier-Cove Fort Route. There is now a travelable road about four-fifths of the distance between Junction and Beaver while it will be necessary to make a new road up the mountain on the East side of Puffers Lake. For the purpose of advancing this road and with the hope of securing some part of the $108,000.00 allotted to Southern Utah under the Colton-Oddie bill, a committee consisting of Hon. Charles R. Dalton, Comm., Dwight L. Fullmer, John W. Robinson, LeRoy Barlow, V.R. Johnson, McKinley Morrill and N.W. Christensen, visited Mr. Finch of the Bureau of Public Roads only to be met at the threshold by Mr. Finch with a statement something similar to one made back in the early history of one of the sects of our commonwealth. “Your cause may be just but I an do nothing for you” for maybe four or five or six years to come. In other words, the boys felt like they had been doused with a bucket of Ogden’s coldest ice water as they left Mr. Finch’s Office. The committee then visited the office of Mr. Rutledge, Chief Forester for Utah, whose cordial greeting, hearty handshake and pleasant smile soon dispelled the gloom and chilliness from their persons and made them feel like they were really in the presence of a person who considered his duty to the public of more importance than any compliments to his personality. Mr. Rutledge stated to the Committee that it would be a pleasure for the Forest Department to take up a road program that would open up the vast resources of this part of the Forest Reserve and while the most of the funs available for 1931 had been budgeted they would try and salvage enough to make the survey and construct the three and one-half miles of road covering the steepest part of the mountain, provided the County would put in on the basis of 25-75. Our Committee returned from Ogden very much elated over the encouragement received from Mr. Rutledge and then at a meeting of the County Commissioners held on Monday the 2nd instant, the County Commissioners made an order directing Clerk Ipson to notify Mr. Rutledge that they would be pleased to cooperate with the Forest Department on the basis named, and were much in hopes that early action could be taken on this much needed project. / In order to ease the burdens of the taxpayers the Committee’s recommendation is that one-half of the County’s portion be furnished by the citizens of Junction and surrounding towns to be paid for in labor at times when called upon. This course we think very commendable and urge the citizens when called upon to do as they did in the early days of the war, “Contribute until it hurts!”

10 July 1931: Miss Helen Barnson went to Circleville to visit with Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Dalton.

26 July 1938: Charles Robert Dalton, 64, of Circleville, died late Sunday in a Richfield hospital. He was born at Beaver, Nov. 23, 1874, son of Charles Albert and Sarah Wiley Dalton. He married Virginia Peterson on Feb. 3, 1899. She died Dec. 17, 1917. He married Mrs. Amy Robinson Stewart on Feb. 4, 1920. She died April 7, 1938. Mr. Dalton was active in political and civic affairs of this county, having served as a representative in the Legislature and as mayor of Circleville for a number of years. He was a Republican. He was a member of the Church and counselor under former Bishop Ben Cameron. He is survived by four sons and three daughters, Delbert C., Robert E., Kenneth L., and Arthur Dalton, Mrs. Elva Whittaker and Mrs. Ruby Whittaker, all of Circleville, and Mrs. Hazel Barlow of Junction; several grandchildren; four sisters and two brothers, Mrs. Edna Peterson and Mrs. Sarah Neilson of Salt Lake City; Mrs. Ada Poulson of Ephraim; Roy Dalton of Payson; Mrs. Caroline Wiltshire and Wiley Dalton of Circleville. Services will be conducted by Bishop James L. Whittaker Wednesday at 2 p.m. in the ward here. Burial will be in Circleville cemetery.

Sources:
Gravestone.

Richfield Reaper: 5 June 1920, 26 February 1931.

Deseret News: 26 July 1938.

Garfield County News: 25 March 1927.

Piute Chieftain: 19 September 1918, 14 November 1918.

Piute County News: 25 July 1930, 6 February 1931, 6 March 1931, 10 July 1931.

 

Robert Elwood Dalton gives this account of his grandfather, Charles Albert Dalton and his father, Charles Robert Dalton:
“My grandparents on my father's side were Charles Albert Dalton and Sarah Jane Wiley. They were married in the Beaver area and they came as married people from Beaver over to Circleville in 1874. They were among the early settlers in Circleville. My grandfather homestead a hundred and sixty-acre plot in what became, in later years, the center part of Circleville. He was also Postmaster for many years in Circleville. He had his children run the post office as well as operate the store.

In the early days it was really hard to make a living and Grandfather Peterson tried a number of things before he decided he would leave Circleville and go to Idaho. When he went to Idaho he lived in the vicinity of Leadore, Idaho on a ranch in the higher mountains. The winters got so cold that he had to move his family in the wintertime, from the high mountain area where his ranch was, down into Leadore, Idaho. As he grew older and was unable to farm any longer, he moved down into Leadore and lived there. He was unable to pay for his farm and lost the farm. But he spent the rest of his life in Leadore, Idaho. He had a young daughter that stayed and lived there after he passed away. Her name was Leda Peterson Dalby, and she is the one that kept and collected the genealogy of my grandfather Peterson's family.

My grandfather Charles Albert Dalton, in the early part of his life in Circleville, carried the mail from Marysvale to Panquitch. One day he would go from Circleville to Marysvale and get the mail and then come back to Circleville, (he did his mail carrying in a small buggy pulled by two horses) then he would make the trip to Panquitch and deliver the mail in Panquitch the day after he had gotten it in Marysvale. So every other day he got the mail delivered to Panquitch, every other day he got the mail from Marysvale. That kept him occupied almost all the time. Even though it was really hard and difficult in the wintertime, it was the best means he had found to provide the necessary things for his family. He did this until he grew quite old and was unable to carry the mail any longer. Then he came and worked with the farm and a few cows and a few sheep, and made his living as best he could without as much exposure to the cold weather. He grew quite old before he passed away. He became somewhat crippled up in his hands and his legs and we always kinda felt sorry for him as he tried to walk and do the things that were difficult for him.

My father's name is Charles Robert Dalton. He is the oldest living son of my grandparents because the two older children (boys) died while small infants. He grew up as a boy on the estate that grandfather had built his home on. My father as a boy rode a pony to get to school. In those days the school was in the lower part of Circleville, so he would ride the pony down to school and at the end of the day ride the pony back. My mother, Virginia Peterson, was close enough to school so she was able to walk t o school. They were educated in a one-room school (at the time they were growing up that was all that they had). All the boys and girls went into that one room whether they were little or big and one teacher taught all the classes. My father said that it was quite hard sometimes to keep your mind on what you were studying because sometimes you were listening to what went on in the other grades of the school. But they learned a great deal while in that school and it helped him to meet his obligations and do the things that were necessary in his later life. They got by in those schools and learned the fundamentals of the rudiments of math, english, geography, and history so that they had a pretty good country education when they got out and graduated from what was then the eight grade. That gave them about eight years in school in their younger years. There wasn't any high school in our area at that time and our parents were not given the opportunity to gain a high school education.

Their education largely came as they grew up, and with their experiences in life, they learned a lot of things that they didn't learn in school. It has been said that experience keeps a dear school and in our day a great many lessons are learned in the school of experience. Experience is a good teacher because it helps you to be able to adjust to new circumstances and new conditions and appreciate your blessings as they came along.

My mother and her younger brother were assigned the responsibility of taking the cows up to what was called the bench, out west of town. They had to drive the cows about a mile and half through the lanes to get up to the land that wasn't a part of people’s farms. One day while they were driving the cows, the cow’s found a gap in the fence and got into an alfalfa field. It was the spring of the year, the cows were hungry, and the alfalfa was just high enough f or the cows to get a right good bite of it. They tried as best they could but there was just no way they could get those hungry cows out of that alfalfa field until one of them had keeled over and was dead. This broke the hearts of the children to such a degree (the cow was so essential for them to get the food they needed and a means of providing for the family) t hat they felt like the loss was just overwhelming. So mother and her younger brother knelt down and ask the Lord to bring the cow back to life. The Lord rewarded the faith of those little children. The cow started to breath again and after a few minutes it got up, walked out of the gap where they couldn't force it to go out of before, and joined the other cows. They took the cows up to the bench and that cow lived for several years after that. Mother always bore a testimony that she knew her prayer was answered by our Father in Heaven and He raised that cow back to life in response to that prayer they had offered.

My Mother was the person that really had a lot of faith. She was really the spiritual leader in our home. Lots of time she would get up early in the morning when we needed to go to Sunday School and she would get all of the children ready and we would drive to Sunday School in the little black topped buggy. In those days the buggy was pulled by one horse, in what we called a pair of shafts. The horse was placed in those shafts and that was what, as we guided the horse, guided the buggy. One day the wind was blowing awfully hard and that horse got scared of something and ran away. Delbert, my older brother, and my mother were trying t o hold the horse. But it kept going and running, in order to follow the course it was going on, it had to cross a ruff ditch. When it crossed that ruff ditch Mother and Delbert were thrown out of the buggy, and that left the rest of us kids still riding the buggy. The horse kept running and since I was the oldest child there I kept trying to get the younger kids to jump out of the buggy so they wouldn't get more seriously hurt. Every time one would climb out it would fall down because of the speed that the buggy was going and when they hit the ground they couldn't keep their balance. I had them all out but two by the time that the horse was stopped. A man by the name of Billy Mansor saw that the horse was running away and that there was no one in the buggy to drive it, so he jumped over the fence, stopped the horse and tied it up to the fence. I was sure thankful that he was able to get it stopped because I didn't know exactly what was going to happen to the rest of us that hadn't got out of the buggy. When I saw that everything was all right, I got the other two children out of the buggy and walked back to see what had happened to mother. She had been quite badly bruised but she hadn't had any broken bones. Grandmother Peterson took her into her home and she was lying on the bed. It took a day or two before she was able to come home but we were sure thankful that she hadn't been more seriously hurt.

Our mother was really the person that taught us a great many of the lessons that we valued in life. She taught us how to work and how to do the things that needed to be done in the home. Each one of us as a child had a responsibility (a task; a chore) that we had to do every morning and every night. We knew that was ours and we accepted that responsibility and did that thing without any one having to ask or prod us to do the job. That was a great experience. As young people we learned patience, we learned industry, and we learned to cope with difficulties. Every once in a while something would go wrong and we had to find our own solution for solving the problem. It has been a great help to us all our lives.

We can credit our mother for the religious training of our family. Our father didn't feel he had the time, at that time, to take much time with the members of the family. He was a good worker and a good provider but we received a great deal more of the training from our mother than we did from our father.

One of the saddest things in my life was the passing of my mother when I was 16 years old. When Arthur, the youngest son, was born, she bled to death and died during the night. Father came and woke me up to go and get Olive Norton, who was a midwife, to come at that time and when I got back I was released from my errand and I went up and went to bed. I didn't know that Mother had died until I got up that next morning. Most of my heart died with my mother. It was years and years before I really felt like I could go on and face life alone because I missed her so much. She was my ideal and she was really the one who gave me encouragement when things got tough, she gave me counsel and guidance. I never will be able to fully replace her and I am looking forward to a time when we will be together again.

My father was a farmer in the early period of my life. He tells a story about the time when I was born. I was born at two o'clock in the afternoon. He had been working preparing so he would be with mother during that time. She took sick during the night, but it was two o'clock before I came into the world. I came in on the 11th of July in 1901. I have always regretted that I was born in July because I have always faced either a water turn or harvesting a hay crop on my birthday. I have really celebrated a lot of birthdays tromping hay in the field, or tending water with a water turn during my lifetime. If I had my choice again I would be born in October or November, and not in July. But sometimes we don't have our choice. Father always use to tell me that it had cost him a very important water turn to get me into the world, and now I owed a quite a responsibility to him to help him take care of the water turns because he had missed that one to get me into the world.”

 

More history of Charles Robert Dalton:
Charles Robert Dalton was one year old when his father traveled over the mountain to Circleville.

Charles R. Dalton and Virginia Peterson were married by Bishop James Ephriam Petersen, her father on Feb. 8, 1899. They were sealed in the Manti Temple on June 6, 1900. Grandma Sarah Jane went with them to Manti and to tend baby Charles Delbert. The round trip to Manti and back to Circleville by horse and wagon took ten days. They stayed with Charles Robert’s sister, Sarah Anderson in Ephriam.

Charles was a patient, kind and charitable husband. He was very considerate of Virginia’s special needs, especially when she was expecting a child. Virginia was responsible for the home and much of the garden and farm activities because Charles was often away on the freight line, farming or seeing to his sheep herd.

Charles R. Dalton and Virginia first home at 460 East 450 North had four rooms. The living room and kitchen were somewhat larger than the two bedrooms. The house faced North and was surrounded by fruit trees. Virginia’s sister, Maggie and her husband, Dennis Morgan, moved into this home when Virginia and Charles bought the Wixom Mansion in 1907. The home on 450 North was damaged by the Hatchtown flood and it was moved to 280 West 100 North where Scott Smith lived in it before using it as a granary.

Virginia was quite ill during her pregnancies and Charles R. often provided her with hired help for the home chores.

Charles Robert Dalton first attended school in a one-room log cabin. This cabin was possibly located at 1600 North 100 East. Charles Albert Dalton donated the two acres of land that the church and school were built at 410 North 100 East. It has often been referred to as the Log School on the Glen Bettenson Lot. Thadus Fullmer was the construction supervisor. His wife, Juliette Dalton was Albert's sister. Each family was assessed to donate 3 hewn logs of a certain size to be delivered to the site by a certain date, along with a cash donation for the purchase of a door hinges, locks, etc. and windows.

Elvira Dalton (Charles Albert's half sister) was the first teacher in the new school. The school year consisted of three-quarters of three months each. Students were required to attend 24 quarters in order to graduate from the 8th grade. Most of the students had to help their families with farming, cattle, sheep, etc. and could not attend school full time, especially in the fall and spring, so many of them were in their late teens when they finally graduated. Tuition was $3.00 a quarter for each student and the teacher was paid according to the number of students attending. When all the children in town were in attendance, the teachers paycheck was about $30.00 a month. Parents were expected to furnish pencils, slates (small blackboards), paper, books and lunch.

In 1927 Charles R. Dalton was the mayor and civic leader of Circleville and arranged for the construction of the cement block auditorium at 150 South 100 East. This building has housed many kinds of activities -- hotly contested athletic events including the famous Circleville Commercial Club Tournament; all social activities such as weddings, parties and weekly dances; and major productions of the performing arts (at least one each school quarter).

Charles Robert’s example of being responsible to himself, his community and to his God are exemplified by the activities he chose to spend his time being involved in.

Some key words that describe Charles R. Dalton are independent industrious, dependable, of sound judgment, honest, high integrity. These qualities are very evident in the lives of his descendants unto the third and fourth generations of leaders in the town of Circleville today.

In 1984 Charles' son, Arthur served as Mayor of Circleville --his major accomplishment was a new fire station and fencing of the springs supplying the city water system

In 1972 Grandson, Donald C. Whittaker served as Mayor of Circleville--his major accomplishments were $300,000 grant for improvement of water system and $295,000 grant to build the Circleville Elementary after the elementary school burned Donald also served as city clerk, supervising the cemetery and all finances. A total of 21 years served.

In 1978, Grandson, Clyde D. Whittaker served as Mayor of Circleville - his major accomplishments were the City Parks.

Grandson, Nordell Dalton, served on the Circleville City Council for about 20 years. His areas of responsibility were the cemetery, roads and waterworks. Nordell donated many hours of city maintenance' without financial reimbursement.

Even though he never held an elected position, Charles' son, Kenneth was very civic minded. He secured the first fire fighting equipment (truck, suits, hoses, etc.) for Circleville at a cost of $5,000 (part of which he personally paid). He built and operated a radio station, the airplane runway (he was a pilot and owned his own airplane), built and operated two sheep shearing plants powered by a Model A engine, operated Ken's Store.

Charles R. believed that the best way to teach responsibility was to give responsibility. His children were very independent and took responsibility for their own lives at an early age.

Delbert took responsibility for the farms. Elwood took responsibility for the sheep.

Reva and Ruby worked and boarded outside of the home at about the age of 14 and went away to school. Elva was more patient with Aunt Amy and stayed in the home until she married at age 18. Kenneth was very independent and 'did his own thing' Hazel lived at home until she was married. Arthur was exiled to the "dungeon" under the stairs by Amy. He idolized his brother Kenneth, and spent much of his time with him.

Charles' children were taught correct principles, given freedom to choose and reaped the consequences.

Virginia was her unloving happy nature and her bubbly personality. They enjoyed doing things together, dancing, parties, etc.

Virginia and Charles brought this love of life and having fun into their home. Their children's friends were always welcome and joined in the family fun. Parties and dances were held regularly in the large east 'ballroom' of their home. Their home was the center for teenage activities in Circleville. The visiting kids didn't mind obeying the rules of the home, and they felt welcome and like they belonged.

Charles R. purchased a radio when they first became available and it became another fun center in the home.

Virginia requested, and Charles purchased a new piano. (The first one in Circleville) The piano became the center of the family activities.

The Charles R. Dalton family was considered well to do financially. Charles owned a freighting company, cattle, sheep, shares in the bank at Marysvale.

When Virginia needed a buggy to transport the young children to Church five blocks away, Charles purchased the Black Top Buggy, a single seat with standing room. He also brought home a colt that was trained to pull the buggy and also could be used as a saddle horse. Croppy had his ears frozen off as a colt and was a family favorite. Another favorite was the Old Grey Mare, another horse trained to pull the buggy. A white top two-seat buggy was purchased as the family grew larger-in number and size.

Virginia Peterson Dalton always had the finest transportation available. Old Croppy (a colt with frozen-off ears) was rescued from the desert. He was harnessed and hitched to the buggy whenever Virginia wanted to leave the house. (even to go to the elementary school one block away) Her legs would swell up and her knees were painful. She would use the back of a chair to scoot around in the house. About 1913 on the way home from church (Kenneth was a baby) Croppy got scared and a runaway ensued. Croppy ran two blocks west, turned and went one block south, turned again, spilling Virginia and baby Ken into the ditch. Croppy headed east and raced for the barn. Ruby and Elva were still in the buggy, having the ride of their lives and scared to death. Walter Crow saw the runaway horse and buggy and ran out into the road, grabbed the horse' s bridle and stopped him at 100 S. 100 E.”

 

Donald Whittaker’s memories of his Grandpa, Charles Robert Dalton:
“What would life be without our grandmas and grandpas? There are many different names we call them by: Nana and Papa, Momma and Pappa, Granny and Gramps, etc. They are loving names for lovely people who enrich our lives in many ways. Many of us learned the art of cookie baking, horseback riding, fishing, farming or carpentry--just to name a few-- from our grandparents. They love us with a gentle relaxed, and nonjudgmental love. And best of all they love us just because of who we are--and that's a wonderful reason to be loved!

Charles Robert Dalton loved his grandchildren and they knew it. Don has many fond memories of times spent with Grandpa, Charles R'. Grandpa was an excellent hunter. He knew every hill and draw and just how to work them for the best hunting. He had two very special locations for getting big bucks. One was Charlie's Rock near the head of Cottonwood Canyon on the Wade Canyon Horse Trail that winds to the top of the mountain. His rock was north 100 yards from the 7th switchback.

Charles Robert's great grandsons, Daniel and David Whittaker started the Piute ATV by riding their 4-wheelers to the top of the mountain over those same switchbacks making the trail better with each trip. Perhaps this is the most fun spot on the 250-mile Piute ATV Trail.

The other favorite hunting spot was in Horse Valley where Grandpa had his summer range for his sheep. His son, Elwood, was his Herder and Arthur the Camp Tender. It was in this area that his sons and grandsons also liked to hunt. Grandpa taught his sons how to hunt this spot and they in turn taught his grandchildren. Don remembers being shown how to hunt around the Horse Valley Peak. Kenneth would drive his "stripped down" car (the first version of a jeep) around the rocks and through the washes to the saddle in Horse Valley. Here Delbert and Nordel, Elwood and Stanley, Carl and Donald would join in the hunt around the peak.

One season Don and Keith were hunting the East Canyon. They climbed to the stand on the rock. Deer started running in all directions. Don started shooting and when the smoke cleared he had 5 very fine 4-point bucks to clean.

Don first learned to ride a horse by riding behind his father. Some time later he was allow to borrow Grandpa's Old Peggy. She was a beautiful mare and could pace very fast and smooth. She was always hard to catchy but she liked grain so Don would 'bait' her into the corral with grain and then catch her. Grandpa's saddle was heavy and hard to get up on such a tall horse, so the granary steps were used as leverage.

Note: Charles Robert Dalton's saddle is a cherished family heirloom and is to be passed from generation to generation. At the present time (1996) it is in the possession of Donald C. Whittaker.

As soon as the North Pasture (60 acres--2000 No. 800 E.) would come alive with new grass and singing birds in the spring, Grandpa would ask Don to saddle his own horse (black and white Shetland pony named Blizzard) and help him drive the 30 head of yearling steers he had been feeding all winter to their summer pasture. What an experience this was!

Yearling steers are very hard to drive anywhere and especially through town with barking dogs running out into the street, yapping and causing the steers to turn back and scatter in

every direction. Blizzard would unexpectedly turn back to chase the errant steers and Don would often keep going straight on down the road.”

 

Virginia’s Mansion:
The Charles Robert Dalton home was called “The Palace” of the Queen of Circleville - looked up to and respected by all. This very special woman was truly a Queen in her home. Her home was the largest and finest home in Circleville. It was constructed about 1900-1903 with a new method of brick construction -- the inner and outer layers were laid as usual, but a wall was constructed between the two with the bricks laid side by side in the opposite direction.

Mrs. Annie Wixon, a schoolteacher before she came to Circleville, built the home. Her son, Rupert Wixoms (also a schoolteacher) came to Circleville to help her. This may explain the large front room in the house. It may have been the intentions of these two schoolteachers to have a school in the home. The room was about 24 x 36 feet -- (864 square feet) as large as a small home.

Bishop James Ephriam Peterson and his daughter Virginia, were the primary organizers of the Circleville Equitable Purchasing Agency (a local version of ZCMI). Ann Wixom became associated with their effort and was well acquainted with the young Virginia. Their friendship grew and when Mrs. Wixom became the Piute County Recorder she hired Virginia to write the records. Virginia's outstanding penmanship is in

evidence in all of the records she kept both personal and public.

Virginia also worked for Mrs. Wixom as a housekeeper. She was enchanted by the elegance of the mansion. In 1907, it was almost 8 years after her marriage to Charles R. Dalton, Virginia heard that Mrs. Wixom was going to sell her mansion. Virginia went to Charles and asked him to buy it for her. Charles went to Arthur Whittaker, a local banker, and borrowed $1,500.00. (The amount he lacked to pay cash.)

Both Virginia and Charles Robert had been raised in four-room houses and their first home (450 East 450 North) had only four small rooms. Their new home had eight rooms on the ground floor and three bedrooms and a large storage room upstairs.

Charles was gone most of the time - freighting, working with the sheep or farming. This left Virginia to manage both the inside and the outside of the home. She taught her children to work - to enjoy working. Their home was an ideal family enterprise, an example for their descendants to follow.

Charles R. and Virginia were married for about 18 years before Virginia's death. Virginia lived in and enjoyed her mansion for about 10 years. Amy lived in the home about 19 years. Amy is Martha Amy Robinson Stewart who married Charles Robert Dalton on 4, of Feb. 1919. (Read her story at the end of Charles Robert’s history.)

The year 1938 was a tragic year for the Dalton family. Charles R’s mother, Sarah Jane Wiley died on April 4, 1938. Amy S. Dalton, his wife, died on April 7, 1938. Reva Dalton Topham, his daughter, died of pneumonia after childbirth on the 11th, of Feb. 1938 at the age of 34.

After Amy's death, Charles R. went to live with his daughter, Ruby D. Whittaker. He died of pernicious anemia on the 24th of July 1938.

After Charles' death, his youngest son, Arthur W. inherited the Mansion and the 40 acres as his share of the estate. Arthur lived in the Mansion about a year before he left Circleville. He later sold the home and 40 acres to Cleon Fox for $3,000.

Sinclair and Laticia Thompson and Claudius Dotty and his wife were renting the home about 1945. They had gone on an Easter outing, leaving a roaring 'cedar chip' fire unattended. A wind came up, blowing from the southwest. Sparks from the chimney ignited the dry shingles and the whole building went up in flames. Nothing was saved since most everyone in town had gone on their Easter picnics.

Of note is that the “Cleon Fox” who owned this “Dalton” home is the brother of Edith Fox Dalton, the mother of Rodney Dalton!

 

Charles R. Dalton’s “Freighting Company”:
Teams and wagons were used to haul freight from the railhead at Marysvale to Kanab ... 126 miles of primitive dirt roads ... rocky, rough, and with deep mud holes. Charles owned some of the best horses on the freight line. His horses always had shoes on and were in good shape to do a day and a half's work in one day. Charles always expected more from himself and from his horses than most of the other freighters did.

The teamsters would purchase the merchandise in Marysvale and 'peddle' it to customers, stores and people along the way. His children looked forward to seeing what he would bring back home to them. It was sometimes merchandise that he wasn't able to sell that he thought his family could use.

Charles' brother, Wiley Dalton, freighted with him most of the time. They made the round trip from Marysvale to Kanab and back in about 10 to 14 days. It took two teams "4 UP" to pull the heavy "iron tired" freight wagons across the river several times between the Rail Road Terminal at Marysvale and Kanab. It often took 8 horses to pull the wagons through the snowdrifts and drifts of sand. They had learned the trick of driving “16 UP” from their father.

Charles R. also hauled lumber from the sawmills in Cottonwood and Oak Basin and City Creek to the mining camps in Milford, Utah. Trucking with teams ended about 1930 when motorized trucks were put into service. Charles did not buy a truck to continue his trucking business.

The story of the Charles Robert Dalton family farming operation:

Charles Robert Dalton’s ranching enterprise is really the story of Circleville.

He was born in 1873 and learned young how to manage the farm and ranch, and Charles R. worked up until the time he died in 1939. His was a "pioneering experience". When Charles R. first started his farming he had a team of horses, a wagon and a plow. Other horse-powered equipment was acquired over the 40 years he ran his farm.

The Charles R. Dalton Family Enterprises were financed with the money he made from his freighting business. The farming and ranching operations were added, as funds became available for expansion.

Work on the farm was never done. It went from sunup to sundown, or from 'can see' to 'can't see', and then a coal oil lantern was used for night irrigation. It was no wonder that the other boys developed other interests and left Delbert and Charles R. to do most of the farming.

Delbert learned to do everything 'on the run'. The hay was hauled to the barn on a 'high gallop', to some it seemed like a "run-a-way". No one could match Delbert's pace. The following is typical of a 'farming scene' on the Dalton Farm. Arthur was riding the "Old White Mare" on the derrick to hoist the hay into the barn, but he wasn't moving fast enough to suite Delbert. Delbert said "Gally Darn, Art, I could turn her loose and shout at her and do it faster." Arthur replied "O.K., you shout at her" and he left Delbert to himself.

Charles R. and his family raised chickens and pigs, but they were mostly used by his family and were not usually for sale. The dairy cow provided some spending money. Milk was sold for 16 cents a gallon, butter for 25 cents a pound, eggs were 20 cents a dozen and pork was sold for 3 cents per pound.

The ranching and farming operation consisted of about 1000 acres with 6 separate irrigated fieldstone wet pasture, one dry pasture and 30 square miles of Range rights.

Range rights - 25 square miles in Kingston Canyon, Rocky Ford, Lost Creek, Horse Valley, Kessler Ranch, Panguitch Bench (2,500 sheep grazed about 2 months in each area and then were moved to the next)

Charles and Wiley Dalton purchased the Kessler Ranch in 1913 as a layover station on the freight line to Kanab. The ranch had an excellent water right. Delbert, age 15 and Elwood, age 13 become the farmers. They grew barley, oats and alfalfa for the horses. Reva, age 10 and Ruby, were their cooks. There were all kinds of spooky stories told about weird noises and ghosts to add to the "Lore" of the ranch.

Other freighters on the route to Kanab would find a stable for their horses and lodging at the Kessler Ranch. The story was told about whenever the wind blew. Old Mr. Kessler

could be heard playing his violin. One night about midnight he started to play real loud and a freighter packed up and moved out in the middle of the night. The next morning it was discovered that the barn door was making the noise as it went back and forth in the wind.

The Ranch House was destroyed in an earthquake. A spring (used for water for the house) is located in the canyon on the Northwest corner of the property.

 

The day the “Hatch Town Dam” broke:
The people of Circleville were at a wedding dance for Heber Wiley, on 18 May 1914 when word was received by telephone that the water from the Hatch Town Dam was headed their way.

Charles and Wiley Dalton immediately got on their horses and rode up through Horse Valley to the Kessler Ranch (twelve miles up Circleville Canyon, that they had purchased in 1913) to open the gates and get their cattle out. .

As they were rounding up the cattle, they could hear the roar of the flood as it was getting closer and closer. They decided to try to outrun the flood down the canyon so they could get back to Circleville to make sure their families were safe.

Their horses were so tired that they would slow down to catch a breath, but the sound and smell of the raging floodwaters gave them new life and they sped on through the night. The loud 'snap' each time a strand of barbed wire was broken filled them with terror and new life. As Charles headed for the Kessler Ranch, Virginia headed for home (350 South 100 W.) and calmly put everything of value on the kitchen table, hoping that the flood waters would not get that high. She then harnessed Old Croppy to the buggy and drove west up to the flat to await the rushing waters.

The floodwaters didn't arrive in Circleville until early the next morning. The people had escaped to the higher ground on the West Flat as they expected their homes and farms to be washed away.

They first heard the terrifying roar and then saw the tumbling wall of water carrying homes, livestock trees, fences, rocks and debris. Lois Whittaker watched as her 'setting' hens and chicks drowned and floated away. The major destruction was to homes in the canyon and homes and farms on the south end of Circleville. As the waters spread and slowed they 'planted' strands of barbed wire all over the valley. It took years to get it all cleaned up. Property damage was high, but no lives were lost.

The Hatch Town Dam was located one mile Southeast of Hatchtown, Utah. It was an earthen fill dam built around the turn of the century. There had been heavy storms during the winter and the heavy runoff caused leaking and saturation around the shut-off gate.

There was not much warning as the dam collapsed. The town of Circleville did not have

funds to rebuild the dam and subsequently lost the rights to the water to the Delta Water Company downstream.

Charles Robert grew up herding sheep for his father. When he started his own herd he purchased purebred Romboulet sheep from his sister, Sarah Dalton Nelson's husband who resided in Ephriam. His herd was about 2,500 head. The sheep required constant care. The herd was kept at the Kessler Ranch in Circleville Canyon and on the Panguitch Bench in the winter where they foraged on brush and ate some hay. They also purchased cottonseed cake from Phoenix for the sheep.

In the early spring they drove the sheep from Panguitch and Circleville Canyon to Kingston Canyon for their spring range. They moved through Rocky Ford and spent most of the summer in Lost Creek and Horse Valley.

In the spring of 1918 the weather had warmed up early and ewes were lambing so they decided to get the shearing done early. A few days later a blizzard hit Horse Valley where the sheep were being herded. (A blizzard drives sheep crazy and they scatter in all directions.)

Delbert was sent to the herd to help gather the straying and freezing sheep. In his own words: "By golly, damn, if I tied three sheep to a tree and went after others, when I came back the first three would be gone. I believe if I have to herd sheep I will do it on the other side of life where the grass is always green." Most of the herd was lost in the blizzard, with many of the newly shorn ewes and newborn lambs dying from exposure.

The mules, Smokey, Lindsey and Jerry, were used at the sheep herd by Elwood, the herder, and Arthur the camp tender According to Arthur they were small, quick and lively, but you could never trust them. They could and would kick you, or bite you, and then throw you and the camp all over the flat. Jerry was larger and he was used to carry all the heavy loads.

One time Arthur was returning to the camp from getting supplies in Circleville when Jerry got tired. He stopped on a steep hill, yanked the lead rope free and rolled down the hill, breaking the eggs and jam and spilling them into the oats. Eva's cake and bread that she was sending to her husband Elwood, was smashed with the egg/oats mess.

The sheep were sold to Douglas Q. Cannon in 1935 just after the Great Depression. The money may have been used to purchase Ken's store and to expand the merchandise. It was referred to as Ken's Store. After Ken drowned in 1951, Delbert and Ruby ran the store.

Of note is that Rodney Dalton’s father, Garth Carrell Dalton worked for Douglas Q. Cannon at the time Charles Robert Dalton sold these sheep. It is not known if Garth Dalton herded these sheep.

 

Martha Amy Robinson Stewart Dalton:
The second wife of Charles Robert Dalton.

Martha Amy Robinson was born 26 December 1875 in Pinto, Washington County Utah. Her parents were Elizabeth Wooton and Richard Robinson. She was her father's 21st child in his Polygamist family. She grew up responsible for and sewing in the large family.

During her teens, Amy was hired by her sister, Blanch Hamblin to take care of Blanche's family in Pinto. Later she moved to Salt Lake City where she worked as a seamstress for ZCMI.

Amy's first marriage was to Albert Stewart in the St. George LDS Temple. Two children were born to this union. Albert was more interested in "alcohol" than in taking care of his wife and children. Amy and Albert Stewart were divorced and the sealing was canceled.

About 1918 Amy passed through Circleville on her way from Salt Lake City. She stopped to visit her niece, Lula Dalton, who was married to Wiley Dalton, Charles Robert's younger brother. The flu epidemic was raging in Circleville and Amy was quarantined with the Dalton family. She became acquainted with Charles R. and they were married on Virginia’s birthday, 4 February 1919, in Circleville.

Charles R. and Amy were sealed in the Manti Temple during the summer of 1919. Ruby remembers that they took her with them on the trip to Manti. The roads were rough and primitive and the car had five flat tires. During the sealing Ruby was taken into the temple and shown the spiral staircase. At age 90 (1996) She can still describe the staircase in detail. The second day of their trip was spent with Charles' sister, Sarah Anderson who lived in Ephriam. The three-day trip ended with their arrival back in Circleville. This was much different than the 10-day wedding trip by wagon to Manti to marry Virginia in 1900.

Amy came into the Dalton family at a critical time. Charles had lost his wife, Virginia in December of 1917, most of his sheep herd was killed by a blizzard just after they had been sheared and had lambed, and he lost his life's savings when the Marysvale Bank closed.

Charles was a director in the Bank of Marysvale. Most of the depositors were farmers and ranchers who had suffered financial losses because of the blizzard. They made a run on the bank and it had to close. Charles lost $12 of his own in stock certificates! but because of his high integrity he repaid some of the banks losses to his friends and relatives who had trusted him when he encouraged them to invest in the bank. The family had little left to live on.

When Amy married Charles she assumed the responsibility for 10 children. These Dalton children were very headstrong and had some resentment towards someone who tried to take their mother's place. They were caught up in the Roaring 20's Rebellion that was sweeping across the country and introduced by radio.

Amy was a very strict disciplinarian. The children resented her "unreasonable" strictness. They remember that they had to have all their work done before they could go outside to play or to read a book. Arthur remembers when he was about 5-years old and Aunt Amy had told him he couldn't leave the house, with his hand on the door knob he said "Well, I can open the door and my feet are my own and I will go when I please."

Ruby remember one time that they had to finish moping the kitchen floor before they could go to the 4th of July parade. They were part of the Royalty and Amy had made them sew dresses to wear. Charles R. was Grand Marshall, Reva was the Goddess of Liberty and Ruby and Elva were attendants. They did get to the parade on time. In looking back in 1995, Ruby and Hazel agreed that "Aunt" Amy was not so bad after all She accepted an overwhelming challenge with 8 children and did the best she knew how to do.

Helen Barnson, one of Amy’s nieces, came to live with the family while she attended Piute High School for 4 years. Hazel remembers that Helen was a freshman when Hazel was a senior and it was about 1930.

In later life Amy was afflicted with arthritis. She tried everything to be relieved of the pain. A doctor suggested that perhaps her teeth were the problem. Amy had perfect and beautiful teeth and she had them all pulled, but it didn’t help the arthritis pain.

Amy and Charles were married about 19 years, the same length of time he was married to Virginia.

Amy died on April 7, 1938 and Charles died on the 24th of July the same year.

Sources:
Copied from the book. “The Dalton Family History Book” by Donald C. Whittaker.

Edited with added material by Rodney Dalton.

The History of Robert Elwood Dalton of Circleville, Utah: Father; Charles Robert Dalton. Grandfather; Charles Albert Dalton.

Source:
Complied from the Dalton Family History Book; by Donald C. Whittaker.

Robert Elwood Dalton was born in Circleville Utah on July 11 1901 to Charles Robert Dalton and Virginia Peterson. He tells of his birth with this story:

“I was born in a little log house on the north end of Circleville. This house had a front room and a bedroom, also a little June kitchen. It was about two miles from there to the main part of town. My father was a farmer in the early years of my life. He had been working to prepare so he would be with mother during my birth. She took sick during the night, but it was two o'clock before 1 came into the world. I have always regretted that I was born in July because I have always faced either a water turn or harvesting a hay crop on my birthday. If I had my choice I would be born in October or November but not in July. Father always used to tell me that it had cost him a very important water turn to get me into the world, and now I owed a quite a responsibility to him to help him take care of the water turns because he had missed that one to get me here.

In our days, the hay was hauled by a wagon with a large rack placed on it, this was called a haycock; two people would load hay by pitching forks of hay onto the wagon as the wagon went between two furrows of cut hay. I began to tromp hay when I was ten years old, it was my job to tromp the hay down with my feet so they could get more hay in the rack. I got along pretty well for the first two or three hours in the morning but by the time afternoon came I was tired and it was really hard for me to climb out on top of some of those piles of hay. Sometimes I would get covered up and the pile would be so high that I had to use my hands in order to get myself out from under the pile. There would be two wagons working so I had no time to rest and we would haul hay for 8 to 10 hours a day. I tromped hay so hard days that my legs ached nights so badly couldn't sleep. I remember my father coming up to my bedroom and rubbing my legs until I could get back to sleep. This surely made a boy love his father.

One day I was playing on the straw stack in our back yard and as I walked around in the straw, all at once the straw just dropped from under me and I fell down about 8 feet into a dark cavity out of sight. Imagine my surprise to find an eight-month-old calf in the same cavity, bot h of us completely surrounded by straw and hidden from all the outside world with walls of straw towering above us on all sides and over the top of us. I called for help and the older kids got a pitchfork and began opening a path for us. After much labor to dig us out we were free: the calf to join the cows and I to tell the experience to my mother."

Robert Elwood was baptized August 1, 1909 by Charles Robert Dalton, his father and confirmed the same day by James Ephraim Peterson, his grandfather. He relates, "When I was eight years old the bishop who was my grandfather gave my father permission to baptize me in the Sevier River; I was baptized by immersion in a deep hole, that was about one forth mile east of our home. Today I realize the importance of this incident, I wonder that I did not more fully appreciate it at the time.

My Father freighted from Marysvale to Kanab and he allowed me to go with him one time. The road at that time was very rough and narrow, sometimes we would have to duck our heads in order to pass through some of the bush-covered roadside that we traveled on. "Our outfit consisted of two wagons, both wagons went together so that when the horses pulled, they pulled both wagons at once and it was a four- horse team. Father drove this team with two sets of lines. There were two horses that were called leaders and they were out in front, one set of lines were fastened to them, there were two horses that were called wheelers and they were in back, the second set of lines went to these horses. Lots of times we had a sidekick, one horse that was hooked to the side of the wagon so that it could help pull the wagon, it was fastened so it went along with the rear team. When you got in a real tough place, you had to unhook the leader and unhook one of the wagons. Sometimes you would take the lead team and hook another team on ahead of the lead team and one of the men who was traveling in the outfit would take this lead team, that would make six head of horses that were hooked onto one wagon pulling across the bad spot: a wash or a bog or some place like that. That was quite an experience to see six horses and hook them onto the wagon they had left and take it across. Freighting in those days was you tried to travel between 15 and 20 miles a day, if you made the 20 miles a day the trip took 10 days.

When we got to Black Rock Canyon we had to take the horses down a deep canyon on a narrow mile long trail to get water. It looked scary to me because if you fell off the horse you would go way down into the bottom of the canyon and it was really deep. On the climb back my father told me to cling to the horses main to keep from sliding off his back. It seemed the climb out was longer than the ride down in.

When we got to Kanab Father bought me a new hat that was made of cloth starched until it looked really nice. I thought a lot of that hat. One day I was caught in a rainstorm, I was some distance from shelter, the rain was so heavy it took all the starch out of that hat and I couldn't get it to looked nice again.

In the wintertime when the snow got two or three feet deep they had bobsleds come out from Kanab and unload the fright and bobsled it into Kanab. The wagons had to plow through snow and brake it up enough to travel through it, even when it was deep enough so that the axle would plow the snow up out of the middle of the road over into where the wheels went and you could never get a wheel track established. Sometimes the snow would get to be as deep as the bed of the wagon and it was really hard to make any headway with it.

The weather had a great influence on the travel, in the summer time you make the trip in ten to twelve days and in the winter time it could take three weeks to a month to get to Kanab and back. Father, as he grew older, felt the effects of the exposure that he endured from the freight route, but this was the means of making enough money to buy a farm. During summertime our job was to shovel the ditches clear and we did it with just an ordinary shovel and muscle. We had between four and five miles of ditch to shovel every two weeks in order to keep them so we could water the farm. If the ditch needed to be cleaned you would shovel the dirt out of it. If it had alfalfa dropped over into it so the water wouldn't run, you took a shovel full of dirt and turned the alfalfa back upon to the bank and put the dirt on top of it to hold it there.

One of the saddest things in my life was the passing of my mother when I was 16 years old. When Arthur, the youngest son was born, she bled to death during the night. Father came and woke me up to go for Olive Norton who was a midwife. When I got back I was released from my errand and I went up to bed. I didn't know that mother had died until I got up that next morning. Most of my heart died with my mother. It was years and years before I really felt like I could go on and face life alone because I missed her so much. She was my ideal. She was really the one who gave me encouragement when things got tough, she gave me counsel and guidance. I never will be able to fully replace her and I am looking forward to a time when we will be together again. The rest of that school year I had to stay home and take care of my three-year-old sister for father, so I was a year longer getting out of grade school.

Before I got out of grade school father raised a good crop of oats on the farm we called the Knight's Place. He took the oats to the Alunite Mill and sold two loads of it for enough money to buy three hundred head of old ewes that started father in the sheep business. I went out on the f I at to herd them that fall until school started and later I became the herder for that group of sheep for about seven years. I had to eat breakfast before it was light and had supper after dark, sleep time came only after that.

Whenever I could get hold of a book I would just let the world go by, I wouldn't even feel-- sometimes I wouldn't even get my work done unless someone came and told me I had to leave the book and go do the chores. I always had just so many chores, and if I didn't do them before dark I had to do them after dark.

One time Elva had a Christmas story as an assignment and she could get a prize for the best story in her class. I was out with the sheep herd, I wrote that Christmas story for Elva and it was good enough for the prize. I was proud of that because I was writing at the sheep hard and compared with students that were in school.

I wrote another story that was entitled "The Sintantal Rock". The senior class at Snow school was studying and writing the short story, and the school said that anyone who was going to school could enter the contest for the best short story. I decided to try. The plot of the story was the early settlers of Circleville had their horses stolen by the Indians. The Indians had taken the horses west of Circleville but the horses were captured from the Indians by the people of Beaver and kept there during the winter. In the spring the farmers needed the horses and sent a young man over to get them. When he was returning with the horses he came through a group of people who were on their way to California. These people were short of horses so they shot the young man, fastened a log chain to him and threw him in the river. Then they took the horses and went on to California. The story was entirely made up from the evidence on a certain rock in Circleville Canyon where the two letters CA are written and I named the man Carrol Aston. The plot and the way the story was written was marked good enough that I got third place. The crux of the thing was that it was an oral story, we were to stand up before the student body of Snow College in Ephraim, a group of three hundred students, before whom I shook so hard I couldn't even make my voice understood until I got a third of the way through the story. It was 1919 before I could go to high school and I had to go to Ephraim for school. I felt that this was a good time to buy a C Melody saxophone that I paid $169.00 to Sears Roebuck and Company to get. It took the voice part in the song and I loved that saxophone. It had a case I could carry it in and when I went with the sheep I had a wooden box made that would fold over and enclose the saxophone in its case and the music I wanted to carry in side with a little music stand; that made it so I could carry it on a pack horse and in the winter I would put the box under the bed in the sheep wagon.

I was on Panguitch Bench one night playing that saxophone and two fellows who were herding sheep about half a mile away heard me playing. They came down and had me play tunes for quite a while, they enjoyed it and so did I. That Saxophone gave me the opportunity to learn to read music and to sing. While I was in Snow I was also in the Glee Club as well as the band.

In September of 1923 1 worked building roads in Red Canyon to earn money to go to school in Salt Lake City, I drove a team and hauled gravel and dirt onto the road with a dump wagon. I stayed at work until the Saturday night and thought I could start walking from the place where we camped and someone would pick me up to give me a ride home. I walked about two miles and some boys from Panguitch gave me a ride to Panguitch about 7 miles. Then I started walking from Panguitch; it was just getting dark and the more I walked the more tired I got and the more sure I was that someone would pick me up soon. There wasn't a car that passed me going from Panguitch to Circleville or one coming from Circleville to Panguitch. So I remember how many times I had to step in order to measure that thirty miles from Panquitch to Circleville.

The year I went to Salt Lake to school I worked at the Lafayette School doing janitor work for- four to five hours each day for $15.00 a month. That left me little time to study and complete my lessons but they give me a graduation certificate when the year was over. I had such a struggle in going to school that winter I decided I would get my education by correspondence.

I had saved enough money to buy a used bicycle and Monday morning just as it came light I rode it with the clothes I stood up in and headed for Provo 40 miles away. When I reached Provo I recalled how tired I was when I had walked into Circleville that September, so I went to the Railroad Station and asked what a ticket would be on the train to Marysvale; then I asked "Will you take my bicycle along so I can have it when I get there." They said they would and I gave them the last penny I had and rode the train to Marysvale. From Marysvale I was able to recover my bicycle and began the 24-mile ride to Circleville that night. I rode my bike about 65 miles that day. The next day I went to work with the sheep and took correspondence courses and studied on my own. I went to high school in three years: I took one year as a correspondence year and went two years to Snow and one year to the LDS Collage in Salt Lake- that gave me my certificate from high school.

I was through high school and went to work with the sheep in 1924, I had decided that when I came home I would work with the. sheep until Eva Norton had graduated from high school in 1926. She graduated in May of 1926 and we were married June 16, 1926 in the Manti Temple. I was with the sheep at the time at the Kesler Ranch and father came to stay with the sheep so Eva's father and mother could take us to the temple in their car. We spent three days at the temple doing work for the dead and then I stayed with Eva's folks that night and the next morning I went back to the sheep herd so we could take the sheep to the forest reserve. In two weeks Eva came to be my camp tender for the summer.

My father made arrangements in 1925 to buy a forty-three and a half acre farm from James Gass. I bought the land for $3,000.00 which was about $75.00 an acre. I had my farm half paid for in 1930 when I quit the sheep and had to get a Federal Loan on the farm so I could pay for it in a small annual payment, it took me nineteen years to pay for the other half of the farm and the last half cost me $6,000.00 with the interest paid. The reason I quit working with the sheep was that the depression came in 1929: we couldn't sell our lambs f or more than $.05 a pound and t hat wasn't enough to pay the expenses of running the sheep, the wool went down to where you' couldn't make the expenses. I couldn't make any money with the sheep and when I quit the sheep I didn't have any income, so I started to farm with no machinery or even a good team of horses; the first few years were really rough, the depression lasted until 1935.

I was building the home on the farm in October of 1927 when James L. Whittaker came over and told me to be to meeting. I told him I would come as soon as I could get there, when I got to the meeting it was already in session but he asked me to come up to the stand. When the meeting had progressed far enough he said to me "now stand up and tell them what you think about becoming my first counselor". That was the first time I knew that he wanted me to be his first counselor and it was quite a shock to me, I didn't know what I did think about being his first counselor but I told them I was willing to accept the position. I served in that capacity for about 17 years at different times because when I was with the sheep I had to be released until I was back and available. During that time I learned a lot about serving as a counselor to a Bishop.

In my life there has been a great many inventions that have been an advantage to people. When I was born we had a well to draw water from. We had a kerosene lantern that could be hung up in a certain place and if you could get your work within that place you had light; that left us hoping to get our work done before dark. I was grateful when we got where we had a battery light on our hats that gave us light where we could see because I seemed to have a water turn every night and sometimes it was all night long. The automobile is a wonderful thing, the airplane, electricity and the many blessings that it brings into our home just to name a few. I think that all we have to do when we get discouraged is sit down for a few minutes and count our blessings, we have so many of them.

I think the values and beliefs that are of greatest importance to me is my testimony of the truthfulness of the gospel. I can find many, many times when the Lord has blessed me with blessings that I really might not have been worthy of at the time I received them, but he has come and delivered me in a lot of places where it would have been impossible for me to have done the things that needed to be done and in the best way. He has at many times helped me to get through the circumstances I was caught in and preserved my life. In times of trouble I have always felt that the help of the Lord was available to me, if I knew how and if I would go about securing it for my well being.

In my early life I desired to have a testimony of the truthfulness of the gospel. I believed the gospel was true but I really hadn't gained a testimony so that I knew it was true. By study and faith, and by trying to live the principles of the gospel, I did obtain a witness from the Holy Ghost that the gospel was true and I have a burning testimony of the truthfulness it.

There were some miraculous things that happened to me as I engaged in trapping and other things while making a living. One time I was trapping while I was with the sheep and in the area where I was trapping there was a really steep ridge. I was trying to cross the ridge to go to a different part of the trap line one day when the horse lost her footing and rolled down the hill. As she fell she was going to pass me going down hill and I could see a tree a short distance from where I first fell; I knew that if the horse rolled over me it would be t he end of me, so I dodged as quick as I could back behind the tree. When she hit the tree she just swayed that tree. If she had hit me, I know I would never have got up and walked away. I was sure glad when she could get up and I could get up and walk away from that place. I didn't climb back on her. I led her across the rest of that slope. I led her across a lot of steep slopes after that because I didn't dare ride her.

Another time, I had a marvelous experience and really felt that the Lord had saved my life. It happened when I was on Panquitch Lake fishing. One day I decided I would go out fishing, even though I had to go alone, because fishing season was soon over. I went out across from where I had my boat stationed on the south shore, to the north shore, and began fishing. I got so interested in fishing that I really didn't notice that the wind had come up and it began to drift the boat with my anchor down and I realized that I was in trouble. So I got ready to come back to where I had left my truck without really realizing just how rough the water was. But if I was going to get my boat back to the shore I had left, I had to go clear a cross the lake with the wind blowing those waves so high that there was a time when the front of my boat would be high on the waves and then there was the time when the back of my boat would be high out of the waves and the motor would just 'whoeeer'. The waves were actually so high that I would be up on the ridge, then down in the hallow; then up on the ridge, then down in a hallow. I had about a quarter of a mile to go under those circumstances and I knew that if the motor failed or I lost control so that I couldn't go, the waves would take me up and bounce me down and back, and I would be able to dig myself out of a watery grave. I traveled through the waves for almost a half a mile before I could get to the shore. I was scared and was very thankful when I hit the shore because I had quite a bit of water in my boat. But as soon as I hit the shore the next wave that came in from the lake, filled the boat with water, and I had all my equipment to dig out of the water. I was mighty glad I didn't have to dig me out of the water because within two minutes after I had been wrecked in that kind of turbulent area I would have been hard to find. I now was about a quarter of a mile from where I had to get the things in the boat to my truck so I could come home, so I had to carry the fishing equipment, as much as I could, a trip at a time, to get it to my truck. It took me a big part of an hour to get my fishing equipment down to my truck, but I left the boat where it had come to the shore. The next time I went up, I dipped the water out of the boat and moved it back down so I could get my motor back on to it from were I had to park my truck because I couldn't park my truck where I had left the boat. I felt like the Lord had really preserved my life in getting me back to the shore and safely home that day.

Another faith promoting experience happened to me in 1983. I remember I had worked in the store all day long. I was really tired. It was December, the night was cold, so I put on my coveralls and went to saw wood out in the back yard. Really I never did know exactly what did happen, but somehow I lost my footing and fell. As I fall, I struck on a piece of 3 x l2 inch board that was frozen in the ground. Striking the board with the force that I did broke my pelvis bone. As soon as I realized that I had a broken bone and wasn't going to be able to walk from the place that I had fallen, I began calling to Eva. She was in the front room with the TV on but she came out onto the porch. I knew she had come onto the porch so I called out as loud as I could call, but I hadn't made her hear. "The weather that day was down below freezing and when I fall on the ground, the ground was frozen, I could tell I was going to get really cold, so I kept calling just as loud as I could

for someone to come and help me. After it started to become dark my guardian angel told me that we had to move; we had to get to where we could get some help or freeze to death. I turned over on the right side because I knew I would have to scoot myself with my arms and with my right leg about twenty steps to a place where I could make somebody hear that I had to have help and get to the hospital. Really that was the only thing I can remember until I was where I needed to be. Now just how I was able to scoot myself that far I don't know, but I had help because I never realized how I got there. I believe that an unseen power helped me, because the thought that I had to move was the last thought that I had before I realized that I was where I needed to be. Then I realized that I was far enough and I began calling again. It was about twenty minutes before Eva came out of the kitchen door and then she could hear me and she came to me. I told her I had a broken leg and that I would have to go to the hospital. She went back in and called Clifford. He and Eva got the ambulance. I was so cold by the time I got help that they were afraid I would be frozen. When I got to the Panguitch hospital they took an x-ray and found that I had a broken pelvis bone and they weren't equipped to take care of me as they should. So they sent me and the x-ray picture to Cedar City Hospital where Dr. Mcnaught, a bone specialist, was able to set the pelvis bone and put a steel plate in there to hold it together until it mended. This accident happened to me toward night and it was three o'clock the next day before they were able to operate and put the plate in my pelvis bone

That night when they pulled off my boots they said my legs were just frozen like blocks of ice. They didn't stop to take my coveralls off in the normal way, they just cut one side of them completely off, the side that had the broken pelvis bone on it. Then they took the rest of my clothing off and I remember I was conscious enough to hear the doctor say "Well, we are going to place you in traction" and he pulled my foot down into a straight position placing it so it would have to stay in that position. They must have given me quite a lot of pain medicine because I don't remember that night from that time on, but I do remember the next morning when I became conscious and I felt quite disturbed that they weren't going to do anything about setting the bone until that afternoon. About three o'clock that afternoon they did get to work on setting the bone; both Stanley and Eva were at the hospital. They felt like it would be a miracle if I didn't have pneumonia. So they started to doctor me to protect me against pneumonia, to test me for signs of pneumonia all during the period that I was in the hospital. I didn't have pneumonia and I was surely pleased that I didn't have any frozen toes because they were so cold when they took off those boots. I was fortunate enough to get over the broken hip and get well again. But I think it was the blessing of the Lord that in all of those cases helped me to be able to accomplish what had to be done.

Another thing that was quite marvelous to me was a shoulder situation. I had recovered from the broken pelvis bone and was getting along just fine when one Sunday I went to church I knew that my shoulder was swollen quite badly. When I tried to lift Eva's coat upon her shoulders, a pain struck me that was just so terrible that I couldn't continue to stay at the meetings, so we came home and went to the Panguitch hospital to see what the doctor could tell me about the shoulder.

He took a x-ray of it and that showed there was not a shoulder bone reaching from the point above the elbow of my arm up to my shoulder and fitting into the socket, so he sent me to Cedar City to Doctor McNaught, who operated the next day. When I got so I could talk to him I ask him what he found when he got into the shoulder. "Well," he said, "it was just a big hole. There wasn't any bone connecting the arm to the shoulder." Gristle had formed in there and that made it possible for me to use the arm, the doctors were astonished that this had happened. I think that was another blessing from the Lord.

"I believe that what happened to cause this condition to happen was while we were growing potatoes. Stanley and I had gone up to the pit about a mile from home to get potatoes and bring them back to feed to the cows. We had a pair of scales up there that we had been weighing the potatoes on and we wanted to bring them home so we could use them. We loaded them on top of the trailer load of potatoes that was being pulled behind a tractor. Stanley was driving the tractor about fifteen miles an hour over rough road when the bolt that connected the trailer to the tractor jolted out of the tractor bar and the trailer tongue dropped to the ground. When it hit the ground it stopped dead still, the scales and I went right out over the trailer, the scales hit the ground and I hit the scales with my shoulder. I knew I had been bruised quite badly because it was about three weeks before I could really use that arm again. I guess it was at that time when I got my shoulder broken and the bone was shattered so bad that it would never heal up. I felt that it was just badly bruised and I couldn't raise my arm after that above my head, but I could work pretty good with it if I didn't try to raise it. I guess you sometimes have got to go and see the doctor to know if you are really broken and not just bruised. I never felt that I needed to consult the doctor, that I would heal up in a few days and be going again so why bother a doctor about getting hurt, I just got over it. Sometimes it would have been better maybe if I would have gone and seen the doctor.

I know the gospel is true, I know it by the inspiration and guidance of the Holy Ghost. And, as Moroni said, all may gain a testimony of the gospel by sincerely reading the Book of Mormon and asking our Father in Heaven if that book is true. I have a testimony that that book is true, that the church is established, and that we have the gospel in its fullness in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, of which we are members in our day. And I leave this testimony in the name of Jesus Christ. Amen.

Robert Elwood Dalton served a two-week Stake Mission in 1927. He was City Councilman and City Treasurer in Circleville in 1933-34. He was counselor in the M.I.A. for a time, secretary for the Young Mans' Mutual in 1918, superintendent of the Sunday School in 1927 and First Counselor to Bishop James L. Whittaker from 1927 to 1929, set apart again as counselor in 1932 and held this office 16 years, being released in 1946. He taught 1st, Intermediate class in Sunday School 1927-29, 2nd Intermediate class 1932-38 and taught Missionary Training Class 1936-1952. He was elected a member of the Board of Education of the Piute School District 9 Dec. 1950-55. He was set apart as Bishop of the Circleville Ward Aug. 19, 1951 and released Jan 30, 1955. He taught classes in the Circleville Ward Organizations a total of 58 years and had many of his students tell him that they learned the gospel and learned to love the gospel while they were attending his classes. He enjoyed visiting with and helping the people who came to Stan's Merc. for the years he worked there, he loved to read the good books that were his Joy, right up to his death on August 26, 1995. His love for his family was shown in action and caring right up to his death. His greatest hope was that all his posterity would love the gospel and serve the Savior enduring to the end as he has set an example for them with his life and love. He is missed and thought of by those who remember his commitment to his family, God, and the church, and community.”

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The DALTON Family in Piute County, Utah:
I have put the following information into this chapter because it tells many stories about our Dalton family in Circleville, Piute, County, Utah. Remember that all the Dalton's from Circleville are descendants of Charles Wakeman and his first two wives, Julietta Bowen & Elizabeth Ann Heskett Allred.

The source was complied and submitted by Ardis E. Parshall, Historical Directory of Piute County, Utah from an un-published work in process. Ardis has collected stories and history about the people living in Piute County Utah for years. She was kind enough to send to me the following information about our Dalton family in Piute County. Her sources were mainly the local newspapers of the times. I have edited her original work and have added parents of the persons listed.

 

Ada Ann Dalton:
Daughter of Charles Albert Dalton and Sarah Jane Wiley. Born 1 November 1893, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Lester Poulsen, 17 September 1919. Blessed by James L. Ruby; baptized 4 October 1902, by George Holyoak; Confirmed 5 Octobr 1902 by Laban D. Morrill; Removed to Ephraim, 15 June 1924.

20 January 1949:
Ephraim, Utah.

Ada Ann Dalton Poulson, 55, wife of Lester F. Poulson, died at her home here Tuesday afternoon, apparently of a heart attack. She was found slumped in a corner of the kitchen by Mr. Poulson when he entered the home after returning from helping a neighbor feed livestock. Other neighbors said they had seen Mrs. Poulson at home no more than ten minutes earlier. She still had her coat and rubbers on when found by Mr. Poulson. Mrs. Poulson was born in Circleville, Piute County, Nov. 1, 1893, a daughter of Charles and Sarah Wiley Dalton. She attended Snow College at Ephraim for two years and was librarian of the institution for one year. She was married to Mr. Poulson in the Manti Temple, Sept. 17, 1919, and had lived in Ephraim since. A member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints she was active in Relief Society and other Church work, in the American Legion auxiliary, and in the American Red Cross, serving as local chairman for the latter organization for the past few years. Surviving, besides her husband, are three daughters, Mrs. Eldon V. Boswell, Nephi; Mrs. Thomas R. Muir, Salt Lake City, and Miss Ruth Poulson, Ephraim; one son, Capt. Ernest L. Poulson, former ROTC instructor at the University of Utah and now with the Air Force at Randolph Field, Texas; one brother, Roy Dalton, California; three sisters, Mrs. Sarah Olsen and Mrs. Edna Peterson, Salt Lake City and Mrs. Carolina Wiltshire, Circleville, and two grandchildren. Funeral services for Mrs. Poulson will be conducted Friday at 1:30 p.m. in the Ephraim West Ward Chapel by Bishop Glen J. Nielson. Burial will be in Ephraim City Cemetery. Friends may call at the family home here Thursday evening and Friday prior to services.

Source:
Deseret News: 20 January 1949.

 

Afton Garneta Dalton:
Daughter of Martin Carroll Dalton, Jr., and Ivy Veater. Born 12 August 1913, at Circleville, Piute Co. Utah. Married William Shelby Thomas, 11 August 1932. Baptized by Charles R. Dalton, and confirmed by John R. Norton, 11 September 1921.

Children:
Anita LaRue Thomas, born 18 January 1934, in Circleville, Piute, Utah.

James Valan Thomas, born 26 May 1936, in Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Afton Philip Thomas, born 20 December 1937, in Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Amadalene Karol Thomas, born 27 February 1940, in Circleville, Piute, Utah.

1920: Living in Circleville; attended school in 1919; can read and write.

8 August 1930:
A number of young people of Circleville went to Puffer Lake to spend a few days. Among those going were the Misses Carnetta and Arda Dalton, Pauline Bettenson, Una Peterson and Athenese Chamberlin and the Messrs Weldon Simkins.

Source:
Piute County News: 8 August 1930.

 

Alma Dalton:
Son of Morgan P. Dalton and Ida Marilla Dalley. Born 14 June 1920, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Betty – Died 31 January 1958, at Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. Buried at Delta, Millard, Utah. Blessed 5 December 1920, by John M. Bucklar. Baptized by Vernon R. Johnson and confirmed by James L. Whittaker, 9 September 1928.

3 March 1941:
Enlisted in Army, 204th Field Artillery Battalion; corporal; Discharged 1 November 1945, at Fort Douglas, Salt Lake, Utah.

31 January 1958:
Widower living at Delta, Millard, Utah.

21 November 1941:
The boys from Circleville who were on parade with 100,000 soldiers in Los Angeles on Armistice day were Clark Davis, Rollo Fullmer, Clarence Nay, David Kocherhans, LeGrande Nay, Arnold Nay, Guy Norton, Cecil Dalton and Alma Dalton. They also visited with some of the Circleville people who are employed in that city.

 

DELTA – UTAH:
Alma Dalton, 37, died in a Salt Lake hospital Thursday, 11 a.m. An inquest is set for Saturday. Born June 6, 1920, Circleville, Piute County, to Morgan P. and Ida Dalley Dalton. Married Betty Jo Lee Feb. 8, 1946, Delta. Veteran World War II; member, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Survivors: widow; four sons, daughters, Danny Lee, Douglas Earl, Jesse Lee, Rocky Allan, Darcia Ann, Delta; mother, Lark; three brothers, five sisters, Raymond, Salt Lake City; Earl, Bishop, Calif.; Leon, Circleville; Mrs. Louise Fullerton, Pioche, Nev.; Mrs. Marie Chidester, Las Vegas, Nev.; Mrs. Iola Poole, Richfield; Mrs. Myrtle Prisby, Calif.; Mrs. Sylvia Hopkins, Lark. Funeral announced from Nickle Mortuary, Delta.

Source:
Piute County News: 21 November 1941, 26 December 1941

Deseret News:
1 February 1958.

Ambrose Carlos Dalton:
Son of Phillip D. Dalton and Emily Rasmussen. Born 8 August 1917, at Salina, Sevier, Utah. Married Esther Morgan, 28 May 1946; sealed 13 April 1963.

Children:
Jacqueline Dalton:

Rickey C. Dalton:

1920: Living in Marysvale; born in Utah; son of Philip D. Dalton. Blessed 2 September 1917, by G. Lorentzen; Received from Salina 2nd Ward, 7 July 1918.

1920: Living in Marysvale.

28 September 1945: Junction-Utah.

Sgt. Ambrose Dalton, son of Mr. and Mrs. Phil Dalton, arrived Monday of this week. He has spent three years and four months overseas, most of the time in Italy. He is going to stay here and work on the farm with his parents. He is the first Junction boy to receive his discharge from the service.

10 September 1949:
Notes on town elections: Junction: 2-year trustee: Ambrose Dalton, 56, and Ray Peterson, 63.

Sources:
Gravestone of Esther Morgan Dalton in Junction Hill Cemetery.

Piute County News:
28 September 1945.

Richfield Reaper:
10 September 1949.

 

Anna Rowena Dalton:
Daughter of Myron R. Dalton and Alice M. Hall. Born 22 March 1907, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Wells Mellor. Baptized 6 July 1918, by John Westwood; confirmed 7 July 1918, by Erastus Anderson.

 

Arla Dalton:
Daughter of R. Elwood Dalton and Eva Norton. Born 13 November 1928, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Blessed 3 March 1929 by R. Elwood Dalton. Baptized 8 July 1937 and confirmed 5 September 1937 by R. Elwood Dalton.

19 December 1941:

Arla Dalton and Martha Simkins had a half-day off last Thursday to visit other grades, because they had their work prepared 100 per cent during the week.

Source:
Piute County News, 19 December 1941.

 

Arlene Dalton:
10 April 1942:
Mr. and Mrs. Chell Dalton had as guests on Easter their daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Alma Hansen, and daughters, Arlene and Joyce, of Corinne.

Source:
Piute County News, 10 April 1942.

 

Arlo Doyle Dalton:
Born 5 February 1900, in Utah. Married Verda Long.

20 April 1916: Fought fire at Bertelsen home/store in Marysvale.

15 June 1916: Miss Etta Long entertained at a lawn party at her home Wednesday night. The young people spent the time in dancing. Mrs. Goode Cabanne presided at the piano. Refreshments were served at 10:30. The following guests were present: Lucretia King, Susie Jacobson, Melba King, Lyle Gibbs, Theo. Petersen, Elvira Williams, Ella Petersen, Thelma Bertelsen; Grant Borg, Bryan King, Ivan Foisy, Melvin Howes, Oren Gibbs, Ray Stocks, Arlo Dalton, Byron Dalton, Orville King, Seymour Black, Mr. Ence, Mr. Hansen, Mr. Jorgensen, Mr. and Mrs. Eayrs and son Jack.

15 March 1917: Joe Lay, Arlo Dalton and Linn Bertlesen were celebrating with firewater Sunday last. After overloading they were met and congratulated by marshal Haws, who then introduced them to justice of the peace G.T. Eayrs, who believed they had too much money for three good boys and fined them $15 or 15 days for their bad behavior.

14 February 1918: Joined Marysvale branch of Red Cross.

19 September 1918: Patriotic Men Make Response to Call. Responding to the call of the Nation for recruits for the army, the loyal citizens of Piute county between the ages of 18 and 45, both inclusive, flocked to the registration places last Thursday and when the totals had been counted in the several registration offices throughout the county, 297 names had been recorded. The county fell short just forty names, according to the number allotted. Piute county had been set aside to furnish 337, but only 297 men were registered. The officers have announced that a close canvas will be made and the county thoroughly “combed” for any slacker and should any be found they will be made to suffer the penalty as prescribed for failing to register. Reports from all the registration offices throughout the county are to the effect that the work was done expeditiously and that there was not the least semblance of disorder. The day had been declared holiday and all business houses were closed for the occasion. The following is a list of the men registered: Marysvale-... Arlo Doyle Dalton.

21 November 1918: Officers Seize Liquor. M.D. Gilbourne and Nelson Johnson were placed under arrest last Thursday night and charged with unlawfully having intoxicating liquor on their premises. The arrest was made by Marshal Spencer Gibbs and Orlo Dalton and in the raid the officers secured a quart bottle and one point bottle of whiskey at Gilbourne’s place, while a quart was seized at the Johnson place. The accused men were given a preliminary hearing Friday and both entered pleas of not guilty. Bonds ere placed at $200 which, was furnished.

6 March 1919: Bertelsen is Found Guilty. The town of Marysvale won a “round” in the prosecution of “bootlegging” cases last Friday when Lane Bertelsen, charged with illicit dealing in ‘booze” was given a fine of $75 and court costs. The case was heard before Justice R.H. Knapp, who came here to sit in the case. The town was represented y Olof Mickelsen of Richfield, while W.E. White fought the case for the defense. In the complaint Bertelsen was charged with selling to A.J. Cherry a quantity of whiskey, the latter paying the defendant the sum of $95 for the liquor. The transaction occurred on the 28th day of November last. Attorneys for the defendant asked for a jury trial and afer the first panel had been exhausted by challenges, the second was necessary. A.J. Cherry, Marshal Gibbs and Arlo Dalton were the principal witnesses for the prosecution, while Bertelsen, the defendant was the only one testifying in his behalf. Cherry, the principal witness for the prosecution, gave a straightforward account of his dealings in the purchase of the liquor. He stated on the stand that he had approached Bertelsen, and after securing the liquor, gave two checks in payment. One of the checks was for $40 and the other for $55. After securing the whiskey, Cherry took the liquor to his home, where it was after located by the officers. After hearing the evidence the jury retired and soon returned with a verdict of “guilty.” Judge Knapp in passing sentence, stated he cared not to work a hardship on a man so young and just starting out in life, and accordingly assessed a fine of $75, together with the cost of the suit. Attorney White gave notice that he would appeal the case to the District court for the defendant. “Bootlegging and the unlawful dealing in whiskey in Marysvale has got to stop,” said one of the members of the town board at the conclusion of the trial. “We have secured a conviction in the Bertelsen case and we will now see what can be done in the other two that are pending against Johnson and Gilbourne. The cases will be brought to an early trial and fought to a finish. We will stop the traffic if we must go to the extreme.” Of Marysvale; appears on list of “persons whose registration cards are in the possession of” Piute County Draft Board, WWI-era.

1920: Living in Marysvale. Gold Miner. Can read and write. Both parents born in Utah.

14 April 1925: Of Marysvale: Joined Modern Woodmen of America; named wife as beneficiary.

Sources:         
Piute Chieftain: 20 April 1916, 15 June 1916, 15 March 1917, 14 February 1918, 19 September 1918, 21 November 1918, 6 March 1919.

Arthur W. Dalton:
Son of Charles R. Dalton and Virginia Peterson. Born 17 December 1917, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Florence Gardner 15 June 1939. Blessed 5 May 1918, by Benjamin Cameron, Jr. Baptized by Ambrose Shurtz and confirmed by Charles R. Dalton 22 August 1926. Ordained deacon 17 December 1929 by Charles R. Dalton; elder 7 June 1939 by Bp. James L. Whittaker.

1920: Living at Circleville.

28 May 1936:

Piute High School Graduates Listed. Following is a list of the graduates from the Piute County high school at Circleville and the Marysvale high school at Marysvale: Piute County high school -- Thos. Alto Mathew, Daphne Sprague, Beth Smith, Wm. Darrell Luke, George J. Westwood, Carling D. Allen, Adrene Gleave, Raeola Ackerman, Dixie Ann Thompson, Rollo Fullmer, Freda Fauntel Gilger, Jane Wiltshire, Athene Whittaker, Van A. Wiley, Arthur W. Dalton, and Niels Martensen.

25 April 1941:
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Dalton entertained the members of the Younger club at their home Saturday evening.

21 November 1941:
Arthur Dalton was in town on business last week. He is now working in Salt Lake City.

Sources:
Piute County News: 25 April 1941, 21 November 1941.

Richfield Reaper:
28 May 1936.

Beryle Enid Dalton:

Daughter of Phillip D. Dalton and Emily Rasmussen; born 16 October 1913, at Salina, Sevier, Utah. Blessed 7 December 1913.

1920: Living in Marysvale; attended school in 1919.

Byron R. Dalton:
Son of Myron Roundy Dalton and Alice M. Hall. Born 20 June 1897.

20 April 1916: Fought fire at Bertelsen home/store in Marysvale.

15 June 1916:
Miss Etta Long entertained at a lawn party at her home Wednesday night. The young people spent the time in dancing. Mrs. Goode Cabanne presided at the piano. Refreshments were served at 10:30. The following guests were present: Lucretia King, Susie Jacobson, Melba King, Lyle Gibbs, Theo. Petersen, Elvira Williams, Ella Petersen, Thelma Bertelsen; Grant Borg, Bryan King, Ivan Foisy, Melvin Howes, Oren Gibbs, Ray Stocks, Arlo Dalton, Byron Dalton, Orville King, Seymour Black, Mr. Ence, Mr. Hansen, Mr. Jorgensen, Mr. and Mrs. Eayrs and son Jack.

14 February 1918:
Joined Marysvale branch of Red Cross. Of Marysvale; appears on list of “persons whose registration cards are in the possession of” Piute County Draft Board, WW1-era.

22 April 1918:
Of Marysvale: Joined Modern Woodmen of America; named mother as beneficiary.

26 October 1933:
Mr. and Mrs. Byron Dalton of San Diego, California are here to spend several weeks with relatives and friends.

Sources:
Piute Chieftain: 20 April 1916, 15 June 1916, 14 February 1918       

Richfield Reaper:
26 October 1933.

Caroline Dalton:
Daughter of Charles Albert Dalton and Sarah Jane Wiley. Born 10 June 1884, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married George Wiltshire, 15 December 1909.

Died 16 January 1972. Buried at Circleville; stone reads: “Mother”.

Blessed November 1884. Baptized 30 August 1892, by James L. Ruby; confirmed 1 September 1892, by James L. Ruby.

12 December 1902:
Christmas Program to be Rendered at Circleville, Dec. 24-25, 1902. People to congregate from 1:30 to 2 p.m. at Dalton’s hall, Dec. 24th. Christmas carol by the choir. Prayer by the Chaplain. Music by Lorin Fullmer and company. Grand display of Christmas Tree and distribution of presents. In the evening, at 8 o’clock sharp, a grand ball will be given for adults. An excellent supper to be served at 11 p.m. Dancing to be interspersed by toasts given by J.H. Fullmer, Willis Johnson, Jos. Johnson, Sarah A. Morrill, Jos. Meeks, Ellen L. Fullmer, Sarah A. Dalton and Leon Johnson. Presents for tree will be received from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Second Day’s Program. December 25. Meeting will begin at 10 a.m. sharp. Singing, Christmas greeting, by the choir. Prayer, by the Chaplain. Singing, by the choir Stump speech, by Jos. Neilson. Instrumental music, by Leona Johnson. Song, by Jos. Johnson. Why Christmas is a holiday, by Willis Johnson. Song, by Ina Fullmer and company. Recitation, by Mrs. Mary Horton. Music, by the Harmonica band. Recitation, by Almira Knight. Song, by Lulu Parker and sisters. Recitation, by Susie Meeks. Male Quartette, by G.M. Beebe, M.D. Morgan and others. A Round, by Messrs. Fullmer, Neilson and Meeks. Singing, by the Choir. Benediction, by the Chaplain. Children’s dance in the afternoon beginning at 2 p.m., prompt, and closing at 4:30. Master of ceremonies, Jos. Johnson. Chaplain, J.E. Peterson. Committee on Decoration Sarah A. Morrill, Chairman. Mary Horton, Minnie Wiltshire, Susie Meeks, Walter Farnsworth, Caroline Dalton, Jose Bettenson, Annie Wiley, Willard Hayward, Dwight Fullmer, Jos. Meeks and Roy Dalton. Distributing Committee. Ina Fullmer, Sarah Dalton, Ethel Wiley, Ellen Simpkins, Maggie Petersen and Emma Lambson. Dancing Committee. Jos. Johnson and J.H. Fullmer, J.H. Fullmer, floor-manager. Finance Committe. Jos. Johnson, J.H. Fullmer, J.C. Whittaker, Geo. Corton and M.D. Morgan. Coffee Committe. Nellie Dalton, Mozetta Whittaker, Mrs. H.D. Wiley and Hanna Whittaker. Committee on Tables. H.D. Wiley, Jos. Bettenson, T.W. Smith, Ed Fullmer, Chas A. Dalton, Sarah Morrill, Mrs. Annie Parker, Mrs. Minnie Wiltshire, Ellen Meeks, Ellen Lambson, Lila Louth[?], Sarah A. Dalton and Lizzie Bettenson. 1920: Living in Circleville. Can read and write.

4 June 1964:
Mrs. Wiltshire to Note 80th Date on Sunday. Circleville -- Mrs. Caroline Wiltshire will celebrate her 80th birthday anniversary at an open house Sunday from 2 to 7 p.m. at her home. Mrs. Grace Watkin, Richfield and Mrs. Jane Westwood, Circleville, her daughters will be hostesses. Mrs. Wiltshire was born June 10, 1884, in Circleville a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Dalton. She was married to George Wiltshire, Dec. 15, 1969. He died Feb. 9, 1957. She has been an active member of the LDS Church and has served in many capacities including the Sunday School, Relief Society and has served as Relief Society visiting teacher for 55 years. She is the mother of four children, Oscar and Reed Wiltshire and Mrs. Jane Westwood, all of Circleville and Mrs. Howard (Grace) Watkin, Richfield. She has 17 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren.

20 January 1972:
Caroline Dalton Wiltshire, 87, Circleville, died Jan. 16 in Circleville of natural causes. She was born June 10, 1884, in Circleville, to Charles Albert and Sarah Jane Wiley Dalton. She was married to George Wiltshire Dc. 15, 1909, in Circleville; later solemnized in the St. George LDS Temple. He died Feb. 9, 1957. She was active in the LDS Church, having served as secretary of the Sunday School for 14 years; was a counselor in the Young Women’s Mutual Improvement Assn. and was a Relief Society visiting teacher for 45 years.

Survivors: Sons, daughters, George Oscar, Charles Reed, Mrs. George (Jane) Westwood, all Circleville; Mrs. C. Howard (Grace) Watkin, Richfield; 17 grandchildren; 34 great-grandchildren; sister, Mrs. Sarah J. Olsen, Salt Lake City.

Funeral services were Wednesday in the Circleville ward chapel with Bishop Raymond Whittaker, officiating. Oscar Wiltshire offered the family prayer prior to the services and Grace Reynolds played prelude music. Dan Westwood offered the invocation. Speakers were Donald C. Whittaker, Scott B. Smith and Bishop Whittaker. Music included selection by the Circleville Ward Choir; organ solo by Colleen Gass; vocal duet, William and Howard Horton and vocal solo, Burns Black. C. Howard Watkin offered the benediction. Burial was in the Circleville Cemetery by Neal S. Magleby and Sons Mortuary, Richfield, where Stanley Dalton offered the dedicatory prayer. Pallbearers were Roger Westwood, Dahl Westwood, Gerald McIntosh, Evan Wiltshire, George Morgan and Allen Wiltshire.

Sources:

Gravestone.

Piute Free Lance:
12 December 1902.

Carrell Garth Dalton:
Son of Martin Carrell Dalton, Jr. and Ivy Veater. Born 19 September 1917, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Edith Juanita Fox 1935. Blessed 10 March 1918 by Benjamin Cameron, Jr. Baptized by Robert Elwood Dalton and confirmed by Bp. Henry Sudweeks, 14 August 1927. Ordained deacon 17 December 1929 by Allen C. Reynolds; priesthood, 9 March 1941 by Vern R. Johnson.

Charles Albert Dalton:
Son of Charles W. Dalton and Julietta Brown. Born 26 August 1849, at Devil’s Gate, Wyoming. Married Sarah Jane Wiley, 9 October 1870. Children:

Charles Robert Dalton, born 22 November 1873, at Beaver, Beaver, Utah.

Edna Dalton, born, 26 July 1876, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Wiley Dalton, born, 20 February 1876, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

James Burk Dalton, born 1 September 1881.

Caroline Dalton, born 10 June 1884, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Leroy Dalton, born 18 September 1887, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Sarah Julia Dalton, born 5 March 1889, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Ada Ann Dalton, born 1 November 1893, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Died 15 October 1936. Buried at Circleville (elaborately carved stone).

Baptized 14 February 1858, by Charles Hogg; confirmed 14 February 1858 by Simon C. Dalton. Ordained an elder, 25 January 1904, by James E. Peterson. Temple sealing 10 January 1912.

9 October 1870:
Married at Beaver, ceremony performed by Robert Wiley. 1880: Conveying mail.

17 January 1882:
“Having learned that Charles Dalton would not bring the mail hereon account of the bad crossing of the river ... I got a horse & rode over there, but found he had not come yet.” – H.E. Desaules.

14 June 1892:
Appointed appraiser of estate of Howard M. Tanner.

1900:
Mine owner at Circleville.

12 December 1902:
Christmas Program to be Rendered at Circleville, Dec. 24-25th 1902 People to congregate from 1:30 to 2 pm. at Dalton’s hall, Dec. 24th. Christmas carol by the choir. Prayer by the Chaplain. Music by Lorin Fullmer and company. Grand display of Christmas Tree and distribution of presents. In the evening, at 8 o’clock sharp, a grand ball will be given for adults. An excellent supper to be served at 11 pm. Dancing to be interspersed by toasts given by J.H. Fullmer, Willis Johnson, Jos. Johnson, Sarah A. Morrill, Jos. Meeks, Ellen L. Fullmer, Sarah A. Dalton and Leon Johnson. Presents for tree will be received from 9 a.m. to 1 pm. Second Day’s Program.

25 December 1902:
Meeting will begin at 10 a.m. sharp. Singing, Christmas greeting, by the choir. Prayer, by the Chaplain. Singing, by the choir Stump speech, by Jos. Neilson. Instrumental music, by Leona Johnson. Song, by Jos. Johnson. Why Christmas is a holiday, by Willis Johnson. Song, by Ina Fullmer and company. Recitation, by Mrs. Mary Horton. Music, by the Harmonica band. Recitation, by Almira Knight. Song, by Lulu Parker and sisters. Recitation, by Susie Meeks. Male Quartette, by G.M. Beebe, M.D. Morgan and others. A Round, by Messrs. Fullmer, Neilson and Meeks. Singing, by the Choir. Benediction, by the Chaplain. Children’s dance in the afternoon beginning at 2 p.m., prompt, and closing at 4:30. Master of ceremonies, Jos. Johnson. Chaplain, J.E. Peterson. Committee on Decoration Sarah A. Morrill, Chairman. Mary Horton, Minnie Wiltshire, Susie Meeks, Walter Farnsworth, Caroline Dalton, Jose Bettenson, Annie Wiley, Willard Hayward, Dwight Fullmer, Jos. Meeks and Roy Dalton. Distributing Committee. Ina Fullmer, Sarah Dalton, Ethel Wiley, Ellen Simpkins, Maggie etersen and Emma Lambson. Dancing Committee. Jos. Johnson and J.H. Fullmer, J.H. Fullmer, floor-manager. Finance Committe. Jos. Johnson, J.H. Fullmer, J.C. Whittaker, Geo. Corton and M.D. Morgan. Coffee Committe. Nellie Dalton, Mozetta Whittaker, Mrs. H.D. Wiley and Hanna Whittaker. Committee on Tables. H.D. Wiley, Jos. Bettenson, T.W. Smith, Ed Fullmer, Chas A. Dalton, Sarah Morrill, Mrs. Annie Parker, Mrs. Minnie Wiltshire, Ellen Meeks, Ellen Lambson, Lila Louth[?], Sarah A. Dalton and Lizzie Bettenson.

5 August 1903:
Signed petition asking County Commission to consolidate Circleville and Lost Creek School Districts, claiming that neither district “is able to build a school house of sufficient capacity to accommodate all the children of their respective districts, nor to grade the scholars according to their merits, resulting in the holding back of children that ought to be advanced, for their slower going class mates.”

1903-04: Farming 54 acres (value: $600), at Circleville. Mine owner.

30 March 1907: C.A. Dalton, of Circleville, was a Marysvale visitor last week.

1908-09: Mine owner at Circleville; farming 52 acres (value: $600), in Circleville.

1911-12: Farming 68 acres (value: $780), at Circleville.

14 November 1918: Subscribed for bonds “of the fourth issue” (World War I war bonds), at Circleville.

1918-19: Farming 32 acres (value: $2,240), at Circleville.

1920: Farmer, living in Circleville; can read and write.

1920-21: Farming 32 acres (value: $1640), at Circleville.

Sources:
Gravestone.

Piute Courant:
30 March 1907.

Piute Chieftain:
14 November 1918.

 

Charles Delbert Dalton:
Son of Charles Robert Dalton and Virginia Peterson. Born 6 November 1899, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Ella Rhea Savage, 17 June 1925. Died 1986. Buried at Circleville. Blessed 4 February 1900, by James E. Peterson; baptized by Charles Robert Dalton and confirmed by James E. Peterson, 1 August 1909; ordained deacon, 19 January 1913, by John W. Reynolds; ordained teacher, 26 March 1917, by Charles Robert Dalton; ordained priest, 24 March 1919, by Peter D. Jensen; ordained seventy, 30 August 1921, by Rulon S. Wells; received from Antimony, 5 December 1926; Removed to Antimony, 25 November 1925.

19 September 1918:
Patriotic Men Make Response to Call. Responding to the call of the Nation for recruits for the army, the loyal citizens of Piute county between the ages of 18 and 45, both inclusive, flocked to the registration places last Thursday and when the totals had been counted in the several registration offices throughout the county, 297 names had been recorded. The county fell short just forty names, according to the number allotted. Piute county had been set aside to furnish 337, but only 297 men were registered. The officers have announced that a close canvas will be made and the county thoroughly “combed” for any slacker and should any be found they will be made to suffer the penalty as prescribed for failing to register. Reports from all the registration offices throughout the county are to the effect that the work was done expeditiously and that there was not the least semblance of disorder. The day had been declared holiday and all business houses were closed for the occasion. The following is a list of the men registered: Circleville... Delbert Charles Dalton, Of Circleville; appears on list of “persons whose registration cards are in the possession of” Piute County Draft Board, WWI-era.

1920:
Living at Circleville. Farm helper, home farm. Can read and write.

1 September 1931:
Of Circleville; signed articles of incorporation of Circleville Growers, Inc., organized “to engage in any activity in connection with the picking, gathering, harvesting, receiving, assembling, handling, grading, standardizing, packing, processing, transporting, storing, financing, advertising, selling, marketing and/or distribution of any fruits and/or vegetables delivered by its members or any of the products manufactured therefrom and in connection with the purchase or use by and/or for its members of supplies, machinery and/or equipment.”

25 April 1941:
Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Dalton are rejoicing over the arrival of a baby girl, born Monday, April 21.

Sources:
Gravestone.

Piute Chieftain:
19 September 1918.

Piute County News:
25 April 1941.

 

Charles Nordell Dalton:
Son of Charles Delbert Dalton and Ella Rhea Savage. Born 29 September 1926, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 28 November 1926 by Bp. David A. Smith. Baptized by Joseph Delbert Betenson and confirmed by John M. Bucklar, 21 July 1935. Ordained deacon, 10 September 1939 by Delbert C. Dalton; teacher 18 January 1942 by Clair B. Crane.

18 December 1958: Nordell Dalton of Circleville and Burns Black of Antimony were the speakers in church last Sunday evening.

Source:
Richfield Reaper: 18 December 1958.

 

Chella Elaine Dalton:
13 February 1942:

Mr. and Mrs. Byron Hansen entertained at a family dinner at their home on Thursday evening of last week. The occasion was in honor of the first birthday anniversary of their daughter, Peggy. Guests included Mr. and Mrs. Chell Dalton and daughters, Chella and LaRue and Mr. and Mrs. Ervin Mellor.

Source:
Piute County News: 13 February 1942.

 

Chloris Dalton:
25 February 1965: Circleville.

Funeral services for Mrs. Chloris Dalton Davis, 45, who died Saturday in Cedar City following a heart attack, were held Tuesday in the Circleville Ward chapel with Bishop Stanley Dalton conducting. Speakers at the services included C.B. Crane, Scott B. Smith and Bishop Dalton. Carl G. Tippitts offered the family prayer. The invocation was given by James C. Applegate and the benediction by Arthur Gottfredson. Music included prelude and postlude, Mrs. Grace Reynolds; vocal quartet, Carling and Merrill Allen, Mrs. Charlene Dalton and Mrs. Brenda Robinson; vocal solo, Bill Horton; vocal trio, Mrs. Brenda Robinson, Mrs. Charlene Dalton and Mrs. Colleen Simkins. Burial was in the Circleville Cemetery by Winterrose Southern Utah Mortuary, Cedar City, where Edward Davis offered the dedicatory prayer. Pallbearers were Grant Dalton, Ward Dalton, Clark Dalton, Clark Davis, Robert Davis and Lee Fenton. Mrs. Davis was born Nov. 28, 1919 in Circleville, to Wiley and Lula Brinkerhoff Dalton. She was married to Marlo Edward Davis Feb. 28, 1938 in Junction, later solemnized in the Manti LDS Temple. Survivors include her husband, Cedar City; four daughters, Mrs. Karl (Marie) Tippitts, Frankfurt, N.Y.; Mrs. Earl (Joan) Rice, Salt Lake City; Mrs. Stanley (Jean) Anderson, Las Vegas, Nev.; Betty, Cedar City; two grandchildren; three brothers, one sister, Ward, Grant, Clark, all Circleville; Mrs. Laverda Fenton, Pleasant Grove.

Source:
Richfield Reaper: 25 February 1965.

 

Clarence Edgar Dalton:
Son of Edward Dalton and Delilah Clark. Born about 1880, at Parowan, Iron, Utah. Married Hannah Orton about 1906, at Parowan, Iron, Utah.

1920: Living at Marysvale. Teamster for potash mine. Can read and write.

 

Dale McDonald Dalton:
Son of George Franklin Dalton and Alice M. Hall. Born 1 October 1916, at Marysvale, Piute, Utah. Married Grace Julander, 22 January 1936. Died 23 March 1938, at Deer Trail Mine near Marysvale, Piute, Utah. Blessed 4 March 1917, by Allen Cameron; baptized 31 August 1925, by Ivan L. Foisy; confirmed 6 September 1925, by Fred N. Swalberg. Ordained a deacon, 1 September 1929, by Wilford Hansen; ordained a teacher, 26 April 1931, by Edgar A. Henrie; ordained a priest, 15 November 1936, by Fred N. Swalberg; ordained an elder, 27 December 1936, by Ivan L. Foisy. Temple sealing 20 January 1937.

1920: Living in Marysvale.

1938: Mine laborer; lifetime resident of Utah.

24 March 1938:
Deer Trail Mine Disaster Claims Lives of Two Marysvale Men.

Four Others Escape Death; Rescue Workers Imperiled. Gaseous fumes from a smouldering fire in the Deer Trail mine near Marysvale Wednesday took the lives of two men, Bert Glen Lund, 36, and Dale McDonald Dalton, 21, both of Marysvale, and imperiled the lives of four other miners working nearby and a rescue squad of 11 other “leasers”. One of the miners rescued, Curt Lund of Marysvale, was carried from the danger zone unconscious but after treatment was able to relate something of the disaster Wednesday night. Other miners trapped were Morris Burr of Marysvale and Gail Taylor and Golden Mecham of Central. The men were trapped about 3500 feet back in the mine in a winze 200 feet from the end of the drift. Mr. Burr was able to crawl on his hands and knees in a half-conscious condition until he reached fresh air. He met Dean Trevort, en route to the working area after having eaten lunch, and the two made their way out and spread the alarm. Aided by others they were able to assist Mr. Taylor and Mr. Mecham in escaping immediately. While some of the men worked in relays to bring the two Lund brothers and Mr. Dalton from the danger zone, others summoned help of other independent miners, and Rex Taylor hurried to Marysvale and returned with a group headed by John Pearson, mine superintendent; Hoyt Morrill sheriff; Armond Luke, state highway patrolman, and Dr. K.L Jenkins. In the meantime the rescue crews, working under perilous conditions as a result of gas, had succeeded in bringing the three trapped men to a level in clear air, 1500 feet form the danger zone. All three were unconscious, but Curt Lund soon started to revive. As Mr. Pearson started the mine compressor to make certain the air remained clear, Dr. Jenkins started his hopeless task of administering artificial respiration. Mr. Pearson estimated that the men died in mid-afternoon, approximately three and one-half hours after they were stricken between 11 a.m. and noon. A pulmotor, brought from Salt Lake to Richfield by airplane, was taken from the airport here by F.G. Martinez, but reached the scene too late. A hysterical crowd of friends and relatives gathered at the mine entrance were not aware of the death of the men until late afternoon. Approximately 20 to 25 men work as leasers in the gold and silver mine, which has not been operated by the Deer Trail company of Salt Lake for years. Three mine inspectors will work with the mine superintendent in an effort to determine the definite cause of the disaster. It was believed by some miners the fire had been started Tuesday by flames from an open carbide lamp igniting gas from rotting timbers, and had smoldered in the timber. Mr. Dalton, who was born and raised in Marysvale, is survived by his widow, Mrs. Grace Julander Dalton; his mother, Mrs. Alice M. Dalton; a brother, Wells Dalton; a sister, Mrs. Georgia Kennedy, all of Marysvale; five half-sisters and three half-brothers. Mr. Lund, who had lived in Marysvale since 1904, is survived by his widow, Mrs. Mary Wilson Lund; his mother, Mrs. Joseph E. Dennis; four daughters, Delma, Bernet, Leora and Rosalie Lund; a son, Glen Lund; a brother, Curt Lund, all of Marysvale; a sister, Gwen Hyatt of Kenilworth; three half-brothers and three half-sisters, among them Mrs. Utahna Farnsworth of Richfield.

31 March 1938:
Inquest Held in Mine Tragedy As officers abandoned plans to investigate the gas-filled Deer Trail mine until conditions are made safe, Piute county officials called an inquest to determine officially the cause of death of two miners, Bert Glen Lund, 36, and Dale McDonald Dalton, 21, both of Marysvale, who met their death in the mine March 23. A coroner’s jury decided Saturday death was caused by carbon monoxide gas. Decision of the inquest, which was conducted by Piute county authorities, agreed with an earlier report of E.A. Hodges, state mine inspector, who gave the same explanation of the death of the two men, after they were trapped 3500 feet from the mine entrance by a smoldering fire. Sheriff Hoyt Morrill of Junction and County Attorney Wallace Thompson of Antimony, conducted the inquest before Justice of the Peace V.A. Taylor of Marysvale. Witnesses included Dr. K.L. Jenkins, Pressley Wilson, Leon Gibbs, Frank Munson and John Pearson, superintendent of the mine, which has been ordered closed “for the present” by Mr. Hodges. Members of the jury included William Outzen, Art Shelton and Scotty Scott. Double funeral services for the two accident victims were held Sunday afternoon in the Marysvale ward. So large was the attendance that the church would not hold the crowd assembled and many stood outside during the services. Speakers were James R. Henrie, John E. Oscarson, Mayor of Marysvale, and Fred A. Swalberg, bishop of the Marysvale ward. Invocation was offered by Ivan Foisy and benediction pronounced by Ted Hansen, both of Marysvale. Music was furnished by the Marysvale ward choir; Art Prows and Clark Johnson of Salina, Byron Anderson of Marysvale and Mrs. Ina Chamberlain of Circleville, vocal soloists, and Judd Haycock of Circleville, violinist. Mr. Lund was buried in Thompsonville cemetery, two miles south of Marysvale, and Mr. Dalton was buried in Monroe City cemetery.

14 April 1938:
Following is a copy of an open letter addressed by Michael Barnett of the Utah Lead company at Marysvale to the Associated Civic Clubs of Southern Utah: The recent catastrophe at one of the mines near Marysvale, which resulted in the death of two men, was traced to carbon monoxide gas. The heroic efforts of physician and laymen to resuscitate these men proved futile, and these efforts were considerably handicapped by lack of essential equipment. Whether or not the results might have been different, had the lifesaving mechanical equipment have been available earlier, is a mooted question, but to all who were present, (among which number was your Mr. Carr, and I think he will bear me out), that question was dominant and will remain dominant, because it cannot at this day be answered. Through the aid extended by your organization, equipment was rushed to you from Salt Lake City, and your Mr. Martines in turn rushed it to Marysvale. Every effort was made to get the help here, but Salt Lake City is a long way off, and many, many hours had elapsed before it reached Marysvale for application. The civic aid your organization has secured, and the many plans on behalf of the general welfare of the communities in southern Utah that you have sponsored, calls for no reminder; the monuments of the accomplished results are everywhere evident. Thus I feel that a move to secure for this district essential life-saving equipment, to be lodged at Richfield, which is more or less centrally located, should be sponsored by you, and a program gotten under way to raise the necessary money to purchase the same, so that there will remain with us the moral satisfaction of knowing, should a similar accident occur, that we have at least exhausted all human efforts, and made use of all available mechanical devices, to save a life. In the name of the two men who died, Burt Lund and Dale Dalton, let us give or rather let us be prepared to give the other fellow that “hundredth chance” which they could not get. Let us “be prepared” against an emergency. Can’t we get started and create a fund as a memorial to two men, so that the lesson of their death shall not have been in vain?

Yours truly, MICHAEL BARNETT

Source:
Richfield Reaper: 24 March 1938, 31 March 1938, 14 April 1938.

 

Darla Dean Dalton:
Daughter of Morgan Leon Dalton and Ida LaVern Barlow. Born 6 August 1934, at Junction, Piute, Utah. Blessed 7 October 1934 by Barlow T. Luke. Baptized 6 December 1942 by Thomas D.A. Smith; confirmed 13 December 1942 by Jay W. Applegate

 

David Dalton:
S
on of Keith D. Dalton and Mardene C. - Born 18 May 1958. Died 27 June 1958. Buried at Circleville; stone reads: “Our baby”.

28 July 1958:
Circleville, Piute County – David Dalton, month-old son of Keith D. and Mardene Godfrey Dalton, Circleville, died Friday 9:30 a.m. at his residence here of natural causes. Born May 18, 1959, Panguitch. Survivors: parents, a sister, Julie Ann; grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Dalton, Circleville; Mr. and Mrs. Ervil Godfrey, Clarkston, Box Elder County. Funeral Monday 2 p.m., Circleville Ward chapel, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Friends call at the chapel prior to services. Burial Circleville Cemetery.

Sources:
Gravestone.

Deseret News:
28 July 1958.

 

Delos Robert Dalton:
Son of R. Elwood Dalton and Eva Norton. Born 7 August 1935, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 1 September 1935 by R. Elwood Dalton.

25 December 1958:
Delos Dalton has returned from the California Mission where he has served for the past two years. He and his family have spent the past few days visiting with friends and relatives in Circleville and Parowan.

Source:
Richfield Reaper: 25 December 1958.

 

Duane Philip Dalton:
Son of Philip D. Dalton and Emelia Rasmussen. Born 11 January 1925, at Salina, Sevier, Utah. Blessed 1 February 1925 by Ivan L. Foisy Baptized 1 April 1933 by Ray Fulkerson; confirmed 2 April 1933 by Harry McCarroll. Ordained teacher, 7 July 1940 by Philip D. Dalton; priest, 11 January 1942 by Philip D. Dalton; elder, 22 November 1942 by Philip D. Dalton. Received from Santa Ana, California, 8 February 1942.

22 May 1942: Of Junction; graduated from Piute High School Friday of last week.

 

Earl Dalton:
Son of Morgan P. Dalton and Ida M. Dalley; born 27 February 1916, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Ruth Collings, 30 September 1937 (civil ceremony); divorced, 4 October 1937. Blessed 14 June 1916, by Benjamin Cameron, Jr.; baptized by Robert Elwood Dalton and confirmed by Ambrose Shurtz, 14 August 1927; ordained deacon, 21 January 1930, by Bishop James L. Whittaker

1920: Living in Circleville.
A number of Piute County men were wounded in the war. One of them were Circleville seaman Earl Dalton, who was stationed on the U. S. S. Helena when enemy fire sunk it. With head and leg injuries, he spent six hours at sea in a life raft before being rescued.

29 September 1960:
Former Resident of Circleville Dies In California. A former Circleville resident, Earl Dalton, died Sept. 18 in a Bishop, Calif. hospital with funeral services held there Sept. 22. Mr. Dalton, 44, was born in Circleville February 6, 1916, a son of Morgan P. and Ida Dalley Dalton. Survivors include his widow, Iva Imaly Dalton; two daughters, Donna and Kathleen Dalton, all Bishop; two brothers, Raymond Dalton, Salt Lake City and Leon Dalton, Circleville; five sisters, Mrs. Louise Fullerton, Pioche, Nev.; Mrs. Iola Poole, Richfield; Mrs. Marie lamb, Las Vegas, Nev.; Mrs. Myrtle Prisby, Maywood, Cal.; Mrs. Sylvia Hopkins, Lark and his mother, Lark.

Source:
Richfield Reaper: 29 September 1960.

 

Edna Dalton:
2 December 1899:

Circleville - Peterson-Dalton Marriage ... Circleville, Piute Co., Nov. 30.--Yesterday at 3 o’clock p.m. Alvin Peterson and Edna Dalton, two popular young people of this place, were joined in wedlock at the residence of the bride’s parents. A large gathering of relatives and friends were present to wish the happy couple a pleasant and prosperous journey through life. Last night they gave a grand ball and the people turned out en mass.

18 February 1960:
Graveside Services Held Friday for Edna D. Peterson – Circleville.

Graveside funeral services were held Friday afternoon in Circleville for Mrs. Edna Dalton Peterson, 83, who died Feb. 9 in a Salt Lake City hospital of natural causes. J.L. Whittaker gave a short story of her life at the services with a solo being given by Mrs. Charlene Dalton and the grave dedicated by Reed Wiltshire. Funeral services were held earlier that day in Salt Lake City. Mrs. Peterson was born July 26, 1876 in Circleville, a daughter of Charles A. and Sarah Jane Wiley Dalton. She was married to Ephraim A. Peterson Nov. 28, 1899 in Circleville, later solemnized in the Manti LDS Temple. She was an active member of the LDS Church. Survivors include the following children: Warren D., Elbert, Mrs. Hazel Russell, all of Salt Lake City; Mrs. Loretta Parkinson, Sandy; 14 grandchildren; 15 great-grandchildren; a brother, LeRoy Dalton, Long Beach, Calif.; sisters, Mrs. Caroline Wiltshire, Circleville; Mrs. Sarah Olsen, Salt Lake City.

Sources:
Richfield Reaper: 18 February 1960 - Deseret News: 2 December 1899.

 

Edna Pearl Dalton:
Daughter of Earl Dalton and Ruth Collins. Born 20 December 1937, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 2 July 1939 by John M. Bucklar. Removed to Springville, Utah, 12 December 1940.

 

Edward Dalton:
16 April 1903: Several Young Couples Are Taken Out of Matrimonial Market. Last Monday two of Annabella’s couples went to Manti to be married. They were William Daniels and Miss Pearl Gauchat and Ed. Dalton and Miss Matilda Olsen

 

Effie Pearl Dalton:
Daughter of Charles Wakeman Dalton and Elizabeth Heskett Allred. Born 17 February 1875, at Wild Cat Canyon, Beaver, Utah. Died 27 August 1946, at Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah.

1880: Living in Circle Valley Precinct.

28 August 1897:
Miss Pearl Dalton of Circleville, returned from Provo where she has been attending teacher’s institute last Saturday night and spent the Sabbath with her sister, Mrs. Alma Straw. Miss Dalton is a teacher and will act as tutor of the east Circleville school this year.

11 September 1897:
An examination of the teachers of Piute County was held at Circleville last Monday and Tuesday. The public annual examination for to teach in the county. Those who underwent the ordeal were, Emma Peterson, Miss Christensen, Alice Hayes, Willis Johnson, Josephine King, Matilda Thompson, and Pearl Dalton.

Source:
Piute Pioneer: 28 August 1897, 11 September 1897.

 

Eleanor Dalton:
Daughter of Orson Allred Dalton and Franz Harriet Wiltshire. Born 29 July 1872, at Beaver, Beaver, Utah. Married William W. Ruby 29 July 1892, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Died 15 April 1960.

1880:
Living in Circle Valley.

29 July 1892:
Of Circleville. Wedding performed by Bishop J.E. Peterson; witnesses: M.D. Morgan and Ella M. Wiley.

 

Elva Lauree Dalton:
Daughter of Charles Robert Dalton and Virginia Peterson. Born 13 July 1908, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Rexford Whittaker, 14 July 1926. Died 26 April 1980. Buried at Circleville; stone reads: “An artist who created beauty in a garden, her home, and the human heart”. Blessed 1 November 1908, by James E. Peterson; baptized by Charles R. Dalton and confirmed by Arthur M. Peterson, 22 July 1916.

1920:
Living in Circleville; attended school in 1919; can read and write.

3 August 1939:
Ira Stormes Women's Relief corps No. 6, auxiliary of the G.A.R., met Thursday at the home of Mrs. Lola Smoot of Circleville. Plans for the meting of girls of the junior corps, under the direction of Mrs. Ina Chamberlain, for the purpose of organizing a drum and bugle corps were submitted, and the charter will soon be applied for. Mrs. McKinley Morrill was initiated into the organization at the June meeting. Mrs. Earl Whittaker applied for a transfer to a Salt Lake City corps. The next meeting will be held at the home of Mrs. Anna M. Long, on August 24, at Marysvale.

20 September 1940:
Miss Betty Haycock has gone to Salt Lake City to Business college. While there she will stay with Mr. and Mrs. Earl Whittaker.

20 September 1940:
Mrs. Rex Whittaker spent a few hours with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. James L. Whittaker, Friday before leaving for New Haven, Conn., where her husband will attend Yale again this year.

21 November 1941:
Mrs. Edna Peterson, who lives in Salt Lake City, is here visiting friends and relatives. She is staying at the home of her niece, Mrs. Rex Whittaker.

 

Elvira Dalton:
Daughter of Charles Wakeman Dalton and Elizabeth Allred. Born 9 February 1865, at Chicken Creek, Juab, Utah. Married Frederick W. Day 5 June 1881, at Antimony, Garfield, Utah. Married Joseph Hyrum Morgan 6 February 1889, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Died 31 December 1951, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Buried at Circleville.

Member of Circleville Ward.

1880:
Living in Circle Valley Precinct.

29 January 1889:
Witnessed the wedding of Martin Carrel Dalton and Charlotte Ellen Whittaker, at Circleville.

30 March 1889:
Wedding ceremony performed by James Wiley, justice of the peace; witnesses: Orson A. Dalton and Fannie Dalton.

27 December 1917:
Joined Marysvale Red Cross.

14 November 1918:
Subscribed for bonds “of the fourth issue” (World War I war bonds), at Circleville.

1920:
Living at Circleville. Dressmaker, at home. Can read and write.

17 July 1931:
Mr. and Mrs. McKinley Morrill of Junction and Mrs. Elvira Morgan and Mrs. Pearl Spencer of Circleville were doing business in Richfield last Saturday. We understand McKinley, or Shirl was the lucky one in the Reaper contest and won the Chevrolet car offered for gaining new subscribers. Name found in list of schoolteachers in Piute County, “from records and memory”, from beginning to 1950.

31 December 1951:
Of Circleville. Died at home, of carcinoma of left ear, and of senility. Funeral services held 3 January 1952, at Circleville chapel, conducted by bishop.

2 January 1952:
CIRCLEVILLE, Piute County –

Funeral services for Mrs. Elvira Dalton Day Morgan, 86, native Utahn and first elementary school teacher in Circleville, will be conducted Thursday at 2 p.m. in the Circleville Ward chapel, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, by Bishop Elwood Dalton. Mrs. Morgan died Monday afternoon at the home of a daughter, Mrs. Rulon Spencer,of causes incident to age. She was born at Chicken Creek, Juab County, near Nephi, daughter of Charles Wakeman and Elizabeth Allred Dalton. She attended schools in Fillmore at that time capital of the territory of Utah, and then became the first elementary teacher in Circleville. She was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and as a young girl became personally acquainted with Brigham Young on his many trips through that area. She married Frederick W. Day in Antimony, Garfield County, on June 5, 1881. They separated in 1884 and Mrs. Morgan was later married to Joseph E. Morgan in Circleville in 1885. Mr. Morgan died in 1922. Survivors include three sons, J. Dennis, B. Darius and Alma Morgan; one daughter, Mrs. Rulon (Pearl) Spencer, all of Circleville; one half sister, Mrs. Alf Elder, Ogden; one half brother, Edward Dalton, Parowan; 15 grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren, and one great-great-grandchild. Friends may call at Mrs. Spencer’s home in Circleville Thursday from 11 a.m. until time of services. Burial will be in Circleville City Cemetery under direction of the Neal S. Magleby Mortuary.

3 January 1952:
Acquaintance of Brigham Young Dies At 86 In Circleville.

Mrs. Elvira Dalton Day Morgan, 86, died Monday at 3 p.m. at the home of a daughter, Mrs. Rulon Spencer in Circleville, of causes incident to age. She was born at Chicken Creek, Juab County, near Nephi, a daughter of Charles Wakeman and Elizabeth Allred Dalton. She attended schools in Fillmore at the time Fillmore was the state capital. She was the first elementary school teacher in Circleville. A member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, she had been active in the Young Women’s Mutual Improvement Assn. and Relief Society work. As a young girl she became a personal acquaintance of Brigham Young when her mother ran a boarding house in Brigham City where the church leader often stopped on his trips. She was married to Frederick W. Day in Antimony, Garfield County, June 5, 1881. The couple separated in 1884. On February 6, 1885, she was married to Joseph H. Morgan in Circleville. The couple spent their married life there. Mr. Morgan died March 7, 1922. Survivors include three sons and a daughter, J. Dennis, R. Darius, and Alma Morgan, and Mrs. Rulon (Pearl) Spencer, all of Circleville; a half sister, Mrs. Alf Elder, Ogden; a half brother, Edward Dalton, Parowan; 15 grandchildren, 11 great grandchildren, and one great-great-grandchild. Funeral services will be conducted today at 1 p.m. in the Circleville L.D.S. Ward Chapel by Elwood Dalton, bishop. Burial was in the Circleville Cemetery under the direction of the Neal S. Magleby Mortuary.

Sources:
Gravestone.

Piute Chieftain:
27 December 1917, 14 November 1918.

Piute County News:
17 July 1931.

Richfield Reaper:
3 January 1952.

 

Eulala E. Dalton:
Daughter of Chell Dalton and Elvira Williams. Born 28 November 1917, at Marysvale, Piute, Utah. Married Alma Hansen 28 June 1935. Blessed 10 February 1918 by Emroy Johnson. Baptized 8 August 1926 by Ivan L. Foisy; Confirmed 8 August 1926 by John W. Robinson. Removed to Corrine Ward, 5 November 1939.

1920:
Living at Marysvale.

Eulala E. Dalton Hansen passed away July 14, 1999 at the home of her daughter.

She was born November 28, 1917 in Marysvale, Utah, and was the first child of Myron Chellis Dalton and Elvira Jane Williams Dalton. At the age of 16, Mom met a tall, handsome young man from Monroe named Alma M. Hansen, and so began a beautiful courtship which culminated in their marriage on June 28, 1935 in the Manti LDS Temple. Alma and Eulala's faith in and love for each other carried them through 48 years together. They always worked side by side, whether it was doing household chores, caring for a sick child, shoeing a horse or building a barn. They lived quiet, unpretentious but productive lives full of love for the Lord and their family, devotion to each other, service to all, sacrifice, hardship, tears and much laughter. They created an incomparable legacy for their seven children, three sons-in-law, two daughters-in-law, 18 grandchildren, and 15 great-grandchildren.

Eulala was always cheerful, optimistic and practical, and was well-known for her quick wit and wonderful sense of humor. She was always busy doing something, whether cooking, canning, baking, gardening, quilting, sewing or crocheting. When someone was in need, she was always ready to provide service quietly, willingly and without fanfare. She was blessed with an unwavering and uncomplicated faith in God which led to a life of activity and service in the LDS Church. She was a member of the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers and enjoyed doing genealogical research.

Mom, we will miss your love and kindness, your quiet strength, your feistiness, and your incredible sense of humor. You have been without Dad for 16 years, and now we can rest easily and happily knowing that you are together once again. You and Dad were our guides, our rudders, and the anchor to which we all were tethered and from which we drew strength. Now, we know that we must go on without you, but your shared strength, faith, love, knowledge and wisdom will enable us to carry on. We feel honored to be able to call you our parents.

Funeral services were held Friday, July 16, 1999 at 3 p.m. at the LDS Centerville Stake Center, 951 North Main Street, Centerville, Utah. Interment, Centerville City Cemetery.

 

Eva Dean Dalton:
Daughter of Myron Challis Dalton and Elvira J. Williams. Born 6 July 1922, at Marysvale, Piute, Utah. Married Byron J. Hanson, 29 February 1940.

Children:
Peggy Hanson

Dave Hanson

Clyde Hanson

Shane Hanson

Died 23 February 1993. Buried at Marysvale. Blessed 5 November 1922, by F.C. Nickle. Baptized 3 August 1935 by F. Verl Henrie; confirmed 4 August 1935, by Ivan L. Foisy.

14 April 1955:
Rook Club members Mrs. Georgie James, Eva Deen Hansen, Flossie Blackwell, Louise Bay, Ida Dennis, Joan Burr, Jeraldine Stocks, Melva Rosequist, Marjery Dalton and Alene Cuff enjoyed dinner at the Rainbow Cafe in Richfield and then the movie Far Country last Thursday. Ferris Mellor and Carol Howes missed the fun this time.

24 January 1963:
Marysvale correspondent for Richfield Reaper.

Source:
Richfield Reaper: 14 April 1955, 24 January 1963.

 

Evelyn Jean Dalton:
Daughter of R. Elwood Dalton and Eva Norton. Born 22 July 1937, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 5 September 1937 by R. Elwood Dalton.

 

Francis Cecil Dalton:
Son of Martin Carroll Dalton, Jr. and Ivy Veater. Born 25 February 1920, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Blessed 3 October 1920 by James O. Meeks. Baptized by Lamar Mangum and confirmed by James L. Whittaker, 10 September 1933. Died January 1964, at Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah.

21 November 1941:
The boys from Circleville who were on parade with 100,000 soldiers in Los Angeles n Armistice day were Clark Davis, Rollo Fullmer, Clarence Nay, David Kocherhans, LeGrande Nay, Arnold Nay, Guy Norton, Cecil Dalton and Alma Dalton. They also visited with some of the Circleville people who are employed in that city.

28 January 1964:
France Cecil Dalton, 43, 1239 Mead Ave. (980 South), died of a heart ailment Monday, 4:30 p.m., in a Salt Lake hospital. Born Feb. 25, 1920, Circleville, Piute County, to Martin C. and Iva Veater Dalton. Married Delia Day May 12, 1946, Circleville. Veteran, World War II. Member Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Survivors: widow; son, daughters, Shane, Sharlene, Randy, all Salt Lake City; brothers, sisters, Garth C., Ogden; Taylor B., Mrs. Shelby (Garneta) Thomas, Mrs. Jay (Rhea) Mortenson, Mrs. Arthur (Syble) Edvalson, all Las Vegas, Nev.; Mrs. Merrill (Uarda) Fullmer, Phoenix, Ariz. Funeral Friday, 2 p.m., 4330 S. Redwood Rd., here friends call Thursday 7-9 p.m., Friday one hour prior to services. Burial, Redwood Memorial Estates.

Source:
Deseret News: 28 January 1964.

 

Francis Joshua Dalton:
Son of Martin Carrell Dalton and Charlotte Ellen Whittaker. Born 5 February 1902 (11:15 p.m.), at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Died 6 July 1924. Buried at Circleville.

Blessed 4 May 1902 by Jorgen P. Jensen. Baptized by James Lester Peterson and confirmed by Martin C. Dalton, 5 June 1910. Died of “accidental by Powder.”

1920:
Living at Circleville. Did not attend school during previous year; can read and write.

 

Garth Rodney Dalton:
Son of Carrell Garth Dalton and Edith Juanita Fox. Born 3 April 1938, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 3 July 1938 by James L. Whittaker.

 

Gary Dean Dalton:
Son of Delbert C. Dalton and Ella Rhea Savage. Born 5 August 1935, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 1 December 1935 by Delbert C. Dalton.

 

George Franklin Dalton:
Son of Charles Wakeman Dalton and Elizabeth Ann Heskett Allred.

Born 22 November 1856, at Cove Fort, Beaver, Utah. Married Alice M. Hall. Children:

Georgia Rose Dalton, born 18 May 1912, at Marysvale, Piute, Utah.

Dale McDonald Dalton, born 1 October 1916, at Marysvale, Piute, Utah.

Died 3 November 1920. Buried at Marysvale.

LDS church member.

2 January 1897:
Obituary. At the home of Wm. Howes Sr. last Monday night, Mr. David Giles, an old time prospector and miner, passed into the realms of the unknown, cause heart failure. Deceased was one of the fist men to strike the camp, and was active in the development of the mine for many years. He was father-in-law to Frank Dalton of Dalton mine fame. Many surviving relatives mourn his loss.

26 March 1898:
Frank Dalton is in town at present.

18 September 1903:
Geo. Romney Jr., of the Gold Vein company arrived from Salt Lake on Sunday’s train, and with G.F. Dalton who arrived Saturday evening, will arrange to get the Wedge ore down to the Dalton mill. In pursuance of that object they made a trip to Monroe on Monday.

18 September 1903:
Mgr. G.F. Dalton came down from the Wedge yesterday and reports the ore as increasing in width, and holding its own in values.

25 September 1903:
Mrs. G.F. Dalton, Miss Para Dalton, Frank and Ralph Dalton arrived from Salt Lake Friday evening and are domiciled at the Grand; Mr. Dalton took the boys for an outing to the Wedge.

25 September 1903:
Mr. G.F. Dalton will make an examination of some ground in the Horse Heaven country in a few days for outside capitalists.

14 October 1905:
Frank Dalton is conducting a campaign on the Twin Peak properties at Marysvale and reports that considerable capital is coming into his section and anticipates active development next season.

13 April 1916:
George F. Dalton is now putting the Shamrock in shape for shipping ore in the near future having made no shipments for nearly one-year. He has been developing the Piute Chief joining the Shamrock. These were the early shippers in the camp and gave shipping values from the grass roots. It shipped for several years. There has been no shipping done for a year on account of development work. The snow slides have been cleared away and shipping will start in the near future. Dalton was the locator of the Dalton mine and shipped from it in the 90's $376,000 worth of ore, to the nearest rail point, Manti and later Salina.

20 April 1916:
G.F. Dalton is still pushing the work on the Shamrock.

4 May 1916:
G.F. Dalton and family have moved to the Shamrock mine for the summer, where Mr. Dalton will take charge of the work, and push it to a point where shipments can be made, which will no doubt be soon. There is about 1,800 tons of shipping ore on the dump.

5 September 1918:
Of Marysvale; real property on delinquent tax list to be redeemed or sold on 16 December 1918.

1918-19:
Farming 1 acre (value: $175), at Circleville.

1920:
Living at Marysvale. Gold miner. Can read and write.

Sources:
Gravestone.

Piute Courant:
14 October 1905.

Piute Chieftain:
13 April 1916, 20 April 1916, 4 May 1916, 5 September 1918.

Piute Free Lance:
18 September 1903, 25 September 1903.

Piute Pioneer:
2 January 1897, 26 March 1898.

Geroge F. Dalton is listed as a owner or having shares in the following Gold Mines in the Henry Mining District, Sevier Co. Utah Records, 1883-1896:

Mine: Copper Mine - Date: 7/25/1883;

Mine: Copper Mine Extension

Mine: Emerald Mine

Mine: Copper Glance Mine

Mine: Malchite Mine

Mine: Gold Coin Mine - Date: 12/7/1884;

Mine: Silver Coin Mine - Date: 12/11/1884;

Mine: Emeral Mine - Date: 1/1/1885;

Mine: King David Mine - Date: 1/2/1885;

Mine: Copper Mine Extension

Mine: Amothist - Date: 2/16/1885;

Mine: Copper Mine - Date: 4/24/1885;

Mine: Dalton Copper - Date: 1/1/1887;

Mine: Summit Mine - Date: 1/12/1887;

Mine: Ruby Mine - Date: 1/19/1888;

Mine: Golden Rod - Date: 1/19/1888;

Mine: Dalton Mine - Date: 1/6/1890;

Mine: Dalton Mine Extension - Date: 1/26/1890;

Mine: Congress Mine No 1 - Date: 5/6/1891;

Mine: Congress Mine

Mine: Moscow Mine No 1

Mine: Moscow Mine No 2

George Franklin Dalton:

The second son of Orson Allred Dalton and Frances Harriet Wiltshire.

George F. Dalton was fairly typical of the miners who filed numerous claims in the area. He and D.T. Greenin filed on four locations in October 1882 for the Gold Reef, Mollie, Harry, and Mayflower Mines, all located up Baion Canyon about a half-mile from the falls. In February 1883 Dalton filed nine more claims in the Ohio Mining District for a series of mines he called Gold Ledge Numbers I through 9, and in, 1890 he located the Pearl, the Gold Belt, the Jones, and the Elsie Claim as well as a section called the Triangle Fraction. None of these mines were large producers, but presumably they yielded enough to keep Dalton interested and occupied for several years.

1880: Living in Circle Valley precinct.

George F. Dalton and wife Anna; Emp. at J. S. Daniels Co. Res: 2263 Van Bureun, Ogden Utah.

Source: Polk's Dictionary, Ogden Utah - 1928.

George F. Dalton and wife Anna; Meat Cutter at J. S. Daniels Co. Res: 2263 Van Buren, Ogden Utah.

Source: Polk's Dictionary, Ogden Utah - 1935.

George F. Dalton and wife Anna E; Grocer 1138 22nd St. Res: 2263 Van Buren, Ogden Utah.

Source: Polk's Dictionary, Ogden Utah - 1948.

Obituary:
2 August 1960: OGDEN UTAH.

George Franklin Dalton, 80, 2260 Van Buren Ave., died Sunday in an Ogden hospital of a heart aliment. Born Aug 1, 1879, Circleville, to Orson and Franz Wiltshire Dalton. Married Annie E. Clark, Aug 19, 1914, Salt Lake City. She died Sept. 12, 1959. Member of Ogden thirteenth Ward, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Grocery store owner-operator. Survivors: sons, daughters, Ned, Mrs. David (Bessie) Nelson, Mrs. Andrew (Ruth) Anderson, Ogden; Gordon, Salt Lake City; seven grandchildren, eight great-grandchildren. Funeral Wednesday 1 pm., Myers Mortuary, where friends call Tuesday 7-9 pm. Wednesday prior to services. Burial Ogden City Cemetery.

Source: Deseret News: 2 August 1960.

 

Georgia Rose Dalton:
Daughter of George Franklin Dalton and Alice M. Hall. Born 18 May 1912, at Marysvale, Piute, Utah. Married George Kennedy. Blessed 10 July 1912 by L.L. Jackman. Baptized and confirmed 10 July 1921 by F.C. Nickle.

1920:
Living at Marysvale. Attended school during previous year.

30 July 1931:
Four popular young people stole a march on their friends when they went to Richfield Saturday and were quietly married. Ray Shelton was married to Adeline Keith and George Kennedy was married to Georgia Dalton. Their host of friends wish them happiness and success.

Source:
Richfield Reaper: 30 July 1931.

 

Harriett Dalton:
Daughter of Charles Wakeman Dalton and Elizabeth Heskett Allred. Born 27 January 1870, at Beaver, Beaver, Utah. Married Alma Straw 16 March 1890, at Springville, Utah, Utah. Died 30 April 1916, at Provo, Utah, Utah.

1880:
Living at Circle Valley Precinct.

 

Harry Dalton:
1868:
First mining location filed in Piute County, located by Jacob Hess 23 March 1868 and filed for record 7 September 1868: “Golden Curry Lead or Lode located in Ohio District North of Virginia City and running 3000 feet north west from north in the Curry Canyon. One hundred feet from the Curry dump pile south. Claiming all privileges granted by the United States Mining laws.” Claimants include Harry Dalton, claiming 25 feet.

 

Hazel LaReta Dalton:
Daughter of Charles R. Dalton and Virginia Peterson. Born 19 April 1914, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Farrell Barlow 18 March 1936. Blessed 6 September 1914, by James E. Peterson. Baptized by Louring A. Whittaker and confirmed by Charles R. Dalton, 3 September 1922. Removed to Junction, 4 December 1936. Received from Circleville, 7 March 1937.

1920:
Living at Circleville. 19 September 1930: The Misses Mary Greenhalgh and Gwen Zabriskie of Junction and Miss Hazel Dalton and partner of Circleville divided the first prize between them at the character ball given at the Colonial last Wednesday evening. The dance was very successful and the young people are hoping that it is but the forerunner of many more like dances.

Source:
Piute County News: 19 September 1930.

 

Iola Melissa Dalton:
Daughter of Morgan P. Dalton and Ida M. Dalley. Born 26 February 1907, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Lamar McIntosh, 2 June 1924. Blessed 30 June 1907, by Joseph Simkins. Baptized by John V. Samuelson and confirmed by James E. Peterson, 4 July 1915. Removed to Junction 15 June 1924. Received from Circleville, 19 October 1924.

1920:
Living at Circleville. Attended school during previous year; can read and write.

6 February 1931:
Mrs. Morgan P. Dalton of Circleville was visiting at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Iola McIntosh on Sunday.

Source:
Piute County News: 6 February 1931.

 

Iris Uarda Dalton:
Daughter of Martin Carrell Dalton, Jr. and Ivy Veater. Born 14 March 1915, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Joseph Merrill Fullmer 30 April 1932. Died 29 January 1983. Buried at Circleville. Blessed 4 July 1915 by John V. Samuelson. Baptized by Marcus Bickley and confirmed by Dwight L. Fullmer, 5 August 1923.

1920:
Living at Circleville.

8 August 1930:
A number of young people of Circleville went to Puffer Lake to spend a few days. Among those going were the Misses Garnetta and Arda Dalton, Pauline Bettenson, Una Peterson and Athenese Chamberlin and the Messrs Weldon Simkins.

8 November 1940:
Mrs. Etta Haycock and Mrs. Uarda Fullmer entertained at a family dinner at the Judd Haycock home in honor of Mrs. Haycock’s and Merrill Fullmer’s birthdays.

Source:
Piute County News: 8 August 1930, 8 November 1940.

 

James Burke Dalton:
Son of Charles A. Dalton and Sarah – Born 1 September 1881. Died 21 October 1889. Buried at Circleville.

 

Janet Dalton:
Daughter of Vernon Allred Dalton and Clara Edwards. Born 14 October 1938, at Richfield, Sevier, Utah. Blessed 5 February 1939 by C.B. Crane.

4 December 1958:
Max Reynolds, Steven Haycock, Ruth Bean, Sonja Horton, Janet Dalton and Afton Morgan all came home from the BYU to spend the Thanksgiving holiday with members of their families.

25 December 1958:
The following students are home from the colleges and universities: Max Reynolds, Steven Haycock, Mauna Lee Allen, Marie Davis, Jannett Dalton, Sondra Horton and Robert Wilcox.

Source:
Richfield Reaper: 4 December 1958, 25 December 1958.

 

Joyce Dalton:
10 April 1942:
Mr. and Mrs. Chell Dalton had as guests on Easter their daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Alma Hansen, and daughters, Arlene and Joyce, of Corinne.

Source:
Piute County News: 10 April 1942.

 

Judith Jean Dalton:
Daughter of Arthur W. Dalton and Florence Gardiner. Born 3 August 1940, at Richfield, Sevier, Utah. Blessed 6 October 1940 by Thomas Cartridge.

 

Julia Emmaline Dalton:
Daughter of Myron R. Dalton and Alice M. Hall. Born 19 September 1890, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Don Edwin Nay. Died 20 December 1987. Buried at Marysvale. Baptized and confirmed 10 July 1921 by F.C. Nickle.

1920:
Living at Alunite. Can read and write.

18 October 1934:
The Marysvale ward conference was held here Sunday. A new Relief society organization was perfected, as follows: Mrs. Nettie King, president; Mrs. Naomi Foisy, and Mrs. Rachel Brox, counselors; Mrs. Emma Nay, secretary-treasurer.

3 September 1937:
Mrs. Emma Nay and son, Theron, left Monday morning with Mrs. Leda Rasmussen and children of Ephraim, who have been visiting in Marysvale for the last two weeks. They intend to stay in Ephraim a short time, going on to Evanston, Wyoming, to visit Mr. Nay and the boys with tentative plans for a trip through Yellowstone National Park.

3 August 1939:
B.H. club No. 5 met for a five hundred party Thursday to honor out-going officers and new officers, and to celebrate the birthday of a member, Mrs. Mary Anderson. The party was held at the home of Mrs. Laura Bertelson at Marysvale. Two new members were taken into the club, Mrs. Dick Knauss and Mrs. Arley Edwards. Mrs. Lura Coates was elected president, and Mrs. Jennie Hamel, secretary. Prizes were won by Mrs. Preal Nielsen, Mrs. Emma Nay, Mrs. May Chase and Mrs. Cassie Harris.

21 November 1941:
Complimentary to Mrs. Lucy James, Better Homes club No. 1 entertained in honor of her birthday anniversary at her home Friday evening of last week. Mrs. James was presented with a lovely gift by the club members. A delicious luncheon, games and a social hour were enjoyed. Participating were Mesdames John Pearson, Charles Hampton, Edwin Nay, Chris Gregerson, Albert Barney, Orson Harris, Annie Dennis, Floyd Moore, Ralph Fredrick, William Blackwell and the honored guest.

19 December 1941:
Mrs. Leonard Shelton, Mrs. William Cropper, Mrs. Hal Munson and Mrs. Harold Ward were hostesses at a well-arranged luncheon and card party at the latter’s home Thursday afternoon of last week. Covers were placed for 33 guests. Prizes for “500” were awarded to Mrs. Ralph Fredrick, first, Mrs. Edwin Nay, second, and Mrs. George Brox, consolation.

19 December 1941:

Mrs. Chell Dalton, Theone Dalton, Mrs. Edwin Nay and Mrs. Ervin Mellor were shopping in Richfield Saturday.

16 January 1942:
Better Homes club no. 1 met Thursday of last week for a quilting at the home of Mrs. Annie Dennis. The day was spent quilting and visiting. A delicious dinner was served to five members by the hostess. The next meeting will be Friday, the 16th, at the home of Mrs. Edwin Nay.

13 February 1942:
Those going on the excursion to the Manti temple Wednesday of this week were Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hampton, Mrs. Lucy James, Mrs. Mary Lunt, Mrs. Fred N. Swalberg, Mrs. James Henrie, and Mrs. Edwin Nay.

Sources:
Gravestone.

Piute County News:
3 September 1937, 21 November 1941, 19 December 1941, 16 January 1942, 13 February 1942.

Richfield Reaper:
18 October 1934, 3 August 1939.

 

Juliette Dalton:
Daughter of Charles Wakeman Dalton and Juliette Bowen. Born 13 June 1856. Married Thaddeus E. Fullmer. Died 20 September 1908. Buried at Circleville; stone reads: “She was a kind and affectionate wife and a fond mother”. Member of Circleville ward. Died of dropsy.

 

Karen Dalton:
Daughter of Wiley Grant Dalton and Atheneas Revoe Chamberlain. Born 18 October 1939, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 3 December 1939 by Dwight L. Fullmer.

 

Kathleen Dalton:
Daughter of Ward B. Dalton and Mary Simkins. Born 14 May 1938, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 7 August 1938 by Rosten L. Simkins.

 

Keith Dahlmayne Dalton:
Son of Delbert C. Dalton and Ella Rhea Savage. Born 7 October 1932, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 1 January 1933 by Charles R. Dalton. Baptized and confirmed by Joseph D. Betenson, 23 March 1941.

8 January 1953:
Since the holidays are over and the young people have returned to school, the old town seems lonely. Bob Horton, Billy Crane, and Jo Anne Beebe, from the B.A.C.; Paul Morgan, Clyde Whittaker, Keith Dalton, Gale Whittaker and Bryan Fullmer from the USAC were among those ringing out the Old and ringing in the new Year.

4 December 1958:
Mr. and Mrs. Keith Dalton and children have been in Clarkston for a week visiting with friends and relatives.

Source:
Richfield Reaper: 8 January 1953, 4 December 1958.

 

Kenley Dalton:
Son of Wells Wakeman Dalton & Von Loraine Brox .

21 November 1941:
Mrs. George Brox assisted her small son, Blane, in entertaining a group of friends at their home Sunday afternoon to celebrate his seventh birthday. Dainty refreshments and games were enjoyed by Kenley Dalton, Norman Shelton, Max Frampton, Joan Ward, Patsy Lou Jensen, Betty Lou Wilcox, Elaine Epling, Ila Beth Johnson, Earlene Brox, Linda Ogden, Geraldine James and Jackie Stocks.

13 February 1942:
Mrs. Wells Dalton entertained at a delightful children’s party at her home on Saturday in honor of the seventh birthday of her son, Kenley. Games and delicious refreshments were enjoyed by 21 children.

29 May 1942:
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Brox and daughters, Earlene and Merrily, Rulon Brox and Mrs. Wells Dalton and son, Kenley, spent last weekend with Mr. and Mrs. George Brox in Salt Lake City.

 

Kenneth LaVar Dalton:
The son of Charles Robert and Virginia Peterson.

Kenneth was born 1 March 1911, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Edra Alliene Elder, 7 June 1933, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. Married Athene Whittaker, 27 November 1938. Died 20 May 1951, in Piute Reservoir, Piute Co., Utah. Buried at Circleville.

Blessed 1 October 1911, by James E. Peterson; baptized by James L. Whittaker and confirmed by Charles R. Dalton, 10 July 1921; ordained a deacon, 5 August 1923, by Charles R. Dalton; ordained a teacher, 8 February 1926, by Charles R. Dalton; ordained a priest, 25 February 1930, by Charles R. Dalton; ordained an elder, 30 May 1933, by Bishop Francis B. Jackman.

Ken studied all the things he did, and nothing was done by guesswork, or by chance. He was a good student, When he finished his high school career, he went on to Junior College for sometime, when he got through and received his diploma, he never stopped studying. You could go into his house, into his office and find books there of various kinds that he would delve into and in which he would find in formation that was helpful to him in whatever way he wanted to apply it. He was a great student of the mercantile business and for that reason I believe that the people of our town can be proud of the fact that there isn't a store in all of this state that is as modern and up to date and as well managed as the store that we have in Circleville. Not in any city in the state can you find one that is any better, He could do that because he was a student of the mercantile business. He not only understood the selling of goods to people, but he understood the science of it and reasons for it and he applied those in his life and in his business and as a result was very successful, There is another thing that I admired about him very much and that was that he had a perfect control of his mind and his emotions. Now I don't believe there is anybody sitting in this audience today that I haven't differed with on some occasion and on some things. It is surprising to note how some of the m react and I have argued with Brother Dalton a few times on things that he and I disagreed and I told him what I thought and he told me what he thought and no one got angry or mad and for that

reason I thought he was a very admirable man. He didn't try to make me absorb the things that he thought at all, but he believed in being reasonable and sensible about a lot of things. Once or twice when things got pretty hot and it looked like there might be physical trouble and I never in all my life saw a man who could control himself and handle himself as well in those circumstances that he could, because of that, he made friends all over the country and averted a lot of trouble and disagreement s that come to some people, who have not learned to take care of themselves emotionally, like he has done. Like Brother Cannon says, he was an indefatigable worker. That's one thing that he never did seem to tire of and that's only half of it. He got a lot of pleasure out of working and that's something a lot of us don't do you know and I think that's one thing where people get a lot of good out of this world is the joy and pleasure that they find in working and that's the thing that he has done. Apparently, he has found the thing in his life that he enjoys very much and that he enjoys working at a great deal, and when he quit working and went away for recreation, he was just as earnest in his recreation as he was in his work. In the world today, we have a lot of people you knew who don't believe in work, unless they can work the other person and I am proud to say that this man, whom we are honoring today, this man didn't believe in that philosophy. He believed in carrying his end and doing his share. Athene and Kenneth were never officially married.

Kenneth LaVar was blessed by his grandfather, James E. Peterson. He was baptized by James L. Whittaker, and confirmed by his grandfather, Charles R. Dalton. He was sealed to both wives, but was divorced on Jan. 22, 1938 from his first wife, Edra Ailean Elder.

The gravestone for Kenneth L. and his wife, Athene is in the Circleville Cemetery. Athene is still living.

22 May 1925:
The Circleville Graduation Exercises.

The Eighth grade graduating exercises of the Circleville School were held at 2 o'clock Thursday afternoon, May 14, 1925. An interesting and unique program was presented to a well filled house. The following students received certificates: Kenneth Dalton .

3 September 1937:
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Dalton and Mr. and Mrs. A.O. Smoot have come home after attending a convention at Ogden. Notary public; commissioned 14 March 1944, expired 13 March 1948; commission renewed 14 March 1948, expired 13 March 1952.

20 May 1951:
General merchandise dealer. Died of accidental drowning in Piute Reservoir. Funeral services held 24 May 1951, conducted by bishop.

3 September 1937:
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Dalton and Mr. and Mrs. A.O. Smoot have come home after attending a convention at Ogden. Notary public; commissioned 14 March 1944, expired 13 March 1948; commission renewed 14 March 1948, expired 13 March 1952.

20 May 1951:
General merchandise dealer. Died of accidental drowning in Piute Reservoir. Funeral services held 24 May 1951, conducted by bishop.

 

LaRae Dalton:
Daughter of Myron Challis Dalton and Elvira Williams. Born 8 February 1925, at Marysvale, Piute, Utah. Blessed 10 May 1925 by Thomas Black. Baptized 3 August 1935 by Verl Henrie; confirmed 4 August 1935 by Thomas Black.

13 February 1942:
Mr. and Mrs. Byron Hansen entertained at a family dinner at their home on Thursday evening of last week. The occasion was in honor of the first birthday anniversary of their daughter, Peggy. Guests included Mr. and Mrs. Chell Dalton and daughters, Chella and LaRue and Mr. and Mrs. Ervin Mellor.

Source:
Piute County News: 13 February 1942.

 

Lawrence Whittaker Dalton:
Son of Martin Carrell Dalton and Charlotte Ellen Whittaker. Born 7 November 1905, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Died 17 October 1983. Buried at Circleville; stone reads: “Sgt. US Army/World War II”. Blessed 4 March 1906 by James E. Peterson. Baptized by James Mogensen and confirmed by Joseph Simkins, 23 August 1914. Ordained priest 15 February 1926 by Charles E. Dalton.

1920:
Living at Circleville. Attended school during previous year; can read and write.

7 November 1924:
The organizing of the Circleville High School government was a big success and everything has started off with a lot of pep. In order to make the organizing more interesting, the students divided into two parties, the ‘Boosters’ and the ‘Spark Plugs’ Candidates from each party were chosen to run for the positions of Mayor, Chief Councilman, four other councilmen, and recorder. The result of the voting appears below: “Booster” candidate for chief councilman; won 40 votes to opponent’s 54.

28 November 1924:
Nine ‘Rah’s’ for the Circleville High School! We have a Dramatic Club organized now and hope it won’t be long until we can present to your people a play that will make the parents of Piute Co. proud to think that their sons and daughters are enrolled in this school. The Dramatic Club was organized last Wednesday with about twenty-five students present who were desirous of becoming members. After part of the members were initiated these officers were chosen: Miss Thalia Allen as President, Mr. Lawrence Dalton as Vice-Pres., with Nellie Barton, Wanda Luke, Ray Horton and Burt Jackman as committee.

20 March 1925:
Thirty-one students from the Circleville High School accompanied by superintendent, principal and three teachers toured the county, visiting Marysvale, Junction and Kingston on Thursday, May 7.

22 May 1925:
C.V. High School Commencement a Success. Thursday evening May 14th the Commencement exercises of the C.V. high School were held in Circleville. The speaker of the evening was Dr. T.L. Martin of the BYU who gave a very spirited and inspirational address. The theme of his talk was Men who have made good and become leaders in their day. He cited as examples, Galileo, Luther, Joseph Smith and others. Said we get our future leaders form the youth of today so why should we not prepare them for leadership. The program was rendered as follows: Chorus “Come Where the Lilies Bloom” by the school chorus. Invocation by Luris Allen. Musical Reading, “The Old Fashioned Girl” by Lawrence Dalton. Alice Martensen and Kathleen Horton (by special request) An appreciation by Rex Fullmer. This was followed by the last High School dance of the season. Those completing the third year are: Luris Allen, Rex Fullmer, Rex Thompson, Rollo Whittaker, Jay Applegate, Lawrence Dalton, Alma Morgan, Ivan Lambson, Darvel Dobson, Cloyd Morrill.

22 April 1927:
Lawrence Dalton and J. Applegate, alumni members of the [Circleville] high school, were Easter dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. W.D. Harrison.

Sources:
Piute County News:
7 November 1924, 28 November 1924, 20 March 1925, 22 May 1925.

Garfield County News:
22 April 1927.

 

Leda A. Dalton:
20 April 1916:
Leda Dalton has gone to Ephraim to spend the summer with her sister, Mrs. May Bertelsen.

12 November 1936:
A large crowd of relatives and friends of the Rasmussen family went to Salina Friday to attend the funeral of Cloyd Rasmussen, who was run over by a train at Fountain Green while unloading a tank of gas on November 2. Cloyd had lived here this past 20 years. He married Leda Dalton, who with three children, Ona, 14, O’Neil 10, ad Clair, age 6 months, survives. He is also survived by his aged mother, Mrs. Peter Sorensen of Spring City.

Source:
Piute Chieftain:
20 April 1916 - Richfield Reaper: 12 November 1936.

 

LeRoy Dalton:
Son of Charles Albert Dalton and Sarah Jane Wiley.

Born 18 September 1887, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Thalia McDonough, 8 November 1911.

Blessed by James E. Peterson. Baptized 12 October 1895, by Frank P. Fullmer; confirmed 7 November 1895, by Laban D. Morrill. Ordained a teacher, 8 February 1904, by Thomas Hayward; ordained a priest, 31 December 1905, by James E. Peterson; ordained an elder, 12 April 1908, by Mahonri M. Steele; ordained a seventy, 30 August 1921, by Rulon S. Wells. Removed to Payson, 29 August 1931.

LeRoy Dalton graduated from grade school in Circleville, Utah. He later attended Snow College in Cedar City for one year. On November 8, 1913, he married Mary Ann Thalia McDonough in the Manti Temple. He spent many years in Church work and is at present a High Priest, 1964. He helped build three ward buildings: one in Circleville, Utah (Circleville Ward), one in Payson, Utah (3rd Ward), and one in South Gate, California (Walnut Ward). He was a farmer, raised cattle and sheep, and did road construction when possible. He was Road Agent in Piute County for eight years, worked as foreman for the State in Sanpete and Piute Counties, building and maintaining highways.

He built a trail 18 miles long from the foothills, south of Circleville to what is known as Adams Head, in the Nebo Mt. Range, with only the help of a hand level, for grading, and work horses for power. While working for the Forestry Service, he built the first gravel road through Red Canyon to Bryce Canyon, Utah, which was later taken over by Union Pacific Railroad.

He worked as a grader and heavy-duty operator on highways in Ogden, Spanish Fork, Payson, and Circleville, Utah, Canyons. His last fifteen years of work were at South Gate, California, for which he received a certificate of outstanding service.

He was elected Representative on the Democratic ticket from Piute County, in 1928 and sat in the House of Representatives in the Capitol at Salt Lake City, Utah, in 1928-1929 and 1929-1930.

1916-17:
Farming 16 acres (value: $450), at Circleville.

14 November 1918:
Subscribed for bonds “of the fourth issue” (World War I war bonds), at Circleville.

1918-19:
Farming 26 acres (value: $1,778), at Circleville.

5 March 1919:
Repair Canyon Road. LeRoy Dalton, state road agent for Piute county, was here from Circleville last Friday on official business. Mr. Dalton stated that he had completed plans for repairing the canyon road between the mount of Deer Creek canyon and Marysvale. Just as soon as the weather will permit several teams will be put on and the road put in shape.

1920:
Farmer, general farm; living in Circleville; can read and write.

1920-21:
Farming 12 acres (value: $813), at Circleville.

1922-23:
Farming 20 acres (value: $1,400), at Circleville.

1924-25:
Farming 42 acres (value: $4,313), at Circleville.

27 January 1928:
Stake Sunday School Board Holds Meeting. On Thursday evening the Stake Sunday School board held a meeting (in) the Junction Auditorium. Several matters of importance to the Sunday school work was taken up. Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Allen, Mrs. Ina Chamberlin and Mrs. Eventa Fullmer and LeRoy Dalton of Circleville and W.E. Bay of Kingston were the out of town members present.

20 December 1929:
LeRoy and Wiley Dalton and Mr. and Mrs. Warren Peterson of Circleville were doing business in Junction the first of the week.

25 October 1940:

Mr. and Mrs. LeRoy Dalton and daughters, Von and Thelma of Payson, spent several days visiting relatives and friends.

Sources:
Piute County News:
27 January 1928, 20 December 1929, 25 October 1940.

Piute Chieftain:
14 November 1918, 5 March 1919.

 

Linda Dalton:
Daughter of Vernon Allred Dalton and Clara Edwards. Born 16 June 1942.

Died 28 April 1944. Buried at Circleville.

 

Louisa J. Dalton:
Daughter of Morgan P. Dalton and Ida M. Dalley. Born 10 July 1905, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 6 July 1905 by Thoms Hayward. Baptized by John V. Samuelson and confirmed by James E. Peterson, 4 July 1915. Removed to Washington 23 February 1924.

1920:
Living at Circleville. Attended school during previous year; can read and write.

 

Marie Dalton:
Daughter of Morgan P. Dalton and Ida M. Dalley. Born 25 July 1910, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Blessed 2 October 1910, by James E. Peterson. Baptized by Irvin Allen and confirmed by James O. Meeks, 17 August 1919.

1920:
Living at Circleville. Attended school during previous year.

 

Martin Carroll Dalton, Sr.:
Son of Charles Dalton and Elizabeth Allred. Born 17 February 1867, at Beaver, Beaver, Utah. Married Charlotte Ellen (Nellie) Whittaker, 29 January 1889, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Children:

Mary Irene Dalton, born 4 December 1889, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Martin Carroll Dalton, Jr., born 1 May 1894, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

James C. Dalton, born 11 November 1896.

Nellie Vera Dalton, born 6 November 1897, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Taylor Whittaker Dalton, born 7 April 1900, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Francis Joshua Dalton, born 5 February 1902, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Lawrence Whittaker Dalton, born 7 November 1905, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Vernon Allred Dalton, born 12 October 1909, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Died 18 December 1936. Buried at Circleville.

Baptized and confirmed, 6 June 1909, by James E. Peterson; ordained an elder, 13 March 1909, by Joseph F. Heywood. Temple sealing 16 June 1909.

29 January 1889:
Circleville - Wedding performed by James Wiley, justice of the peace; witnesses: M.D. Morgan and Elvira Dalton.

1880:
Laborer; living in Circle Valley Precinct.

5 September 1902:
Republican Convention. Circleville, Sept. 3rd, 1902. – Convention was called to order by County chairman Horace Morrill. J.E. Peterson was elected chairman and Miss Josephine King, secretary. R.A. Allen, Wm. E. White and E.E. Sprague, committee on credentials reported the following-named delegates as being entitled to representation. Marysvale–J.S. Baler, James Stocks, W.E. White, F.J. Lyon (proxy by J.S. Baler) and Wm. E. White.

Circleville- MC Dalton, J.M. Petersen, Heber Wiley, Joseph Betensen, J.C. Whittaker, Gideon Snyder, and James Long, Jr.

5 August 1903:
Signed petition asking County Commission to consolidate Circleville and Lost Creek School Districts, claiming that neither district “is able to build a school house of sufficient capacity to accommodate all the children of their respective districts, nor to grade the scholars according to their merits, resulting in the holding back of children that ought to be advanced, for their slower going class mates.”

1903-04:
Farming 274 acres (value: $3,240), at Circleville.

1916-17:
Farming 191 acres (value: $2308), at Circleville.

5 September 1918:
Of Circleville; real property on delinquent tax list to be redeemed or sold on 16 December 1918.

14 November 1918:
Subscribed for bonds “of the fourth issue” (World War I war bonds), at Circleville.

1920:
Farmer, home farm; living in Circleville; can read and write.

1908-09:
Farming 251 acres (value: $3,205), in Circleville.

1920-21:
Farming 138 acres (value: $5305), at Circleville.

1922-23:
Farming 439 acres (value: $6,735), at Circleville.

1924-25:
Farming 173 acres (value: $9,923), at Circleville.

17 December 1926:
Delinquent taxes owed on stock of Circleville Irrigation Company:

Sources:
Piute Chieftain:
5 September 1918, 14 November 1918.

Garfield County News:
17 December 1926.

 

Martin Carroll Dalton, Jr.:

Son of Martin Carroll Dalton, Sr., and Ellen Charlotte Whittaker; born 1 May 1894, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Iva Lucinda Veater.

Children:

Afton Garneta Dalton, born 12 August 1913, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Iris Uarda Dalton, born 14 March 1915, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Carroll Garth Dalton, born 19 September 1917, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Francis Cecil Dalton, born 25 February 1920, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Rhea Druce Dalton, born 17 October 1922, at Panguitch, Garfield, Utah.

Taylor Boyde Dalton, born 5 December 1924, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Sybil Joy Dalton, born 22 September 1927, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Died 29 January 1961, at Provo, Utah, Utah. Buried at Circleville.

Baptized 6 September 1902, by Laban D. Morrill; confirmed 7 September 1902, by Jorgen P. Jensen; ordained a deacon, 9 July 1908, by James E. Peterson.

1916-17:
Farming 20 acres (value: $440), at Circleville.

5 September 1918:
Of Circleville; real property on delinquent tax list to be redeemed or sold on 16 December 1918.

14 November 1918:
Subscribed for bonds “of the fourth issue” (World War I war bonds), at Circleville. The homes of Geo. Fox, J.R. Norton and Carrel Dalton, are under quarantine on account of the prevalence of the influenza. Those afflicted are not seriously sick and it is believed that with the lifting of the quarantine at these homes, Circleville will be about clear of the disease.

1918-19:
Farming 20 acres (value: $300), at Circleville.

1920:
Farmer, home farm; living in Circleville; can read and write.

1924-25:
Farming 10 acres (value: $640), at Circleville.

25 March 1927:
Carroll Dalton is busily remodeling his old home on the highway. He intends to move in as soon as the reconstruction is completed.

7 September 1939:
A horse race met was held on Friday afternoon. Considerable excitement was created in the second race, between Marcus, owned by Blake Robinson of Junction, and Pancho, owned by Jack Perkins of Spry, with Basil Lay of Marysvale up on Marcus, and Carrol Dalton of Circleville up on Pancho, when both mounts fell at the first turn, spilling their riders in the dirt. Dalton took an airplane-spin, landing about forty feet in a field. He received several broken ribs, a broken leg, and a lacerated and bruised wrist. He was attended by Dr. K.L. Jenkins, and later went to Richfield for X-ray pictures. The most creditable account of the accident seemed to be that a black dog, which had been following horses in the previous race, had darted out at the horses. Lay was uninjured. Dalton is reported to be recovering.

13 February 1942:
Richfield visitors Saturday were Mr. and Mrs. Garold Horton, Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Anderson, Mr. and Mrs. Carole Dalton and Mr. and Mrs. Harold Gottfredson.

29 January 1961:
Died in Utah Hospital of broncho pneumonia. Funeral services held 4 February 1961, at Circleville chapel.

1 February 1961:
CIRCLEVILLE, Piute County – Martin Carol Dalton, Jr., 66, died Sunday in a Provo hospital after a long illness. Born May 1, 1894, Circleville, to Martin C. and Nellie Whittaker Dalton. Married Iva Lucinda Veater Dec. 24, 1912. She died Oct. 24, 1960. Member, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Survivors: sons, daughters, Mrs. Garneta Thomas, Mrs. Rea Mortensen, Taylor B., Mrs. Sybil Edvalson, all Las Vegas, Nev.; Mrs. Uarda Fullmer, Phoenix, Ariz.; France Cecil, Salt Lake City; Garth C., Ogden; 23 grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; brothers, sisters, Mrs. Vera Haycock, Mrs. Irene Smith, Lawrence, Vernon Dalton, all Circleville. Funeral Saturday, 2 p.m., Circleville LDS Ward’s Chapel. Burial, Circleville Cemetery.

Sources:
Garfield County News:
25 March 1927.

Piute Chieftain:
5 September 1918, 14 November 1918.

Richfield Reaper:
7 September 1939.

Piute County News:
13 February 1942.

Salt Lake Tribune:
1 February 1961.  

 

Marvin Albert Dalton:
Son of Marvin Burke Dalton and Mary Emma Hall.

14 September 1965:
MONROE – Funeral services for Marvin Albert Dalton, 73, former southern Utah resident, who died Sunday at Pollock Pines, Calif. of natural causes, will be held Thursday (today) at the Neal S. Magleby Mortuary at 2 p.m. He was born Oct. 19, 1891, in Circleville. He married Flossie Lott. He was a member of the LDS Church and a construction worker. Survivors include his widow, sons, daughters, Albert V., D.M., Mrs. Walter Reynolds, all Pollock Pines; Mrs. A.J. Rothlisberger, Heber City; Grant, Hatch; Mrs. Boyd Barney, Santa Cruz, Calif.; Royal, North Las Vegas; Mrs. Harry G. Mahn of Saugus, Calif.; 34 grandchildren; 35 great grandchildren; brother, Lee, Provo. Friends may call Thursday at the mortuary one hour prior to services. Burial will be in the Monroe Cemetery.

23 September 1965:
Funeral services for Marvin Albert Dalton, 73, Pollock Pines, Calif., formerly of Circleville, were held Thursday in the Magleby Mortuary Chapel, with Bishop N.A. Winget, Monroe North Ward, conducting. Speakers included Elliott Larsen, Ferdinand Erickson and Bishop Winget, Joan Swain played prelude and postlude music. She also sang two numbers. Homer Olsen offered the invocation and Dale Bredsguard gave the benediction. Burial was in the Monroe City Cemetery where Bishop Winget offered the graveside prayer. Pallbearers included Karl Bohman, Remo Bredsguard, Elwin Cloward, Ervin Bridges, Hanmer Smith and Gerald Washburn.

Source:
Richfield Reaper:
14 September 1965, 23 September 1965.

 

Mary Pearl Dalton:
Daughter of LeRoy Dalton and Mary A.T. McDonough. Born 27 May 1920, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 5 September 1920 by LeRoy Dalton. Baptized by Oscar Wiltshire and confirmed by LeRoy Dalton, 6 October 1920. Removed to Payson, 3 December 1930.

 

Mary Rosetta Dalton:
Daughter of Charles Wakeman Dalton and Juliette Bowen. Born 23 April 1864, at Centerville, Davis, Utah. Married 25 December 1881, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Died 13 June 1940, at Holladay, Salt Lake, Utah.

 

Mary Sharon Dalton:
Daughter of Delbert C. Dalton and Ella Rhea Savage. Born 21 April 1941, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 6 July 1941 by Delbert C. Dalton.

4 December 1958:
Sharon Dalton was home from Cedar City for the weekend.

Source:
Richfield Reaper: 4 December 1958.

 

Maxine M. Dalton:
Daughter of Philip D. Dalton and Emelia Rasmussen. Born 25 August 1911, at Salina, Sevier, Utah. Baptized 28 October 1919 by George F. Jackson; confirmed 28 October 1919 by Andrew Christensen.

1920:
Living at Marysvale. Attended school during previous year.

 

Mona Dalton:
Daughter of Delbert C. Dalton and Ella Rhea Savage. Born 9 February 1929, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 5 May 1929, by Delbert C. Dalton. Baptized by George Westwood and confirmed by R. Elwood Dalton, 17 July 1938.

 

Morgan Leon “Whitie” Dalton:
Son of Morgan P. Dalton and Ida M. Dalley. Born 27 May 1912, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Ila Barlow. Married Ethel Norton 27 May 1937.

Buried at Circleville. Blessed 6 October 1912 by Joseph Simkins. Baptized by Delbert Dalton and confirmed by Bp. Henry Sudweeks 29 June 1924. Ordained deacon 5 February 1928 by Charles R. Dalton; priest 18 February 1930 by Bp. James L. Whittaker. Divorced from Ila Barlow 27 August 1936. Temple sealing to Ethel Norton 13 April 1963.

24 September 1997:
Morgan Leon “Whitie” Dalton, age 85, died Sept. 18, 1997 at the Alpine Care Center in Pleasant Grove, Utah from causes incident to age. He was born May 27, 1912 in Circleville, Utah to Morgan Peadon Dalton and Ida Dalley Dalton, one of 10 children. He married Ila Barlow, later divorced. From this marriage was born one daughter, Darla Dean Tarrant, deceased. She is survived by two daughters, Cynthia and Angela. He married Ethel Norton on May 27, 1937 in Junction, Utah. Their marriage was solemnized in the St. George Temple on April 13, 1963. She died April 21, 1986. From this marriage are surviving daughters, Dolores Morgan, her husband, George, Salt Lake City and three children, Melinda, Mitchell, and Russell and Nan Nell Robison, her husband, Kent, Orem and her children, Kelli Herlevi and husband, Rick, Brandi Hawkins and her husband, Jason, Landon, serving an LDS Mission in the California Arcadia Mission, and Bryan. One great-granddaughter, Summer Ethel Herlevi, is named after her great-grandmother, Ethel. He married Thelda Anderson in August 1988. She died in July 1990. Whitie was raised in Circleville where he lived until after his beloved Ethel's death. He and Thelda lived in Richfield and after her death he lived in Crosslands Retirement Center in Sandy until his declining health made it necessary for him to move to Colonial Manor in Lehi, and later to Alpine Valley Care Center in Pleasant Grove. He was an active member of the LDS Church and held various positions in the Circleville Ward. He was a farmer, and retired from UDOT in 1974. He was a member of the Circleville Volunteer Fire Department for 48 years. He was an excellent gardener; his and Ethel's yards were always beautiful, and he worked hard for the Circleville Beautification Committee as well. He loved to see things grow, and loved to go to work with the pruning shears and the fertilizer. Daddy, it has been eleven years for you since Mama died. You have waited long for this joyous reunion. This is a time of joy, not a time of sorrow. The family wishes to thank the Alpine Care Center for their care and concern during these last months, and with a special thanks to Jennifer for her love and kindness to him and the family during this time. Funeral services will be held on Saturday, September 27, 12 p.m., in the Circleville LDS Ward Chapel. Friends may call at the ward chapel in Circleville on Saturday morning from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Burial will be in the Circleville Cemetery. Funeral Directors, Neal S. Magleby & Sons Mortuary, Richfield, Utah.

Source:
Deseret News:
24 September 1997.

 

Morgan Pedon Dalton:
Son of Charles Wakeman Dalton and Juiletta Bowen.

Born 6 June 1867, in Utah. Married Ida Marilla Dalley 3 April 1905.

Children:
Louisa J. Dalton, born 10 July 1905, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Iola Melissa Dalton, born 26 February 1907, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Marie Dalton, born 25 July 1910, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Morgan Leon Dalton, born 27 May 1912, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Earl Dalton, born 27 February 1916, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Myrtle Dalton, born 22 March 1918, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Alma Dalton, born 14 June 1920, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Sylva Dalton, born 28 March 1923, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Raymond Dalton, born 7 May 1928, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

1880:
Laborer; living in Circle Valley Precinct; father born in Pennsylvania; mother born in New York.

1893:
Surety for bond of Mary J. Mangum as guardian of children of Martin A. Mangum.

1903-04:
Farming 55 acres, as agent (value: $505), at Circleville.

1908-1909:
Farming 55 acres (value: $505), in Circleville.

1911-12:
Farming 25 acres (value: $150), at Circleville.

1916-17:
Farming 15 acres (value: $255), at Circleville.

14 November 1918:
Subscribed for bonds “of the fourth issue” (World War I war bonds), at Circleville.

1918-19:
Farming 195 acres (value: $9,355), at Circleville.

1920:
Living at Circleville. Farmer. Can read and write.

1920-21:
Farming 17 acres (value: $475), at Circleville.

1922-23:
Farming 17 acres (value: $1,020), at Circleville.

1924-25:
Farming 31 acres (value: $2,864), at Circleville.

10 July 1931:
Quite a lot of excitement prevailed in Circleville during the first of last week when lightening struck a large tree in front of the home of M.P. Dalton. Splinters were thrown into the street and on the state highway. We are told that some dropped to their knees in the excitement to pray while others fainted from shock. No one was hurt.

29 March 1936:
Died of urinary poisoning.

Sources:
Gravestone.

Piute Chieftain:
14 November 1918.

Piute County News:
10 July 1931.

 

Myron Challis “Chell” Dalton:
Son of Myron Roundy Dalton and Alice Maria " Hattie " Hall.

5 December 1918:
Mr. and Mrs. Chell Dalton, Mrs. Alice Williams and boys spent Thanksgiving in Joseph with relatives. They returned home Friday evening.

1920:
Living at Marysvale. Gold miner. Can read and write.

25 October 1940:
Arlo Dalton and Richard Stuck of San Pedro, California arrived Friday to take in the deer hunting. They were guests of Chall Dalton while here.

Lloyd Hansen and Mr. and Mrs. Alma Hansen of Corinne were here for the deer hunt. Lloyd Hansen visited with his brother, E.C. Hansen and parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Hanson, and the Alma Hansen family visited with the Chell Dalton family.

8 November 1940:
Mr. and Mrs. Byron Hanson of Telluride, Colorado visited at the home of Mrs. Hanson’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chell Dalton for several days last week. They were called to Utah by the tragic death of their brother-in-law, David Jones, of Beaver. Mr. and Mrs. Chell Dalton also attended the funeral in Beaver Tuesday.

16 January 1942:
Piute County Civilian Defense Board Organized at Meeting in Junction Saturday Afternoon. With America at war, the establishment of Utah’s civilian defense council with its affiliated county councils for the protection of its people and its property is being speeded up. The Piute county defense council, headed by Carl G. Beebe, with Wallace Thompson as vice-chairman and Jay W. Applegate as secretary, met Saturday at the court house in Junction to perfect its organization and for instructions as to the duties of the chairmen and their sub- committees under the different divisions. The commodities rationing board which has been appointed to function in Piute county for the rationing of tires and tubes are C.B. Crane of Circleville, chairman; Chell Dalton of Marysvale and Scott Price of Junction, with John Paul Fullmer of Circleville as secretary.

3 February 1942:
Mr. and Mrs. Byron Hansen entertained at a family dinner at their home on Thursday evening of last week. The occasion was in honor of the first birthday anniversary of their daughter, Peggy. Guests included Mr. and Mrs. Chell Dalton and daughters, Chella and LaRue and Mr. and Mrs. Ervin Mellor.

13 February 1942:
Chell Dalton, Theone Dalton, and Champ Allen have gone to John’s Valley to cut timber.

10 April 1942:
Mr. and Mrs. Chell Dalton had as guests on Easter their daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Alma Hansen, and daughters, Arlene and Joyce, of Corinne.

3 June 1948:
Marysvale Horse Races Set for June 17-18-19. Second Annual Running on New Fast Track. The Marysvale park is still wearing that new look for the opening of its second racing season scheduled for June 17, 18 and 19.

The new track which was constructed last year is in excellent condition. A full halfmile track, it is acclaimed by horsemen as the fastest track in the state, with a straight-of-way on which to start. Forty-six new stables were built last year and arrangements have been made for additional stables to take care of all entries. According to George Brox, who is general chairman in charge of arrangements, reservations are pouring in for stables and this years meet promises to draw horsemen and turf fans from all over the state. The three-day event which is being sponsored by the Marysvale Town will be under the direction of the Utah State Horse Racing Association. Committees that have worked to put things in shape for the meet are: advertising, Orson Harris, Walter Kennedy and Manton Gibbs; finance, J.E. Oscarson, Glen Prince, Clinton E. Howes and Leon Gibbs; stables and care of horses, Chell Dalton, Harold Johnson and Curt Lund; track and equipment, Hugh S. Newby, L. Haws Smoot and J.L. Smoot; concessions, Walter Kennedy; pari mutual betting, Lane J. Bertelson and Mr. and Mrs. Urban Johnson; program, J.L. Smoot; feed, John Paul Fullmer; parking, Curt Lund, Floyd Keller and Bert Wetzel. 11 December 1958: Mrs. Martin Streetman and family of Richfield and Miss Joyce Hansen of Dos Polos, Cal. a student at BYU visited with the Chell Daltons. Miss Hansen is a granddaughter of the Dalton's.

14 January 1960:
Mr. and Mrs. Alma Hansen and family of Bountiful visited Thursday with their parents Mr. and Mrs. Chell Dalton.

16 January 1962:
MARYSVALE, Piute County –

Myron Chell Dalton, 67, Marysvale, died Monday at 10 a.m. at the home of a daughter in Richfield after a lingering illness. Born Jan. 29, 1894, Circleville, Piute County, son of Myron R. and Alice Marie Hall Dalton. Married Elvira Williams March 14, 1917, in Junction. Had been employed as a miner. Member of the Church of Jesus Christ of latter-day Saints. Active in the Lions Club until it was disbanded in 1959. Survivors: widow; four daughters, son, Mrs. Alma (Eullia), Hanson, Bountiful; Mrs. Byron (Evadean) Hanson, Mrs. Jack (Chella) Stewart, both Marysvale; Mrs. Martin (LaRae) Streetman and Theone Dalton, both of Richfield; 23 grandchildren; to great-grandchildren; five sisters, two brothers, Mrs. Edwin (Emma Nay, San Fernando, Calif.; Mrs. Fullmer (May) Bertelson, Salt Lake City; Mrs. Lynn (Sivia) Bertelson, Torrance, Calif.; Mrs. Charles (Leda) Schitz, Orem; Mrs. Byron Anderson, Marysvale; Arlo Dalton, Lamita, Calif.; Byron Dalton, Harbor City, Calif.; half brother and half sister, Wells Dalton, Gunnison and Mrs. George (Georgia) Kennedy, Marysvale. Funeral services Saturday, 1 p.m., in the Marysvale Ward chapel. Friends may call Friday, 7 to 9 p.m. at the Magleby Mortuary, Richfield and at the family home in Marysvale Saturday prior to services. Burial in the Richfield City Cemetery.

18 January 1962:
Funeral Saturday for Chell Dalton in Marysvale.

MARYSVALE –
Funeral services will be held Saturday at 1 p.m. in the Marysvale Ward chapel for Myron Challis (Chell) Dalton, 66, who died Monday morning of a heart ailment at the home of a daughter, Mrs. Martin Streetman in Richfield. He was born Jan. 22, 1895 in Circleville, a son of Myron R. and Alice Marie Hall Dalton. He married Elvira Williams, March 14, 1917 in Junction. He was a member of the LDS Church. For the past six weeks he had resided with his daughter in Richfield. Mr. Dalton was a miner and was active in mining operations in this area for many years. Survivors include his widow, Marysvale; a son, Theone W. Dalton, Richfield, four daughters, Mrs. Martin (LaRee) Streetman, Richfield; Mrs. Alma (Eulala) Hansen, Bountiful, Mrs. Byron (Eva Dean) Hansen and Mrs. Jack (Chella) Stewart, both Marysvale; 24 grandchildren and two great grandchildren; three brothers, Arlo, LaMeda, Calif.; Byron, Harbor City, Calif., and Wells W., Gunnison; six sisters, Mrs. Emma Nay, Phoenix, Ariz.; Mrs. Mae Bertelson, Salt Lake City; Mrs. Sylvia Bertelson, Torrence, Calif.; Mrs. Leda Shultz, Orem; Mrs. Rowena Anderson and Mrs. Georgia Kennedy, both Marysvale. Friends may call Friday evening from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Neal S. Magleby and Sons Mortuary, Richfield and at the family home in Marysvale Saturday from 10 a.m. to time of services. Burial will be in the Richfield City Cemetery

Sources:
Piute County News:
25 October 1940, 8 November 1940, 16 January 1942, 13 February 1942, 10 April 1942.

Piute Chieftain:
5 December 1918.

Richfield Reaper:
3 June 1948, 11 December 1958, 14 January 1960, 18 January 1962.

Deseret News:
6 January 1962.

 

Myron Roundy Dalton:
Son of Charles Wakeman Dalton and Juliette Bowen. Born 11 September 1862, at Centerville, Davis, Utah. Married Alice Marie Hall 1 April 1889, at Ashley, Uintah, Utah. Died 25 February 1910, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Buried at Circleville.

1880:
Living at Circle Valley. Laborer.

1908-09:
Farming 55 acres (value: $505), in Circleville.

 

Myrtle Dalton:
Daughter of Morgan P. Dalton and Ida M. Dalley. Born 22 March 1918, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Elvin Prisbey 1939. Blessed 4 August 1918 by John V. Samuelson. Bptized by Robert Elwood Dalton and confirmed by Bp. Henry Sudweeks, 14 August 1927.

 

Ona Rowena Dalton:
Daughter of Myron R. and Alice Marie Hal Dalton.

2 May 1918:
Odd Fellow Services- The Methodist church was comfortably filled last Sunday evening the occasion being the observation of the 99th anniversary of the Odd Fellows lodge of the world, by the local order, No. 58, Rev. Martin Thomas was the principal speaker and his subject, “Fraternity,” was masterly handled. He stated that “fraternity in its broadest sense was brotherly relationship, and that Odd Fellowship for 99 years had been trying to direct, in harmony, man’s united effort to fraternalize the world, and how well the brother had succeeded, the world could judge.” A goodly representation from the Woodmen lodge was present and the solos by Mamie Bertelson and Rowena Dalton tended to make the occasion one long to be remembered.

23 May 1918:
Selling Many Stamps. The Thrift Stamp sale in Marysvale was given big boost this week by the liberal offer made by Patrick Henry, manger for the Marysvale Drug company. The drug firm is offering a “Baby Bond” free to the boy or girl under 14 years old selling the largest number of stamps during the week. Up to last night 773 stamps had been sold and Mary Sargent was leading in point of number by nine points over Leona Peterson, who stands second. The contest closes Saturday night at 6 o’clock and the two remaining days promise to be busy ones for the little salespeople who greet you with “Buy a Thrift Stamp, Please.” Following is the standing of the contestants showing the number of stamps sold: Leona Peterson, 163; Mary Sargent, 145; Verdu Anderson, 125; Rowena Dalton, 91; Otho Howes, 66; Zelda Hyatt, 59; Ruby Blakeslee, 56; Ethel Kennedy, 28; Conrad Kenyon, 22; Addie Johnson, 16; Jane Black, 16; Walter Kennedy, 10; Cecil Eppling, 9; Tessie Quinn, 4; Stella Quinn, 2; Eddie Quinn, 2; Albert Shelton, 2.

30 May 1918:
Stamp Contest Huge Success. As a result of the contest inaugurated by the Marysvale Drug company last week, 2,451 Thrift Stamps were sold and thereby the government fund to carry on the war was increased by $612.65. And all of this was done by the boys and girls of Marysvale. The contest was spirited from the opening day and Saturday, the closing day, proved the banner day, more than $300 in stamps having been sold. Rowena Dalton, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G.F. Dalton, captured the War Savings stamp as the prize for selling the most Thrift stamps. Miss Dalton sold a total of 658 stamps. Mary Sargent was a close second with a credit of 515 stamps. Twice during the week did the little rustlers cause a shortage in the stamp supply. The local supply was entirely exhausted and it was necessary to call on Richfield and Junction for stamps. The following is the standing of the contestants at the close of the week: Rowena Dalton, 658; Mary Sargent, 515; Verda Anderson, 391; Leona Peterson, 385; Zelda Hyatt, 182; Ruby Blakeslee, 100; Otho Howes, 80; Addie Johnson, 29; Ethel Kennedy, 28; Conrad Kenyon, 22; Jane Black, 20; Cecil Epling, 15; Walter Kennedy, 10; Tessie Quinn, 6; Stella Quinn, 4; Eddie Quinn, 4; Albert Shelton, 2.

5 June 1993:
MARYSVALE/FRUIT HEIGHTS--Ona Rowena Dalton Anderson, 86, of Fruit Heights, passed away June 4, 1993 at her home. She was born March 22, 1907 in Circleville, Utah to Myron R. and Alice Marie Hal Dalton. Married Wells Mellor; later divorced. Married Byron Anderson October 17, 1926; solemnized in the Manti LDS Temple July, 1934. Rowena was a fun-loving person. She enjoyed life, especially her family and friends. She provided much service and was always concerned with those less fortunate than herself. She worked 24 years in the school lunch program in Marysvale and loved every child. Preceded in death by five brothers and five sisters, her parents and husband. Survived by four sons, Robert O. Mellor and wife Ferris, Orem; T.E. Anderson, Marysvale; Byron Gail Anderson and wife Barbara, Orem; Myron G. Anderson and wife Carol, Fruit Heights; Jerry S. Anderson, Marysvale (grandson she raised). She had 12 grandchildren; 13 great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandchild. The family expresses a special thanks to Dr. Robert Taylor and Layton Home Care for the care they extended that allowed her to remain at her home until her death. Funeral services will be Monday, June 7th, at 1 p.m., in the Marysvale LDS Chapel. Friends may call Monday morning 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Burial in the Annabella Cemetery. 

Sources:
Richfield Reaper:
26 August 1923.

Salt Lake Tribune:
5 June 1993.

Piute Chieftain:
2 May 1918, 23 May 1918, 30 May 1918, 8 August 1918.

Piute County News:
8 November 1940, 13 December 1940, 21 November 1941, 19. December 1941, 10 April 1942, 22 May 1942, 23 February 1945, 1 February 1946.

 

Orson Wiltshire Dalton:
Son of Orson Allred Dalton and Franz Hannah Wiltshire. Born 18 January 1875, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

1880:
Living at Circle Valley Precinct.

26 March 1898:
Orson Dalton, Jr. and Clarence Munson arrived home from DeLaMar on the 23rd. The boys say there is no place like home.

Source:
Piute Pioneer: 26 March 1898.

 

Philip D. Dalton:
Son of Almeron Ambrose Dalton and Ida Eliza Dack. Born 1 December 1897, at Loa, Wayne, Utah. Married Emelia Rasmussen.

Ordained an elder by John L. Nelson. Ordained high priest by Ira M. Bay, 27 March 1938. Received from Santa Ana, Long Beach, California, April 1942.

1920:
Living at Marysvale. Farmer. Can read and write.

1924-25:
Farming 40 acres (value: $496), at Marysvale.

16 January 1942:
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Dalton and son, Dwain, from California, have been visiting at the home of Hyrum Jensen for a short time. Mr. Dalton expects to return to his work in California soon, but Mrs. Dalton and Dwain will remain here for a few months. Dwain has enrolled at the Piute high school.

Ordained Duane Philip Dalton teacher, 7 July 1940; ordained Duane Philip Dalton priest, 11 January 1942; ordained Duane Philip Dalton elder, 22 November 1942; baptized and confirmed James Philip Patton, 6 June 1943.

Sources:
Piute County News:
16 January 1942, 20 April 1945.

Richfield Reaper:
4 January 1962.

 

Ralph C. Dalton:
Son of LeRoy Dalton and M.A. Thalia McDonough. Born 8 November 1917, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Blessed 3 February 1918 by Charles R. Dalton. Baptized by Ambrose Shurtz and confirmed by Charles R. Dalton, 22 August 1926. Ordained deacon 10 December 1929 by Bp. James L. Whittaker. Removed to Payson, 3 December 1930.

 

Raymond Dalton:
Son of Morgan P. Dalton and Ida Dalley. Born 7 May 1928, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Blessed 7 October 1928 by George Beebe. Baptized by R. Elwood Dalton and confirmed by Albert O. Quist, 24 September 1939. Ordained deacon 18 January 1942 by James L. Whittaker.

 

Reva V. Dalton
Daughter of Charles Robert Dalton and Virginia Peterson. Born 11 February 1904, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 5 June 1904 by James E. Peterson. Baptized by Charles R. Dalton and confirmed by James E. Peterson 14 July 1912. Mission to Central States (Texas), 4 August 1927.

1920:
Living at Circleville. Attended school during previous year; can read and write.

 

Rhea Druce Dalton:
Daughter of Martin Carrell Dalton and Ivy Veater. Born 17 October 1922, at Panguitch, Garfield, Utah. Married James Edgar Martensen 2 July 1940. Blessed 3 December 1922 by Joseph Simkins. Baptized by Joseph Delbert Betenson and confirmed by James L. Whittaker, 2 August 1931. Removed to E.S. Mission, 1 June 1941.

18 January 1940:
Mr. and Mrs. Carrell Dalton of Circleville recently announced the engagement of their daughter, Miss Rhea Dalton, to Jay Martenson, son of Mrs. George Fox, of Circleville. Mr. Martenson is in New York City, and the marriage will take place there in the early spring, and the couple will make their home in Armonk, New York.

Source:
Richfield Reaper: 18 January 1940.

 

Robert Clark Dalton:
Son of Wiley Dalton and Lulu Blanche Brinkerhoff. Born 17 October 1928, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 6 January 1929 by Wiley Dalton. Baptized by Scott Barton Smith and confirmed by James L. Whittaker, 13 June 1937. Ordained deacon 30 November 1941 by R. Elwood Dalton.

 

Robert Elwood Dalton:
Son of Charles Robert Dalton and Virginia Peterson. Born 11 July 1901, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Eva Norton 16 June 1926.

Blessed 1 December 1901 by Jorgen P. Jensen. Baptized by Charles R. Dalton and confirmed by James E. Peterson, 1 August 1909. Ordained deacon 25 January 1914 by John V. Samuelson; teacher 26 March 1917 by Benjamin Cameron, Jr.; priest 5 August 1923 by Charles R. Dalton; elder 29 May 1926 by Rulon S. Wells; high priest 27 November 1927 by George F. Richards.

1920:
Living at Circleville. Farm helper, home farm. Attended school during previous year; can read and write.

11 June 1931:
Elwood Dalton, who has been herding sheep the past winter, is visiting his family for the present.

3 July 1931:
Local Breeder Selects Trade Name for Purebred Holstein Herd –

Mr. R. Elwood Dalton, whose herd of purebred Holstein dairy cattle is well known in Circleville, Utah has recently chosen a trademark name to identify his herd, according to The Holstein Friesian Association of America which registered the name for the breeder. The name chosen as a part of the name of each individual animal in this herd is “Relwood”. All registered Holsteins have a name and number, the name usually indicating the ancestral bloodlines. To identify these animals more closely with the farm where they were bred, the name usually begins with the prefix trademark.

Sources:
Journal History of the Church:
24 June 1951, 30 January 1955.

Piute County News:
3 July 1931, 22 February 1946, 19 April 1946.

Richfield Reaper:
11 June 1931.

 

Robert Lynn Dalton:
Son of Wiley Grant Dalton and Atheneas Revoe Chamberlain. Born 1 January 1938, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Died 28 November 1969. Buried at Circleville; stone reads: “Utah MM3 / US Navy”.

Blessed 5 June 1938 by James L. Whittaker.

29 November 1969:
Murray Worker Dies of High-Voltage Jolt –

A worker for the Murray City power department was electrocuted Friday at 1:50 p.m. while working with a repair crew at 5649 S. State. Lynn Dalton, 31, 2180 Lake St. (740 east) was pronounced dead on arrival at Cottonwood Hospital. The victim was standing on the ground holding a dead wire, which was being cut from a pole preparatory to replacing it with a new line. As a fellow workman in a basket cut the other end of the wire from the pole, the falling wire became energized by a live 7,200-volt line farther down, delivering a fatal shock to Dalton. Murray Police Office David Cummings said the wires either touched or the high voltage arced from the live wire to the dead one.

Sources:
Gravestone.
Deseret News:
29 November 1969.

 

Roger Grant Dalton:
Son of Wiley Grant Dalton and Athneas Revoe Chamberlain. Born 12 January 1936, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 3 May 1936 by James L. Whittaker.

 

Roland W. Dalton:
Son of Ward Dalton and Mary Simkins. Born 29 November 1940, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 2 February 1941 by Bp. James L. Whittaker.

 

Ruby Lavern Dalton:
Daughter of Charles R. Dalton and Virginia Peterson. Born 13 January 1906, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Taylor Carlyle Whittaker, 10 June 1926.

Children:
Donald Whittaker

Clyde Whittaker

Charles Whittaker

Blessed 6 May 1906 by James E. Peterson. Baptized by Charles R. Dalton and confirmed by James E. Peterson 6 September 1914.

1920:
Living at Circleville. Attended school during previous year; can read and write.

11 October 1940:
Relief Society opened Tuesday, October 2. The new officers are: Lois Haycock, president; Hazel Cannon and Josephine Fullmer, counselors; Ruby Whittaker, secretary and treasurer; Alice Allen and Eventa Fullmer, Work and Business, Alta Wiltshire, theology; Fay Lay, social service; Phyllis Whittaker, literature; Clara Dalton, nutrition; Ivy Dalton, coordinator; Daphne Smith, teacher trainer; Rhoda Thompson, chorister; Dathel Thomas, organist.

23 February 1945:
The literature lesson in Relief Society last Tuesday was given by Ruby Whittaker.

 

Sarah Julia Dalton:
Daughter of Charles A. Dalton and Sarah Jane Wiley. Born 5 March 1889, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Wilford E. Anderson 10 November 1915. Baptized 3 July 1897 by R.A. Richey; confirmed 4 July 1897 by Laban Morrill. Received from Ephraim So. Ward, 29 February 1920; removed to Ephraim So. Ward 2 February 1924. Temple sealing 22 November 1916.

1920:
Living at Circleville. Laborer, home farm. Can read and write. Widowed.

 

Sarah Louisa Dalton:
Daughter of Charles Wakeman Dalton and Julia Bowen. Born 6 July 1870, at Beaver, Beaver, Utah. Married Joseph Alfred Elder 26 November 1889, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Baptized by Gilbert Beebe.

1880:
Living at Circle Valley.

26 November 1889:
Wedding ceremony performed by J.E. Peterson; witnesses: Esta M. Fullmer and Lizzie McIntosh.

5 August 1903:
Signed petition asking County Commission to consolidate Circleville and Lost Creek School Districts, claiming that neither district “is able to build a school house of sufficient capacity to accommodate all the children of their respective districts, nor to grade the scholars according to their merits, resulting in the holding back of children that ought to be advanced, for their slower going class mates.”

Source:
Piute Chieftain:
14 November 1918.

                       

Sherman LeRoy Dalton:
Son of LeRoy Dalton and M.A. Thalia McDonough. Born 2 April 1913, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 8 June 1913 by James E. Peterson. Baptized by James L. Whittaker and confirmed by Bp. Henry Sudweeks, 10 July 1921. Ordained deacon 11 January 1926 by LeRoy Dalton; teacher 22 January 1928 by LeRoy Dalton; priest 4 February 1930 by Louring A. Whittaker. Removed to Payson.

1920:
Living at Circleville. Attended school during previous year.

 

Stanley Elwood Dalton:
Son of Robert Elwood Dalton and Eva Norton. Born 7 October 1927, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 1 January 1928 by R. Elwood Dalton. Baptized 8 July 1937 by R. Elwood Dalton; confirmed 5 September 1937 by R. Elwood Dalton; ordained deacon 10 September 1939 by R. Elwood Dalton.

 

Sybil Joy Dalton:

Daughter of Martin Carrell Dalton and Ivy Veater. Born 22 September 1927, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 5 February 1928 by James L. Whittaker. Baptized by Georg Westwood and confirmed by John M. Bucklar, 17 July 1938.

8 November 1940:
Circleville Grade School: Everyone in the 7th and 8th grades enjoyed the Halloween party Oct. 31 at 7:30. We danced and then we had a program. It was as follows: Tap dance by Jeannine Whittaker; song by Syble Dalton, Corrine Jolley and Jeannine Whittaker; school gossip by Rene Lippert; song by Irene Lippert, June Robinson, Valeria Smith, Syble Dalton, Oma Beth Nay and Arlene Morgan. Piano solo by Martha Simkins; poems by June Robinson and Colleen Beebe. After 5 couples were chosen to dance a waltz, polka, fox trot, and Schottische. Prizes were won by Bevan Betenson and Rene Lippert, Gerald Cannon and Oma Beth Nay, Glen Nay and June Robinson, Junior Chidester and Colleen Beebe and Corrine Jolley and Donald Whittaker. They received a candy bar for each couple.

Source:
Piute County News:
8 November 1940.

 

Sylvia Dalton:
Daughter of Morgan P. Dalton and Ida Dalley. Born 28 March 1923, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 7 March 1926 by Henry Sudweeks. Baptized by Joseph Delbert Betenson and confirmed by Charles R. Dalton, 2 August 1931.

25 April 1941:
Circleville shoppers who were in Richfield last Saturday included Mr. and Mrs. Glen Betenson, Mrs. Lois Whittaker, Mrs. Shelby Thomas, Mrs. Ralph Peterson, Mr. and Mrs. C.J. Anderson, Sylvia Dalton, Dora Dean Applegate and Alpine Smith.

Source:
Piute County News:
25 April 1941.

 

Taylor Boyd Dalton:
Son of Martin Carroll Dalton and Ivy Veater. Born 5 December 1924, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 1 February 1925 by Henry Sudweeks. Baptized by R. Elwood Dalton and confirmed by George M. Beebe, 3 September 1933. Ordained teacher 22 September 1940 by James L. Whittaker.

25 April 1941:
Arthur Gottfredson, Brandon Horton, Dick Mortensen, Tommy Fullmer, Raymond Whittaker, Taylor Dalton and Harold Gottfredson attended an invitational track meet at Snow college at Ephraim last Friday. Arthur took first place in the shot put, heaving it 46 feet and 1 inch, and placed 2nd in the discus, throwing it 114 feet.

Source:
Piute County News:
25 April 1941.

 

Taylor Whittaker Dalton:
Son of Martin Carroll Dalton, Sr., and Charlotte Ellen Whittaker. Born 7 April 1900, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Died 5 September 1921. Buried at Circleville. Blessed 7 November 1900, by Laban D. Morrill. Baptized by Joseph Steele and confirmed by James E. Peterson, 5 July 1908.

19 September 1918:
Patriotic Men Make Response to Call –
Responding to the call of the Nation for recruits for the army, the loyal citizens of Piute county between the ages of 18 and 45, both inclusive, flocked to the registration places last Thursday and when the totals had been counted in the several registration offices throughout the county, 297 names had been recorded. The county fell short just forty names, according to the number allotted. Piute county had been set aside to furnish 337, but only 297 men were registered. The officers have announced that a close canvas will be made and the county thoroughly “combed” for any slacker and should any be found they will be made to suffer the penalty as prescribed for failing to register. Reports from all the registration offices throughout the county are to the effect that the work was done expeditiously and that there was not the least semblance of disorder. The day had been declared holiday and all business houses were closed for the occasion. The following is a list of the men registered: Circleville... Taylor Whittaker Dalton.

14 November 1918:
Subscribed for bonds “of the fourth issue” (World War I war bonds), at Circleville.

Of Circleville; appears on list of “persons whose registration cards are in the possession of” Piute County Draft Board, WWI-era.

1920:
Living in Circleville; did not attend school in 1919; can read and write; single.

5 September 1921:
Died of acute articular rheumatism.

Source:
Piute Chieftain:
19 September 1918, 14 November 1918.

 

Theone Dalton:
Son of Myron Challis Dalton and Elvira Williams. Born 12 December 1919 at Marysvale. Blessed 16 May 1920 by Wallace Johnson.

1920:
Living at Marysvale.

19 December 1941:
Mrs. Chell Dalton, Theone Dalton, Mrs. Edwin Nay and Mrs. Ervin Mellro were shopping in Richfield Saturday.

13 February 1942:
Chell Dalton, Theone Dalton, and Champ Allen have gone to John’s Valley to cut timber.

8 March 1956:
Elevator Drops 150 Feet in Uranium Mine; Worker Hurt - A 36-year-old uranium mine worker, Theone Dalton of Marysvale was reported to be improving Wednesday from injuries he received in a mine accident Tuesday afternoon while working in the Pots fraction mine near Marysvale. Mr. Dalton was in the elevator cage at the time of the accident. Apparently the cable snapped and the cage fell some 150 feet downward to the bottom of the shaft. Several other men were in the mine at the time, and Dale Johnson, one of the men rushed to Marysvale where a doctor was summoned and brought to the scene. After emergency treatment, Mr. Dalton was rushed to Richfield in a panel truck, accompanied by the doctor and escorted by highway patrol trooper Gail Rasmussen of Panguitch. Mr. Dalton was treated at the Sevier Valley hospital for head lacerations and abrasions, shock and a fractured pelvis and ankle. He was given blood transfusions at the hospital and Wednesday was reported to be in “satisfactory” condition. Additional blood was sent to replace that used from state Red Cross headquarters, arriving through a highway shuttle system at 1:30 a.m. Three highway troopers brought the blood in to keep the local area supplied. This is under the new blood program that is locally supervised by the South Sevier chapter of the Red Cross.

14 January 1960:
Theone Dalton, enroute to California was an overnight visitor with his family.

Sources:
Piute County News:
19 December 1941, 13 February 1942.

Richfield Reaper:
8 March 1956, 14 January 1960.

 

Tressa Laree Dalton:
Daughter of R. Elwood Dalton and Eva Norton. Born 1 October 1941, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 4 January 1942 by R. Elwood Dalton.

 

Velva Dalton:
2 February 1953:
Mrs. Velva Dalton Casto, 57, former resident of Salt Lake City, died after a lingering illness Saturday at her Corona, Cal. residence. Born June 10, 1895, at Circleville, Piute County, she was a daughter of Marvin Dalton Sr. and Molly Hall Dalton. She was married to Fred Casto in Utah. She was an active member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She resided in Salt Lake City for many years prior to moving to Corona in 1945. Besides her husband, she is survived by two sons and two daughters, Lynn Casto, Concord, Cal.; Mrs. V. Maurien Casto Allen, Salt Lake City; Mrs. Lera Casto Lowe and Mardel Casto, Corona; eight grandchildren; three brothers: M.A. Dalton, Monroe, Sevier County; Floyd Dalton, Salt Lake City, and Lee Dalton, Provo. Funeral services will be conducted Tuesday at Corona.

Source:
Deseret News:
2 February 1953.

 

Vernon Allred Dalton:
Son of Martin Carrell Dalton and Charlotte Ellen Whittaker. Born 12 October 1909, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Clara Edwards 19 March 1938.

Died 22 October 1972. Buried at Circleville; stone reads: “Father”.

Blessed 6 March 1910 by James E. Peterson. Baptized by James O. Meeks and confirmed by Charles R. Dalton, 25 June 1918. Ordained deacon 5 August 1923 by Wiley Dalton; teacher 22 February 1926 by Charles R. Dalton; priest, 29 January 1928 by Bp. James L. Whittaker.

1920:
Living at Circleville. Attended school during previous year; can read and write.

Below story provided by daughter Janet Dalton Roberts:
Vernon Allred Dalton was the eighth and last child born to Martin C. and Nellie Dalton. He came into the world covered with small pox as Nellie had come down with small pox shortly before he was born. Brother Lawrence was four years old, Francis was seven, and Taylor was nine. Oldest sister Irene had married that spring. Brother Carrell married when Vern was 3 years old and Vera married when he was seven years old. He had several nieces and nephews to play with who were near his own age.

During his high school years Vern played basketball and enjoyed being in theatrical productions. He especially liked the character parts where no one could tell who he was. He graduated from Circleville High School and always felt bad because he was unable to have any further education, however he liked to read and learned many things from books. He always used good grammar and never used profanity.

In 1938 he married Clara Edwards who had come to Circleville to teach school. They were blessed with two daughters, Janet and Linda, whom they loved very much. Linda whose health was frail, died at the age of 22 months.

Vern was a friendly, personable man, having many friends. He was always honest in his dealings with people and trusting of them. He loved hunting deer and pheasants. Fishing was another of his passions as were horses. Being a good shot, he was a successful deer hunter, but he was always looking for a good "bird dog" to help with the pheasant hunting, mostly unsuccessfully. He had a series of dogs, all of whom were good pets, but were not much good for flushing birds. He had a fish trap in the river to catch minnows to use as bait in fishing. He loved to eat tomatoes and cucumbers in vinegar and usually had a garden. Every spring he made a trip to various places to gather watercress. His working life was spent on the family farm raising cows, pigs, horses, chickens, turkeys, lambs, grain, potatoes, and hay. His skin never burned and he always had a good tan. Having been around his mother’s beehives, a bee sting did not affect him and he was called whenever a neighbor had a swarm of bees to be removed. He also worked for the Forest Service several summers spraying bug trees.

Vern’s greatest pride and joy were his daughter Janet and her four children. There was nothing that he would not do for them and they all adored him. A letter or a visit from them would always make him happy. Vern left this earth ten days after his 63rd birthday in the house where he had always lived with his wife Clara, his daughter Janet and his brother Lawrence by his side.

 

Von Dalton:
Daughter of LeRoy Dalton and Thalia McDonough. Born 5 May 1925, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Blessed 2 August 1925 by LeRoy Dalton. Removed to Payson, 3 December 1930.

 

Ward B. Dalton:
Son of Wiley Dalton and Lulu Brinkerhoff. Born 12 February 1914, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Mary Simkins 17 October 1934.

Children:
Kathleen Dalton

Roland Dalton

Hoard Dalton

Elouise Dalton

Russel Dalton

Died 18 February 1989. Buried at Circleville.

Blessed 3 May 1914 by James E. Peterson. Baptized by Loring A. Whittaker and confirmed by Charles R. Dalton 3 September 1922. Ordained deacon 22 January 1928 by Wiley Dalton. Temple sealing 7 January 1989.

1920:
Living at Circleville. Attended school during previous year.

 

Warren M. Dalton:
Son of LeRoy Dalton and Mary Ann Thalia McDonough. Born 5 September 1914, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Blessed 6 December 1914, by James E. Peterson; baptized by Marcus Bickley and confirmed by Dwight L. Fullmer, 5 August 1923. Ordained deacon 22 January 1928, by LeRoy Dalton. Removed to Payson, 3 December 1930.

 

Wiley Dalton:
Son of Charles Albert Dalton and Sarah Jane Wiley. Born 20 February 1879, at Circleville, Piute, Utah. Married Lola Blanche Brinkerhoff, 10 December 1909.

Died 27 February 1945. Buried at Circleville; stone reads: “Father”.

Children:
Leverda Dalton, born 13 June 1907, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Wiley Grant Dalton, born 29 September 1910, at Junction, Piute, Utah.

Grant W. Dalton, born about 1911, in Utah.

Ward B. Dalton, born 12 February 1914, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Chloris Dalton, born 28 November 1919, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Robert Clark Dalton, born 17 October 1928, at Circleville, Piute, Utah.

Baptized and confirmed 11 August 1889, by Laban D. Morrill; ordained a teacher, 19 April 1898, by Robert A. Richey; ordained an elder, 23 February 1902, by Jorgen P. Jensen; ordained a seventy. Mission to Southern States, 5 March 1902.

1880:
Living in Circle Valley.

December 1896:
Injured leg in wagon accident.

16 January 1903:

Wiley Dalton of Circleville, and who is on a mission to the Southern states, recently wrote the Free Lance in an appreciative vein, and ordered his home paper to box 132.

27 February 1945:

Farmer, stockman; lifetime resident of Utah. Died of coronary thrombosis. Funeral services held 3 March 1945, at Circleville Ward chapel, conducted by bishop.

9 March 1945:

Funeral Held for Circleville Man Saturday Afternoon - Funeral services for Wiley Dalton, 66, farmer and livestock man of Circleville, were held Saturday afternoon of last week in the Circleville LDS Ward chapel. Musical numbers were a song by a mixed quartette, a violin solo by Judd Haycock, with Dathel Thomas at the piano; a vocal solo by Bill Horton, a song by the quartette. Speakers included C.B. Crane, a life history of the deceased by Nellie Fullmer and a talk aby D.L. Fullmer. J.W. Reynolds offered the invocation and the benediction was pronounced by Delbert Dalton. Burial was in the Circleville cemetery, with the grave being dedicated by John Bucklar. Out-of-town relatives who attended the services included Mr. and Mrs. Ray Fenton, Pleasant Grove; Roy Dalton of California, Edna Peterson and Sarah Nielson, Salt Lake City; Mr. and Mrs. Lester Poulson and daughter, Ephraim; Mr. and Mrs. John Folsom, Greenriver; Mr. and Mrs. William Brinkerhoff, Virgin; Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Sledge, Beaver; Mr. and Mrs. Clive Brinkerhoff, Junction; Amy Brinkerhoff, Beaver; Amy Barnson, Nellie Greenhalgh, Virginia Barnson and Mary Barnson.

Sources:

Gravestone.

Piute County News: 6 January 1928, 27 January 1928, 20 December 1929, 6 February. 1931, 10 May 1931, 22 May 1931, 23 February 1945, 9 March 1945.

Wiley Grant Dalton:
Son of Wiley Dalton and Lulu Brinkerhoff. Born 29 September 1910, at Junction, Piute, Utah. Married Athenese Revoe Chamberlain, 15 May 1934. Died 1 June 1980. Buried at Circleville.

Blessed 4 December 1910, by James E. Peterson; baptized by Irvin Allen and confirmed by Rostin G. Simkins, 17 August 1919. Ordained deacon 5 August 1923, by Wiley Dalton; teacher 22 January 1928, by Wiley Dalton. Removed to Salt Lake City 12 December 1937.

1920:
Living at Circleville. Attended school during previous year.

Some more information about our Circleville Dalton's taken from Rodney Dalton’s FTM database: (Not in any order)

 

Francis Joshua Dalton:
The forth son of Martin Carrell Dalton Sr. and Charlotte Ellen "Nellie" Whittaker.

He was born on February 05, 1902 in Circleville, Piute, Utah. He died on July 06, 1924.

Sunday morning, July 6th, 1924 dawned bright and clear. The sky was an unbroken expanse of azure blue. The bees, from the hives in the old orchard, were busily gathering nectar from Grandma Dalton's large flower garden. I do not know if church was even held that Sunday morning in Circleville. The large porches and vast stretches of lawn at the Dalton home were crowded with people who had gathered from throughout the valley to lend comfort, Love and support to the family at this tragic time. The children had their noses pressed to the windows of the dining room. The three large windows extended from the thirteen-foot ceiling to within one foot of the floor. The taller children were peering over the heads of the shorter ones. They gazed transfixed at the young man lying on the dining room table and the doctor holding a saw in his hand.

This is the scene indelibly engraved in my memory but I really should start my story at the beginning.

Friday, July 4th began before dawn with the sound of cannons (really only sticks of dynamite) reverberating throughout the valley. On this particular day three young men had been chosen to set off the dynamite. They had been such good pals all their lives that they had become known as The Three Musketeers. They were my friends too, although I was only six. They took me to the movies which came only once a week and were shown at the Church House. Uncle France always carried me home on his back ... so comforting after being so frightened watching the weekly serials of The Green Archer or The Bat. They took me to the ice cream parlor and for horseback rides down Lover's Lane. Such wonderful companions for a fatherless little girl. My mother and I were sleeping in a bedroom just off the front room as it was called in those days. The parlor was just to the south of the front room and was really at the front of the house but it was hardly ever used except for parties or by my sister and her boy friends. I could sit on the top step of the stairs in the front hallway and look through the glass transom above the door at them spooning on the settee. I had been listening to the big booms the dynamite made, so proud that my Uncle France, Bill and Glen were the ones creating them. Suddenly the east door to the front room opened and a shaky voice called through the open door of the bedroom, "Rene, will you come here?" Mother and I both ran into the front room but she quickly pushed me back into the bedroom and closed the door firmly. Uncle France told Mother they had agreed to use only half sticks of dynamite and to bury them before lighting them. They had just lighted one half stick and one of the boys yelled "Run!" Uncle France saw a whole stick of dynamite lying on the ground and picked it up thinking it had been dropped by accident. As he ran, it exploded blowing the fingers from his hand and making a large hole in his side. How he ever managed to walk more than a quarter mile home even with the help of Bill and Glen only our Heavenly Father knows.

The only other memories I have of that tragic weekend are of Grandma Dalton standing on the back porch holding up his clothes and the checkbook which had been in his shirt pocket so friends and relatives could view the yellow powder burns. Someone had even found one of his fingers and brought it to her. The doctor sawed off his arm that beautiful, hot tragic Sunday morning and Uncle France, who was only twenty-two years old, died.

Who lighted the whole stick of dynamite and left it lying on the ground? Only two young men knew. They never told until after Bill had died, an old man, many years later and then Glen said it was Bill who had done it. If Glen had died first would Bill have said Glen did it? What a terrible burden to have to carried for a long life time ... the devastating knowledge that you were responsible for the death of your best, dearly loved friend.

The answer lies in the graves of two of the three musketeers, all three of whom are buried in the same cemetery in the beautiful Valley where they were born and where they grew to manhood.

I wonder ..... I wonder ...... for over sixty years I have wondered but do I really want to know the secret of the grave?

The doctor sawed Uncle Frances arm off just below the elbow the same day he was hurt. He lived for three days.

Source:
By Gaia Peterson Davis Christensen.

 

Henrietta Dalton:
Henrietta Dalton, the third child of Charles Wakeman and Sarah Jane Lee Dalton was born 13 Jan. 1857, Ft. Harmony, Utah. She was married about 1874-5, in Beaver, Utah, to James Carrigan. She died in Salt Lake City, and was buried in Mt. Olive Cemetery. He also died in Salt Lake and is buried there.

Very little is known of the early life of Henrietta. She grew to young womanhood in Beaver, and married there. James Carrigan and his brother, Henry were transients who drifted into Beaver and worked as carpenters on the old Co-op building there when it was being constructed. It was at this time that she met and married him. She knew absolutely nothing about him nor his background. They moved to Salt Lake City and lived on a farm owned by a Mr. Harris, which was located near the Old State Penitentiary, which in 1957, was abandoned and destroyed. She never did see her mother again, and the only member of her family who ever saw her after her marriage was her sister Agatha Ann, who visited with her for a short time.

James was very strict with his wife and children and at times very cruel. Three weeks before the birth of her third child he injured her back and she was never out of bed again and died when the baby was three weeks old. She begged to see her mother and commenced a letter to her which he finished and sent weeks later. He would not let the grandmother, Sarah Jane Dalton have the children but as they grew older and were able to manage it, the two older ones ran away and went to her and lived in Beaver.

Carrigan returned to the empty house where Henrietta had died and caused his own death by a self inflicted gunshot wound. He had remarried a daughter of Phineas Young and accorded to her and her children the same treatment Henrietta received at his hands. They had several children.

 

Sarah Vilate Dalton:
The forth daughter of Charles Wakeman Dalton and Sarah Jane Lee.

Sarah Vilate Dalton was born on 10 Aug. 1866 in Fillmore, Millard, Utah. She was christened in Fillmore, Millard, Utah. She died on 29 Jan. 1928 in Moreland, Bingham, Idaho. She was buried on 2 Feb. 1928 in Moreland, Bingham, Idaho. She was born in the covenant. She was baptized on 5 August 1877. She was endowed on 29 June 1904 in the Logan Utah temple. She married William Howell McKnight on 20 Nov. 1884 in Minersville, Beaver, Utah. They were sealed on 29 June 1904 in the Logan, Utah temple.

The next story is of Robert Wiley, who’s daughter, Sarah Ann Wiley married Charles Albert Dalton, son of Charles Wakeman Dalton.

 

THE ROBERT WILEY FAMILY:
Robert Wiley was born on 22 November 1809 and christened in the parish of St Denis, York, Yorkshire Co. England on 20 December 1808. His parents were John Wiley, born in 1782 and Elizabeth Lawton Wiley, born 1784. He married Sarah Darling when he was 24 and she was 19. They were married at St. Peters Church, St. Peters St., Liverpool, England on 28 Aug. 1832. Sarah Darling was born on 15 Dec. 1813 at Liverpool Lancashire, England. Sarah was the daughter of John and Ann Youd Darling. The Darlings were from Scotland and never joined the church.

The Wileys decided to move to America, shortly after they were married. They sailed on 21 September 1832 in company with his father's family. They settled in Newark, Licking County, Ohio. Their first child, Maria, was born 13 months later on 3 Oct 1833 in Newark, Licking, Ohio. She only lived for one day. It must have been a sad experience, moving to America while Sarah was pregnant, settling in a new country and losing her first Child.

Robert and Sarah waited two years to have another child. John Hirarn was born on 24 Oct. 1834. They were still residing in Newark, Ohio. John only lived until the age of 4 years and died on 17 May 1839.

William came into the family three years later on 17 Dec. 183 7 at Newark, Ohio. William died within the month that he was born.

Their fourth child, William Darling was born on 8 May 1839, 11 days before their second son passed away.

I can see that their first stay in America was not a very happy time in their lives. They had four children and three of them died during this period. They must have decided that they would take their son William Darling back to England to see if they could have a better life in England.

Robert, Sarah and young William could have taken the Eric Canal or gone overland to New York City to obtain passage on a ship back to Liverpool Lancashire England. This occurred sometime between May 8 1839 when William Darling was born and 23 Nov. 1841 when Ann Darling was born.

After their return to England, Sarah Darling Wiley went into business for herself. A section of a large market was reserved for her, where she sold bacon, cheese, lard and eggs. Her business grew and she saved quite an amount of money.

Robert Wiley was so impressed upon hearing the gospel that he was baptized at once, the date being 14 April 1843. When Robert was baptized he was 35 years old and his wife was 30 years old. They had two living children, William Darling, age 3 and Ann Darling age 1. Sarah was pregnant with James at this time. James Darling was born on 1 Jan 1844.

The family lived at 5 Chapel Lane Harford Street, Liverpool when John Darting was born 14 Feb. 1846. John Darling contracted cholera infantum and died in his first year of birth on 26 Aug. 1846. This was not a new occurrence for this family as they had three other children die before him. We know that they lived close to Sarah's Father John who lived at 22 Bittem Street in Liverpool as he was the informant on the death certificate of John Darling Wiley. Robert earned his living as a bricklayer and continued this profession through out his life. In February of 1849 Robert Wiley was appointed to preside over the Liverpool Branch of the Church.

Robert's wife Sarah did not join the church when he did. He kept waiting and hoping that she would see the beauty of this new religion, but she could not see it , so he decided to return to America without her. He was very generous, and many times gave his voyage money that he had saved to the poor that wished to come to America. Finally, he left taking the two older boys with him, and leaving his wife and younger children in England. This must have been quite a feat for Robert. Imagine having lost three children in America before and now agreeing to go farther West into a desert to live.

When Robert Wiley arrived in the United States, he made plans to cross the plains to Utah. While crossing the plains, he was made the leader of a company of ten. He arrived in Salt Lake City, Utah in the fall of 1850. He was a member of the first Brass Band organized in Salt Lake City.

In December 1850, he volunteered to go with George a. Smith's company to settle Iron County, Utah, arriving there the 23 January 1851.

George A. Smith wrote the following about this undertaking:
“This colony numbering 120 men with their families left Salt Lake City the first day of December, 1850 for Parowan. We numbered 100 wagons, a number of carriages, and I assure you it was a sight to see this number of wagons wending among the hills and mountains with each wagon a smoking stove pipe sticking through the white canvas cover. It looked like a line of stern goats. The ground being at various depths covered with snow. On 27, January 1851, twenty teams started hauling logs from the mountains for houses and on January 30, 1851 the meeting hall was three logs high.”

The next spring Robert Wiley raised his first potatoes. He had seed, potatoes gathered one Sunday afternoon in his silk handkerchief where one of the sisters had thrown them out. Carefully planted and cared for they made a crop. At this time, he and others had no bread for about three months, living principally on boiled wheat, there being no flower mius with in their reach to grind it for them.

In 1851, George A. Smith appointed Robert Wiley leader of the Parowan Choir. In May of the same year he was elected a member of the City Council. In the fall of 1853 he was elected a member of the Territorial legislature from Iron County, under Governor Brigham Young.

Even though Sarah was not converted to the LDS Church, Robert finally convinced her to give up here business in England and immigrate to the United States to join the Latter Day Saints in Utah. After Sarah got to Salt Lake City and could see the gospel in its fullness she decided that she wanted to embrace the gospel and be married for time and all eternity. She was baptized on 14 Sep. 1852 and sealed to Robert in the Endowment House one day later on 15 Sept. 1852. Sarah Darling Wiley was also very generous with her means and money, and assisted may poor people in Utah. She made three trips across the ocean in the interest of her property.

Sarah and Robert Wiley, while living in Utah, attended the old Endowment House at Salt Lake City.

Sarah Darling Wiley was very generous with her means of money, helping many poor people in Utah. She made three trips across the ocean in the interest of her property. Her parents were Scotch people and never joined the Church.

They moved to the desert country of Southern Utah, a small settlement called Cedar City, either that year or the following year. He walked a distance of more than a mile to his work bare footed. Though he was raised up and spent the early part of his life in easy circumstances, in England, he often said he never regretted having joined the church and coming to Utah for there was nothing outside of the Latter Day Saint Church for him. Wherever he lived, he and his wife were always members of the choir, for they loved music and liked to sing. They were always Ernest workers in the church.

Being a brick mason by trade, during the eighteen fifties, he was closely associated and labored in partnership with Elias Morris, the mason who resided for may years in the Fifteenth Ward in Salt Lake City, and built may brick houses in that district.

In 1859 Robert Wiley moved to Tokerville, Washington County, Utah there he built the first adobe house erected in that town. Sarah Jane was born to them on 23 Jun. 1853. She married Charles Albert Dalton. They were married on 9 Oct. 1870. Sara Jane was 17 years old and Charles was 21 years old.

Robert and Sarah continued to live in Cedar City, five years later their last child Heber was born. Tragedy struck again and two years later Heber also passed away. My the sorrows that Sarah and Robert had to endure, five of their nine children died in infancy. However imagine the joy of the knowledge of the gospel knowing they were sealed as a family for time and all eternity.

Robert continued his profession as a bricklayer. He moved to Beaver City, Beaver County, Utah in the fall of 1860, a town about 50 miles north of Cedar City, where he held many positions of trust. He resided in Beaver City until the time of his death on the 30 Jun 1872 at the age of 63 years, dying as he lived in the faith and fellowship in the gospel of Jesus Christ. He was buried in the Beaver cemetery. During all these years of hardship, his wife lived and labored with him in " things, a faithful and willing helpmate.

After Robert passed away, Sarah come to live with her daughter Sarah Jane who had moved to Circleville, Utah, just across the large mountain range in the valley to the east. She passed away on 2 Jan 1897 at the age of 84 and was buried in the Circleville cemetery. She was the mother of nine children.

Robert Wiley was appointed to act on the school examining Board to pass on the teachers qualifications in 1860. In 1866, Robert Wiley and Samuel Edward's did the masonry work on the Beaver Stake House.

Robert walked a distance of more than a mile to his work barefooted. Though he was raised up and spent the early part of his life in easy circumstances in England, he often said he never regretted having joined the church and coming to Utah for there was nothing outside of the Latter-day Saint Church for him.

Wherever they lived, Robert and Sarah were always members of the choir, for they loved music and liked to sing. There was always earnest workers in the Church.

From the history of Utah, Vol. 2, page 97, we get the following; which is the English marriage License:

"Robert Wiley, born 22, Nov, 1899, York, Yorkshire, England. Father, John Wiley, Mother Elizabeth Wiley. Married Sarah Darling the 28 August 1832, at St. Peters Church, Liverpool, England. She was born 1815 in Liverpool England. Her Father was John Darling.” Roberts Father's name was not given in the marriage license. It was John Wiley.

In the Deseret News of June 1872, we read that:

"Robert Wiley died at Beaver City, Utah of pneumonia, on June 30, 1872. He embraced the gospel in Liverpool England in 1842. He was one of those who accompanied George A. Smith on his first trip to southern Utah. He was 63 years old when he died."

Sources of Information:
Part of this was written by Arthur R. Whittaker. Part of it was taken from Birth and Death certificates obtained while Arthur R. Whittaker was on a genealogy mission to the Hyde Park Family History Centre in London, England. Part was written by a great grandson, Orin Collett, of Shell Beach California. Part of the material was taken from the History of Utah, Vol. 2 Page 97. Some written by a daughter, Jane Wiley Dalton. Also part of this was taken from the Autobiography of George A. Smith and the files of the Deseret New. Some were furnished by his granddaughter, Charlotte Simkins Nelson. Some was taken from the History of Iron and Beaver Counties.

Official LDS Church record on Robert Wiley:
Birth: Wiley, Robert - Date: November 22, 1809 - Place: York, Yorkshire, England. Parents: Wiley, Robert - Father: Wiley, John - Mother: Wiley, ElizabethDeath: Wiley, Robert - Date: June 30, 1872 - Buried: Beaver, Beaver, UT.Marriage Information: Wiley, Robert - Spouse: Darling, Sarah - Date: August 28, 1832 Place: Liverpool, Lancashire, England.

Children:
Name: Birth date: Place:

1.Wiley, Marion October 3, 1833 Newark, Licking, OH.

2. Wiley, John Hiram October 24, 1834 Newark, Licking, OH.

3. Wiley, William November 20, 1837 Newark, Licking, OH.

4. Wiley, William Darling May 18, 1839 Liverpool, Lancashire, England.

5. Wiley, Ann Darling November 23, 1841 Liverpool, Lancashire, England.

6. Wiley, James Darling January 1, 1844 Liverpool, Lancashire, England.

7. Wiley, John February 14, 1846 Liverpool, Lancashire, England.

8. Wiley, Sarah Jane June 23, 1853 Cedar City, Iron, UT.

9. Wiley, Heber George February 22, 1858 Cedar City, Iron, UT.

Church Ordinance Data: Wiley, Robert

Baptism Date: April 14, 1843

Temple Ordinance Data: Wiley, Robert

Endowment Date: September 1852 - Temple: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, UT.

Sealed to Spouse - Date: September 15, 1852 - Temple: Endowment House, Salt Lake City, UT.

Vocations: Wiley, Robert - Brick Layer.

Letter to the editor of the Times and Seasons: (Robert Wiley)
“On the 16th of April last, a respectable merchant, by the name of Robert Wiley, commenced digging in a large mound near this place; he excavated to the depth of ten feet and came to rock. About that time the rain began to fall, and he abandoned the work.

On the 23rd, he and quite a number of the citizens, with myself, repaired to the mound; and after making ample opening, we found plenty of rock, the most of which appeared as though it had been strongly burned; and after removing full two feet of said rock, we found plenty of charcoal and ashes; also human bones that appeared as though they had been burned; and near the encephalon a bundle was found that consisted of six plates of brass of a bell shape, each having a hole near the small end, and a ring through them all, and clasped with two clasps. The rings and clasps appeared to be iron very much oxydated. The plates appeared first to be copper, and had the appearance of being covered with characters. It was agreed by the company that I should cleanse the plates. Accordingly I took them to my house, washed them with soap and water and a woolen cloth; but, finding them not yet cleansed, I treated them with dilute sulphuric acid, which made them perfectly clean, on which it appeared that they were completely covered with hieroglyphics that none as yet have been able to read.

Wishing that the world might know the hidden things as fast as they come to light, I was induced to state the facts, hoping that you would give it an insertion in your excellent paper; for we all feel anxious to know the true meaning of the plates, and publishing the facts might lead to the true translation.

They were found, I judged, more than twelve feet below the surface of the top of the mound.”

I am, most respectfully, a citizen of Kinderhook, W. P. HARRIS, M. D.

We, the citizens of Kinderhook, whose names are annexed, do certify and declare that on the 23rd of April, 1843, while excavating a large mound in this vicinity, Mr. R. Wiley took from said mound six brass plates of a bell shape, covered with ancient characters. Said plates were very much oxydated. The bands and rings on said plates mouldered into dust on a slight pressure.

ROBERT WILEY, W. LONGNECKER, GEO. DECKENSON, FAYETTE GRUBB, W. FUGATE, W. P. HARRIS, J. R. SHARP, G. W. F. WARD, IRA S. CURTIS, (From the Quincy Whig.)

Source:
History of the Church, Vol. 5, Chap. 19, p.374

 

Next are many pictures of our Dalton family that lived in Circleville, Piute Co. Utah

One of the Dalton family gold mines in Marysvale, Utah

 

 

My Grandfather, Martin Carrell Dalton Jr.

 

Iva Dalton with her daughters, Garneta & Arda

 

The gravestone of Martin C. Dalton and Iva Dalton in the Circleville Cemetery